Over 16 million comics and storyboards created

Free!
Pixton Comic & Storyboard Maker

Lesson Plan by Lauren Martin M.Ed.

Types of Irony

Pixton Lesson Plan on Types of Irony

Make literary devices come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
Print All

Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map
  • Photo Story
  • Comic Strip
  • Poster

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

Pixton Lesson Plan on Types of Irony
Pixton Lesson Plan on Types of Irony
Pixton Lesson Plan on Types of Irony
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

Types of Irony

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

Many people misuse the word irony. Students should be aware that in real-life, a situation is only ironic if the exact opposite of what is expected to happen in a situation, happens. In literature, this is called situational irony.

Students should also be aware of the difference between the words ironic, sarcastic, and facetious.

  • Verbal irony: Saying the opposite of what is actually meant.
  • Sarcastic: A harsh, mean, unpleasant form of irony used to insult or mock someone.
  • Facetious: A silly comment or joke not meant to be taken seriously.

**Note: Have you hard the saying, "All chocolate donuts are donuts but not all donuts are chocolate donuts"? Well, sarcastic and facetious statements are specific subgroups of verbal irony.

Opening Discussion

Introduce the three types of irony found in literature:

  • Verbal Irony: When words are used to say the opposite of what is actually meant, usually an overstatement or understatement.
  • Dramatic Irony: When the audience is aware of something that the characters in the story are not aware of.
  • Situational Irony: When the exact opposite of what is expected to happen, happens.
Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Storyboard or Mind Map
    Define Types of Irony

    Complete after opening discussion.

    View Activity
  • Make a Photo Story, Mind Map, or ...
    Types of Irony in Literature

    Complete after class discussion.

    View Activity
  • Make a Storyboard or Mind Map
    Types of Verbal Irony

    Complete to prevent potential misunderstandings of verbal irony.

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Comic Strip (Extension / Modification)

    Create a 3-4 panel Comic Strip that illustrates the use of dramatic irony in a play or novel.

  • Extension / Modification
    Poster (Extension / Modification)

    Create a Poster that illustrates both situational and verbal irony from real-life scenarios.

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Print out the Storyboards that your class created that illustrate various examples of verbal, situational, and dramatic irony. Share these with your class by rotating them around the room so that students can learn from their peers' examples of irony. You can also decorate your classroom with these assignments for future reference. Ask your class to share which examples they liked the best.

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Types of Irony 1 Define Types of Irony

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map

Intro

The three types of literary irony are:

  • Verbal Irony: When words are used to say the opposite of what is actually meant, usually an overstatement or understatement.
  • Dramatic Irony: When the audience is aware of something that the characters in the story are not aware of.
  • Situational Irony: When the exact opposite of what is expected to happen, happens.

Instructions

Create a Mind Map or Storyboard that illustrates the three types of literary irony.

Each panel should include:

  • A type of irony in the panel title
  • A definition of the type of irony
  • An appropriate illustration of a "real-life" example of irony

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Types of Irony 2 Types of Irony in Literature

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map
  • Photo Story

Intro

The three types of literary irony are:

  • Verbal Irony: When words are used to say the opposite of what is actually meant, usually an overstatement or understatement.
  • Dramatic Irony: When the audience is aware of something that the characters in the story are not aware of.
  • Situational Irony: When the exact opposite of what is expected to happen, happens.

Instructions

Create a Mind Map or Storyboard that illustrates three types of literary irony from novels or stories discussed in class.

Each panel should include:

  • The type of irony in the panel title
  • A description of one example of irony from literature
  • An appropriate illustration of the literary example of irony

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Types of Irony 3 Types of Verbal Irony

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map

Intro

Many students confuse and misuse the words ironic, sarcastic and facetious:

  • Verbal irony: Saying the opposite of what is actually meant.
  • Sarcastic: A harsh, mean, unpleasant form of irony used to insult or mock someone.
  • Facetious: A silly comment or joke not meant to be taken seriously. This is one type of verbal irony that is the opposite of sarcasm.
  • Sarcastic and facetious statements are specific subgroups of verbal irony.

Instructions

Create a Storyboard or Mind Map to illustrate the three types of literary irony.

Each panel should include:

  • The type of irony in the panel title
  • A description of each type of irony.
  • Dialogue that illustrates a specific example of irony.
  • An appropriate illustration.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Find more lesson plans:

  • MADE AT PIXTON.COM