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Lesson Plan by Lauren Martin M.Ed.

The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings mystery to life with comics and storyboards.

Make mystery come to life with comics!

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Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map
  • Character Map
  • Graphic Novel
  • Plot Diagram

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

Pixton Lesson Plan on The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings mystery to life with comics and storyboards.
Pixton Lesson Plan on The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson

Main Characters

The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson

When you import any of the activities below, you can choose to share these ready-made characters with your students.

  • Dr. Henry Jekyll from The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
    Dr. Henry Jekyll

    Respected, but secretly corrupt, doctor and friend of Lanyon and Utterson

  • Mr. Edward Hyde from The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
    Mr. Edward Hyde

    Strange, violent and seemingly less than human man, represents Jekyll’s dark side

  • Mr. Gabriel John Utterson from The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
    Mr. Gabriel John Utterson

    Respected and dignified London lawyer, embodies reason and logic over superstitions

  • Dr. Hastie Lanyon from The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
    Dr. Hastie Lanyon

    Respected London doctor, once Jekyll’s close friend, now his foil, embodies rationalism and skepticism

  • Mr. Poole from The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
    Mr. Poole

    Jekyll’s loyal butler

  • Mr. Enfield from The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
    Mr. Enfield

    Distant cousin and friend of Mr. Utterson, reserved, formal, and opposed to gossip

  • Mr. Guest from The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
    Mr. Guest

    Utterson’s clerk and confidant, who expertly examines Jekyll and Hyde’s handwriting

  • Sir Danvers Carew from The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
    Sir Danvers Carew

    Utterson's client, a likable elderly nobleman in Parliament

Featured Props

The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Beaker
    Beaker
  • Cane
    Cane
  • Cloud
    Cloud
  • Envelope
    Envelope
  • Feather
    Feather
  • House
    House
  • Lamp
    Lamp
  • Money
    Money
  • Prop Letter
    Prop Letter
  • Table
    Table
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

Have students review the front and back cover of the text, examine the cover images, read the book jacket summary, analyze the title, discuss prior knowledge of the author and/or the text itself, and make a prediction about the plot, conflicts and themes.

Opening Discussion

Have students discuss their opinion and beliefs about the following themes:

  • Every person is both good and evil (duality of human nature)
  • Surface reputation is more important than hidden identity
  • The innocent cannot escape violence
  • Language cannot articulate truth
Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Comic Strip or Storyboard
    Summarize the Plot

    Track conflict throughout reading and complete at the end of the text.

    View Activity
  • Make a Mind Map
    Themes & Symbolism

    Complete at the end of the novel.

    View Activity
  • Make a Character Map
    Character Map

    Begin at the start of reading, and make additions throughout the text.

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Graphic Novel (Extension / Modification)

    Illustrate a Graphic Novel version of the play.

  • Extension / Modification
    Plot Diagram (Extension / Modification)

    Create a Plot Diagram to illustrate the main conflicts in the play.

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Discuss the following:

  • Compare and contrast the characters in the story.
  • Were you surprised by any of the characters' motives, choices or actions? Why or why not?
  • Can you relate to any of the characters?
  • What were the main themes of the story?
  • What were the major symbols and motifs? What made them important?
  • What do you think the climax of the story was?
  • What was the author's purpose in writing this story?
  • What was the text's overall tone (author's attitude) and mood (reader's reaction)?
  • How might the context of when this text was written influence the content and themes?
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Pixton Activity: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde 1 Summarize the Plot

Featured Layouts

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard

Intro

Track main conflicts and events throughout reading to summarize the plot at the end of the text.

Instructions

Create a Comic Strip or Storyboard to summarize the main conflicts and events in the text:

  • Include brief dialogue and/or description for each event.
  • Identify the key points that are important to that specific event in the text.
  • Think about quotes that could be used to help create meaning in each panel.
  • Include an appropriate illustration.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Example Comic Strip

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde Plot Summary by Student

Here's the link to share this comic:

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Pixton Activity: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde 2 Themes & Symbolism

Featured Layouts

  • Mind Map

Intro

Discuss the symbols and themes in the text.

  • Theme: A truth about the way the world usually is or the way people usually are that is better understood after reading this text.
  • Symbol: An object that represents a deeper meaning than what is on the surface. The use of symbolic images by an author is usually used to help develop the characters and theme.

Instructions

In a Mind Map, choose two of the major symbols and/or themes and for each one, choose two examples of this symbol or theme from the text:

  • Identify the theme or symbol in the panel title
  • Write an explanation as to how the evidence enhances the symbol/theme
  • Create an image that illustrates the evidence or scene

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Themes & Symbolism

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The theme is highly developed; examples have significant purpose and are highly detailed. The theme is well developed; examples are specific and provide ample support. The theme is briefly discussed; examples are accurate but not fully explained. The theme is poorly discussed; vague or irrelevant examples. The theme is not identified; lacks any supporting examples.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is clear with little variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• basic language; vague at times
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• vague, incorrect and repetitive language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence • proper organization
• examples are properly referenced
• panels are thoughtful and detailed
• all panels are organized or logical
• examples are properly referenced
• all panels are present
• most panels are organized or logical
• examples are properly referenced
• all panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• examples are not/improperly referenced
• some panels may be missing
• panels are not organized or logical
• examples are not referenced
• panels are missing
Conventions The text demonstrates standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses eloquent words, rich sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses precise words, controlled sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates standard English conventions
• uses words and phrases, telling details and sensory language to convey a vivid picture
• demonstrates some accuracy in standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • contains multiple inaccuracies in Standard English conventions of usage and mechanics
Total
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Pixton Activity: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde 3 Character Map

Featured Layouts

  • Character Map

Intro

Determining character traits is an important skill necessary to understanding the conflicts and themes of the plot. The characteristics that make up the main character and supporting characters help shape the outcome of the narrative.

Instructions

Choose three of your favorite characters and create a Character Map for each one.

  • It's important to add as many details as you can to all the parts of the map.
  • Include an appropriate illustration based on the character traits outlined in the text.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Character Map

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The character map is thoughtful; descriptions are detailed and informative. The character map is fully developed; accurate details and insightful descriptions. The character map is complete; descriptions are simple and settings are accurate. The character map includes basic details, but is not fully developed. The character map does not accurately reflect the characters.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• summary is clear and highly detailed
• descriptions are thoughtful and highly developed
• significant details that make characters unique and dynamic
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• summary is clear and accurate
• logical descriptions that clarify and develop the idea
• characters are similar; includes relevant details
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• summary is short, but accurate
• descriptions are simple and consistent
• characters similar to description
• some relevant ideas
• summary has several errors
• descriptions are brief and lack detail
• characters vaguely looks like description
• often very brief
• summary is has significant errors
• descriptions are difficult to follow
• characters do not look like description
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is clear with little variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• basic language; vague at times
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• vague, incorrect and repetitive language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence • proper organization
• panels are thoughtful and detailed
• all panels are organized or logical
• all panels are present
• most panels are organized or logical
• all panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• some panels may be missing
• panels are not organized or logical
• panels are missing
Conventions The text demonstrates standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses eloquent words, rich sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses precise words, controlled sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates standard English conventions
• uses words and phrases, telling details and sensory language to convey a vivid picture
• demonstrates some accuracy in standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • contains multiple inaccuracies in Standard English conventions of usage and mechanics
Total

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