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Lesson Plan by Lauren Martin M.Ed.

The War of 1812: “Mr. Madison’s War”

Pixton Lesson Plan on The War of 1812: “Mr. Madison’s War”

Make social studies come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
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Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map
  • Comic Strip

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings social studies to life with comics and storyboards.
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings social studies to life with comics and storyboards.
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings social studies to life with comics and storyboards.

Featured Props

The War of 1812: “Mr. Madison’s War”

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Boat
    Boat
  • Cannon
    Cannon
  • Church
    Church
  • Explosion
    Explosion
  • Field
    Field
  • Ground
    Ground
  • House
    House
  • Ship
    Ship
  • Shore
    Shore
  • Tree
    Tree
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

The War of 1812: “Mr. Madison’s War”

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

Research, review or discuss the events and causes of the War of 1812 from the below activities.

Opening Discussion

Create a KW(H)L chart for the War of 1812:

  • What do you already know about the War of 1812?
  • What do you want to know about the War of 1812?
  • How could you learn more?
Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Storyboard or Mind Map
    Causes

    Complete after class reading or discussion.

    View Activity
  • Make a Storyboard or Mind Map
    Effects

    Complete after class reading or discussion.

    View Activity
  • Make a Storyboard or Mind Map
    Major Events

    Complete after class reading or discussion.

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Comic Strip (Extension / Modification)

    Create a Comic Strip to illustrate the events and outcomes of one major battle from the War of 1812.

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Add to your KW(H)L chart for the War of 1812:

  • What did you learn about the War of 1812?
  • What was the most interesting thing you learned?
  • What was the most surprising or unexpected thing you learned?
  • How does this relate to other events, ideas or people you learned about in history?
  • What would you still like to know about the War of 1812?
  • How could you learn more?
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Pixton Activity: The War of 1812: “Mr. Madison’s War” 1 Causes

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map

Intro

Review the causes of the War of 1812:

  1. British violate U.S. neutral rights at sea by forcing Americans to work on British ships and by patrolling U.S. waters.
  2. Troubles with the British on the western frontier: Settlers had been pushing the Native Americans farther westward. Shawnee brothers, Tecumseh and Prophet united the tribes east of the Mississippi River to fight back. Americans blamed the British for providing aid to the rebellion.
  3. War Hawks: Young Republicans from frontier states who promoted war with Britain were called war hawks. A group of them, including Henry Clay and John Calhoun, were voted into Congress in 1810. They argued to the House of Representatives that war with Britain would defend American honor, gain Canada, and destroy Native American resistance.

Instructions

Create a Storyboard or Mind Map that summarizes the causes of the War of 1812:

  • Identify the cause in the panel title.
  • Write a detailed description.
  • Include an appropriate illustration for each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: The War of 1812: “Mr. Madison’s War” 2 Effects

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map

Intro

Review the effects of the War of 1812:

  1. With two victories over Britain, United States gains respect as solidified nation.
  2. The United States peacefully accepts Canada as a neighbor.
  3. Federalist's reasoning for breaking apart the Union is later used by the South.
  4. Federalist Party is terminated because no more interest in New England leaving the Union.
  5. Native Americans forced to surrender land.
  6. With limited European imports during war, U.S. built more factories and became more industrially self-sufficient.
  7. War heroes like Andrew Jackson and William Henry Harrison become next political leaders.
  8. Increased American nationalism.

Instructions

Create a Storyboard or Mind Map that summarizes the effects of the War of 1812:

  • Identify the effect in the panel title.
  • Write a detailed description.
  • Include an appropriate illustration for each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: The War of 1812: “Mr. Madison’s War” 3 Major Events

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map

Intro

Review the major events of the War of 1812:

  • June 1812: James Madison declares war on Great Britain.
  • June - August 1812: Riots break out in Baltimore and Massachusetts in protest of Madison and the war.
  • July - October 1812: U.S. unsuccessfully invades Canada three times but is forced to surrender.
  • January 1813: British aid Indian allies to rebel against American troops at the Battle of Frenchtown in Michigan. American survivors are killed the following day in the Raisin River Massacre.
  • April - October 1813: U.S. troops win three battles in the Great Lake region to shift the tide of war: They capture and burn the city of York in Toronto; Defeat the British at the Battle of Lake Erie; and defeat and kill the Native American rebellion leader, Tecumseh, at the Battle of the Thames in Canada.
  • Aug. 1814: Peace negotiations begin in Ghent.
  • Aug. 24-25, 1814: The British burn Washington, DC, including the White House, in retaliation for the burning of York. President James Madison flees the Capital and receives harsh disapproval and blame by the American people.
  • Sept. 1814: The Battle of Plattsburg on Lake Champlain is a major American victory, securing the northern border.
  • Sept. 1814: The U.S. won the Battle of Baltimore at Fort McHenry, where Francis Scott Key wrote The Star Spangled Banner.
  • Dec. 1814: The Treaty of Ghent: Americans and British diplomats agree to the treaty in America's favor. While the treaty does not address the neutral sea rights, it did allow for American Expansion in the Great Lakes region. News of the treaty does not reach America for two months.
  • January, 1815: Andrew Jackson defeats the British at the Battle of New Orleans.
  • February, 1815: The Peace Treaty is ratified, President Madison declares the war over, and he re-earns the trust and respect of the nation.

Instructions

Create a Storyboard or Mind Map that summarizes the events of the War of 1812:

  • Identify the effect in the panel title.
  • Write a detailed description.
  • Include an appropriate illustration for each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Major Events

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The character map is thoughtful; descriptions are detailed and informative. The character map is fully developed; accurate details and insightful descriptions. The character map is complete; descriptions are simple and settings are accurate. The character map includes basic details, but is not fully developed. The character map does not accurately reflect the characters.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• summary is clear and highly detailed
• descriptions are thoughtful and highly developed
• significant details that make characters unique and dynamic
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• summary is clear and accurate
• logical descriptions that clarify and develop the idea
• characters are similar; includes relevant details
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• summary is short, but accurate
• descriptions are simple and consistent
• characters similar to description
• some relevant ideas
• summary has several errors
• descriptions are brief and lack detail
• characters vaguely looks like description
• often very brief
• summary is has significant errors
• descriptions are difficult to follow
• characters do not look like description
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is clear with little variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• basic language; vague at times
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• vague, incorrect and repetitive language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence • proper organization
• panels are thoughtful and detailed
• all panels are organized or logical
• all panels are present
• most panels are organized or logical
• all panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• some panels may be missing
• panels are not organized or logical
• panels are missing
Conventions The text demonstrates standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses eloquent words, rich sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses precise words, controlled sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates standard English conventions
• uses words and phrases, telling details and sensory language to convey a vivid picture
• demonstrates some accuracy in standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • contains multiple inaccuracies in Standard English conventions of usage and mechanics
Total

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