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Lesson Plan by Lauren Martin M.Ed.

The Once and Future King by T. H. White

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings fantasy novels to life with comics and storyboards.

Make fantasy novels come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
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Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Character Map
  • Storyboard
  • Plot Diagram
  • Graphic Novel
  • Mind Map
  • Comic Strip

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings fantasy novels to life with comics and storyboards.
Pixton Lesson Plan on The Once and Future King by T. H. White
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings fantasy novels to life with comics and storyboards.

Main Characters

The Once and Future King by T. H. White

When you import any of the activities below, you can choose to share these ready-made characters with your students.

  • King Arthur from The Once and Future King by T. H. White
    King Arthur

    Protagonist, shy young boy who becomes king of England

  • Lancelot from The Once and Future King by T. H. White
    Lancelot

    Arthur’s best knight and commander of his forces who has an affair with Arthur's queen, Guenever

  • Merlyn from The Once and Future King by T. H. White
    Merlyn

    Arthur’s tutor, friend, and magician who knows the future

  • Guenever from The Once and Future King by T. H. White
    Guenever

    Arthur’s beautiful and jealous wife, and Lancelot’s lover

  • Mordred from The Once and Future King by T. H. White
    Mordred

    Hateful and conniving son of Arthur and half-sister, Morgaus

  • Morgause from The Once and Future King by T. H. White
    Morgause

    Mother of Gawaine, Gaheris, Gareth, and Agravaine, and half-sister of Arthur who she seeks to destroy

  • Elaine from The Once and Future King by T. H. White
    Elaine

    Mother of Galahad who craftily seduces Lancelot

  • Galahad from The Once and Future King by T. H. White
    Galahad

    Lancelot and Elaine’s morally perfect and invincible son, the only knight worthy to find the Holy Grail

  • Gareth from The Once and Future King by T. H. White
    Gareth

    Morgause’s most loving and sensitive son who loves Arthur and Lancelot

  • Gawaine from The Once and Future King by T. H. White
    Gawaine

    Morgause’s oldest and strongest son who is decent but prone to the rageful vices of knighthood

  • Agravaine from The Once and Future King by T. H. White
    Agravaine

    Morgause’s cruel, deceitful and cowardly son, allied with Mordred

  • King Pellinore from The Once and Future King by T. H. White
    King Pellinore

    First knight Arthur meets who is kind and on a lifelong quest to hunt the Questing Beast

  • Sir Kay from The Once and Future King by T. H. White
    Sir Kay

    Arthur’s selfish foster brother and knight of the Round Table

  • Sir Ector from The Once and Future King by T. H. White
    Sir Ector

    Arthur’s foster father and Kay’s biological father

  • Sir Bruce Sans Pitié from The Once and Future King by T. H. White
    Sir Bruce Sans Pitié

    Evil knight and example of the old injustices that Arthur wants to eliminate

  • Uncle Dap from The Once and Future King by T. H. White
    Uncle Dap

    Lancelot’s childhood instructor and knighthood squire

  • Morgan le Fay from The Once and Future King by T. H. White
    Morgan le Fay

    Morgause’s sister, Arthur’s half-sister, and fairy queen who uses spells to torment knights and villagers

  • Nimue from The Once and Future King by T. H. White
    Nimue

    Merlyn’s lover, who traps him in a cave for centuries but promises to care for Arthur

  • Sir Thomas Malory from The Once and Future King by T. H. White
    Sir Thomas Malory

    Page who carries out Arthur's ideals of justice

  • Uther Pendragon from The Once and Future King by T. H. White
    Uther Pendragon

    Arthur's father and King of England during Arthur’s childhood

Featured Props

The Once and Future King by T. H. White

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Ant
    Ant
  • Boat
    Boat
  • Castle
    Castle
  • Chair
    Chair
  • Fish
    Fish
  • Horse
    Horse
  • Paper
    Paper
  • Rock
    Rock
  • Shield
    Shield
  • Sword
    Sword
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

The Once and Future King by T. H. White

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

Have students review the front and back cover of the book, examine the cover images, read the book jacket summary, discuss the significance of the title, and make a prediction about the content of the book.

Opening Discussion

Discuss the following:

  • What do you know about Medieval England?
  • What do you know about the culture of knighthood?
  • What is a knight's quest?
  • What do you know about the round table from medieval legends?
  • What about the holy grail?
  • What is a blood sport?
  • How was power, justice, and leadership carried out during these times?
  • What is usually included in a myth or legend?
Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Character Map
    Character Map

    Begin at the start of the text, and make additions throughout the reading.

    View Activity
  • Make a Storyboard
    Symbolism

    Track throughout the text and complete after reading.

    View Activity
  • Make a Storyboard
    Major Themes

    Complete after class reading and discussion.

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Plot Diagram (Extension / Modification)

    Create a Plot Diagram to illustrate the main events in the text.

  • Extension / Modification
    Graphic Novel (Extension / Modification)

    Illustrate a Graphic Novel version of the text.

  • Extension / Modification
    Mind Map (Extension / Modification)

    Create a Mind Map to illustrate the setting and imagery in the text.

  • Extension / Modification
    Comic Strip (Extension / Modification)

    Create a Comic Strip to illustrate examples of figurative language used in the text.

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Discuss the following:

  • Compare and contrast the characters in the story.
  • Were you surprised by any of the characters' motives, choices or actions? Why or why not?
  • What were the main themes of the story?
  • What were the major symbols and motifs? What made them important?
  • What do you think the climax of the story was?
  • What was the author's purpose in writing this story?
  • What was the text's overall tone (author's attitude) and mood (reader's reaction)?
  • How might the context of when this text was written influence the content and themes?
  • What is significant about the knight's quest, Arthur's round table and the holy grail?
  • How does magic and fantasy play an important role in the book?
  • How does myth and legend play an important role in the book?
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: The Once and Future King 1 Character Map

Featured Layouts

  • Character Map

Intro

Determining character traits is an important skill necessary to understanding the conflicts and themes of the plot. The characteristics that make up the main character and supporting characters help shape the outcome of the narrative.

Instructions

Choose three of your favorite characters from the text and create a Character Map for each one.

  • It's important to add as many details as you can to all the parts of the map.
  • Include an appropriate illustration based on the character traits outlined in the novel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Character Map

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The character map is thoughtful; descriptions are detailed and informative. The character map is fully developed; accurate details and insightful descriptions. The character map is complete; descriptions are simple and settings are accurate. The character map includes basic details, but is not fully developed. The character map does not accurately reflect the characters.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• summary is clear and highly detailed
• descriptions are thoughtful and highly developed
• significant details that make characters unique and dynamic
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• summary is clear and accurate
• logical descriptions that clarify and develop the idea
• characters are similar; includes relevant details
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• summary is short, but accurate
• descriptions are simple and consistent
• characters similar to description
• some relevant ideas
• summary has several errors
• descriptions are brief and lack detail
• characters vaguely looks like description
• often very brief
• summary is has significant errors
• descriptions are difficult to follow
• characters do not look like description
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is clear with little variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• basic language; vague at times
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• vague, incorrect and repetitive language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence • proper organization
• panels are thoughtful and detailed
• all panels are organized or logical
• all panels are present
• most panels are organized or logical
• all panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• some panels may be missing
• panels are not organized or logical
• panels are missing
Conventions The text demonstrates standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses eloquent words, rich sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses precise words, controlled sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates standard English conventions
• uses words and phrases, telling details and sensory language to convey a vivid picture
• demonstrates some accuracy in standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • contains multiple inaccuracies in Standard English conventions of usage and mechanics
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: The Once and Future King 2 Symbolism

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard

Intro

A symbol is an object that represents a deeper meaning than what is on the surface. The use of symbolic images by an author is usually used to help develop the characters and theme. A motif is a recurring idea or literary device that enhances the theme.

Instructions

In a Storyboard, illustrate at least three of the major symbols and/or motifs:

  • Identify the symbol/motif in the panel title
  • Write an explanation as to why the symbol/motif is important
  • Include an appropriate illustration

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Symbolism

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The symbolism is highly developed; examples have significant purpose and engage the reader. The symbolism is well developed; examples are specific and provide sufficient support. The symbolism is briefly discussed; examples are accurate but not fully explained. The symbolism is briefly discussed; vague or irrelevant examples. The symbolism is not identified; lacks any supporting examples.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is clear with little variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• basic language; vague at times
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• vague, incorrect and repetitive language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence (supporting examples identified) • proper organization
• examples are properly referenced
• panels are thoughtful and detailed
• all panels are organized or logical
• examples are properly referenced
• all panels are present
• most panels are organized or logical
• examples are properly referenced
• all panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• examples are not/improperly referenced
• some panels may be missing
• panels are not organized or logical
• examples are not referenced
• panels are missing
Conventions The text demonstrates standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses eloquent words, rich sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses precise words, controlled sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates standard English conventions
• uses words and phrases, telling details and sensory language to convey a vivid picture
• demonstrates some accuracy in standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • contains multiple inaccuracies in Standard English conventions of usage and mechanics
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: The Once and Future King 3 Major Themes

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard

Intro

Discuss the themes in the text. Ask students to identify what truths about life or people they understood better after reading this text.

Instructions

In a Storyboard, illustrate at least three of the major themes:

  • Write the theme in the panel title
  • Create an image that summarizes the theme
  • Include dialogue or a description that fits the theme

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Major Themes

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The theme is highly developed; examples have significant purpose and are highly detailed. The theme is well developed; examples are specific and provide ample support. The theme is briefly discussed; examples are accurate but not fully explained. The theme is poorly discussed; vague or irrelevant examples. The theme is not identified; lacks any supporting examples.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is clear with little variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• basic language; vague at times
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• vague, incorrect and repetitive language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence • proper organization
• examples are properly referenced
• panels are thoughtful and detailed
• all panels are organized or logical
• examples are properly referenced
• all panels are present
• most panels are organized or logical
• examples are properly referenced
• all panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• examples are not/improperly referenced
• some panels may be missing
• panels are not organized or logical
• examples are not referenced
• panels are missing
Conventions The text demonstrates standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses eloquent words, rich sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses precise words, controlled sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates standard English conventions
• uses words and phrases, telling details and sensory language to convey a vivid picture
• demonstrates some accuracy in standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • contains multiple inaccuracies in Standard English conventions of usage and mechanics
Total

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