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Lesson Plan by Mitchell Zuvela B. Sc., B. Ed.

Waves and Electromagnetic Radiation

Pixton Lesson Plan on Waves and Electromagnetic Radiation

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Waves and Electromagnetic Radiation

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Teacher Guide

Waves and Electromagnetic Radiation

Step 1Class discussion with students

In the medical field, radiation is used in various diagnostic equipment as a tool to visualize the human body. When a doctor wants to see a broken bone, an X-ray will provide a basic two-dimensional view of various dense structures in the body. For more complex issues, a CT scan or MRI will provide a more complete view of the human body. These diagnostic devices provide doctors with detailed images that can help them make quicker and more accurate decisions. Ask your class if any anyone has had a personal experience with any of the medical imaging tools discussed. What was their experience and how did it impact their lives?

Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Comic
    CT vs. MRI

    View Activity
  • Make a Comic
    Dangers of Electromagnetic Radiation

    View Activity
  • Make a Comic
    Technologies of Today and Tomorrow

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Discuss (Extension / Modification)

    Discuss the impact that new imaging technologies will have on society such as HD live ultrasounds.

  • Extension / Modification
    Timeline (Extension / Modification)

    Create a Timeline summarizing the history of radiology.

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Read the list of injuries below and ask your students to determine whether an X-ray, CT scan, or MRI would be the best diagnostic tool. Students must explain their reasoning in a few short sentences.

  • Broken leg
  • Brain tumor
  • Ligament damage
  • Blood clot
  • Severed fingers
  • Spinal injury
  • Nerve inflammation
  • Collapsed lung
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Waves and Electromagnetic Radiation 1 CT vs. MRI

Intro

In the medical field, radiation is being used in various diagnostic equipment as a tool to visualize the human body. When a doctor wants to see a broken bone, an X-ray will provide a basic two-dimensional view of various dense structures in the body. For more complex issues, a CT scan or MRI will provide a more complete view of the human body. These diagnostic devices provide doctors with detailed images that can help them make quicker and more accurate decisions.

Instructions

Design a T-Chart comparing the main features of a CT scan and MRI.

Each panel should include:

  • An appropriate visual
  • An explanation of the key features

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: CT vs. MRI

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

4 3 2 1
Knowledge Understands scientific facts, procedures, concepts, principals, theories and methods. • demonstrates substantial scientific knowledge
• ideas are supported with strong supporting details
• Precise and advanced use of scientific terminology
• demonstrates adequate scientific knowledge
• ideas are supported with relevant supporting details
• appropriate use of scientific terminology
• demonstrates limited scientific knowledge
• ideas are supported with brief supporting details
• some use of scientific terminology
• demonstrates little scientific knowledge
• ideas are supported with weak or no supporting details
• Little to no use of scientific terminoloy
Application Applies scientific knowledge, skills and methods to hypothesize, analyze and conclude. • exceptional application of the scientific method when solving problems
• no errors in carrying out procedure
• accurately applies the scientific method when solving problems
• limited errors in carrying out procedure
• limited application of the scientific method when solving problems
• several errors in carrying out procedure
• does not apply the scientific method when solving problems
• multiple errors in carrying out procedure
Communication Communicates scientific knowledge through writing, speech and visuals. • panels are highly organized with exceptional use of relevant details
• written and visual content is highly effective
• accurate and precise communication of data
• panels are organized with consistent use of relevant details
• written and visual content is accurate and complete
• accurate and consistent communication of data
• panels are organized with few relevant details
• limited written and visual content
• incomplete or brief data communication
• panels are unorganized with little relevant details
• written and visual content is missing
• limited or no communication of data
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Waves and Electromagnetic Radiation 2 Dangers of Electromagnetic Radiation

Instructions

Design a Poster identifying the dangers of x-rays, gamma rays, and ultraviolet radiation.

  • Discuss the side effects of human exposure on living cells, including potential sources of radiation.
  • Illustrations should accurately convey ideas.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Dangers of Electromagnetic Radiation

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

4 3 2 1
Knowledge Understands scientific facts, procedures, concepts, principals, theories and methods. • demonstrates substantial scientific knowledge
• ideas are supported with strong supporting details
• Precise and advanced use of scientific terminology
• demonstrates adequate scientific knowledge
• ideas are supported with relevant supporting details
• appropriate use of scientific terminology
• demonstrates limited scientific knowledge
• ideas are supported with brief supporting details
• some use of scientific terminology
• demonstrates little scientific knowledge
• ideas are supported with weak or no supporting details
• Little to no use of scientific terminoloy
Application Applies scientific knowledge, skills and methods to hypothesize, analyze and conclude. • exceptional application of the scientific method when solving problems
• no errors in carrying out procedure
• accurately applies the scientific method when solving problems
• limited errors in carrying out procedure
• limited application of the scientific method when solving problems
• several errors in carrying out procedure
• does not apply the scientific method when solving problems
• multiple errors in carrying out procedure
Communication Communicates scientific knowledge through writing, speech and visuals. • panels are highly organized with exceptional use of relevant details
• written and visual content is highly effective
• accurate and precise communication of data
• panels are organized with consistent use of relevant details
• written and visual content is accurate and complete
• accurate and consistent communication of data
• panels are organized with few relevant details
• limited written and visual content
• incomplete or brief data communication
• panels are unorganized with little relevant details
• written and visual content is missing
• limited or no communication of data
Total

Example Poster

Dangers of Electromagnetic Radiation by Student

Here's the link to share this comic:

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Waves and Electromagnetic Radiation 3 Technologies of Today and Tomorrow

Instructions

Create a Storyboard explaining how the technology in a microwave oven or solar cell works.

  • Identify how electromagnetic radiation is used to heat food in a microwave, or how photoelectric materials are used to create electricity.

Each panel should include:

  • An appropriate illustration
  • A detailed description of how the technology works

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Technologies of Today and Tomorrow

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

4 3 2 1
Knowledge Understands scientific facts, procedures, concepts, principals, theories and methods. • demonstrates substantial scientific knowledge
• ideas are supported with strong supporting details
• Precise and advanced use of scientific terminology
• demonstrates adequate scientific knowledge
• ideas are supported with relevant supporting details
• appropriate use of scientific terminology
• demonstrates limited scientific knowledge
• ideas are supported with brief supporting details
• some use of scientific terminology
• demonstrates little scientific knowledge
• ideas are supported with weak or no supporting details
• Little to no use of scientific terminoloy
Application Applies scientific knowledge, skills and methods to hypothesize, analyze and conclude. • exceptional application of the scientific method when solving problems
• no errors in carrying out procedure
• accurately applies the scientific method when solving problems
• limited errors in carrying out procedure
• limited application of the scientific method when solving problems
• several errors in carrying out procedure
• does not apply the scientific method when solving problems
• multiple errors in carrying out procedure
Communication Communicates scientific knowledge through writing, speech and visuals. • panels are highly organized with exceptional use of relevant details
• written and visual content is highly effective
• accurate and precise communication of data
• panels are organized with consistent use of relevant details
• written and visual content is accurate and complete
• accurate and consistent communication of data
• panels are organized with few relevant details
• limited written and visual content
• incomplete or brief data communication
• panels are unorganized with little relevant details
• written and visual content is missing
• limited or no communication of data
Total

Example Storyboard

Technologies of Today and Tomorrow by Student
The practical use of microwaves was first discovered by accident in the 1940s when a man noticed that the radiation from the radar machines he was using, melted the candy bar in his pocket. By the late 1960s, the first residential unit was sold. In the late 1970s, many households were able to purchase an oven due a significant drop is price. Today, over 90% of U.S. households have a microwave oven in their kitchen. Microwave ovens heat food by using microwave radiation. Microwaves are a form of electromagnetic radiation with a frequency higher than ordinary radio waves, but lower than infrared light. Microwave radiation can be harmful to human cells; therefore, an oven is enclosed in a metal box to protect the users. A device called a magnetron converts high voltage electrical energy into microwave radiation. As the waves pass through the food, certain molecules such as water and fat absorb the energy that is transferred from the microwaves. As the polar molecules absorb the energy, they begin to rotate and collide with other molecules, causing the energy to disperse. The polar molecules will begin to vibrate as a result, creating heat as a by-product. There are a number of different accessories that are used to improve cooking time. A turntable is used to promote even heating of the desired food item. A stirrer is a special fan that is used to help reflect microwaves to different parts of the oven. Cooking tips suggest that the more water that a food item contains, the quicker the item will cook. Generally, the nutrients contained in food are unaffected by microwave radiation.

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