Over 16 million comics and storyboards created

Free!
Pixton Comic & Storyboard Maker

Lesson Plan by Christina Bouwens M.A.

The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street

Pixton Lesson Plan on The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street

Make Science Fiction come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
Print All

Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard
  • Plot Diagram
  • Timeline
  • Character Map
  • Mind Map
  • Photo Story

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings Science Fiction to life with comics and storyboards.
Pixton Lesson Plan on The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings Science Fiction to life with comics and storyboards.

Featured Props

The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Hill
    Hill
  • House
    House
  • Mower
    Mower
  • Prop Station Wagon
    Prop Station Wagon
  • Pump
    Pump
  • Radio
    Radio
  • Road
    Road
  • Rock
    Rock
  • Skyline
    Skyline
  • Sparkles
    Sparkles
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

What is Science Fiction (aka. "Sci Fi")?

Introduce this genre with any and all of the following:

  1. Brief 4 minute video on Vimeo here

  2. Article on Science Fiction and its power + insight into Fahrenheit 451 Neil Gaiman

  3. Short 1 minute Science Fiction Genre YouTube video

  4. Read|Write|Think "Definition of Science Fiction" single-page article

  5. Education Place's "Characteristics of Science Fiction" single-pager

Opening Discussion

  1. Class discussion of the following:

    • What Science Fiction television shows, movies, or stories can you think of, now that we've reviewed the genre?
    • What do you like or dislike about such stories?
  2. In a Google document or other, journal about the following:

    • Does fear ever affect your decision-making? In what way(s)? How/how not? (specific examples, if possible)
    • Do you think most people believe in life forms on other planets? Do you think most feel such life is hostile? Friendly? Why?
    • Do you feel people behave differently when on part of a team or in a group than when separate or on their own? How/how not or in what way(s)? (specific examples, if possible)
  3. Whole class discussion reviewing and sharing impressions on the journal prompt.

  4. If Science Fiction-Fantasy writer Neil Gaiman is correct, and Science Fiction attempts to address any or all of the following questions, let's consider which -- if any -- the television episode &/or play (script) of The Twilight Zone's "The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street" attempts to address:
    • "What if?"
    • "If only?"
    • "If this goes on..."
Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Do you agree with the aliens as they are portrayed in the storyline, that they see humans as easily manipulated or coerced? In what ways? What historical or literary examples can you think of that seem to align with this idea? Which can you think of which disagree with this concept?

What do you imagine to be the aliens' ultimate plan on Maple Street, and beyond? Why do you say this?

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street 1 Plot Mapping

Featured Layouts

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard
  • Plot Diagram
  • Timeline

Intro

Plot is the narrative or "story" of a literary work, and it is driven by conflict.

The conflict can be one of two types:

  • Internal Conflict: main character struggles with something within him/herself (human vs. self)
  • External Conflict: main character struggles with someone or something other than him or herself
    • human vs. human
    • human vs. nature
    • human vs. technology
    • human vs. God/Supernatural

Conflict drives the plot, moving readers through these stages (not necessarily always in this order):

  1. Exposition: main characters, conflict, and setting (time & place) are established

  2. Rising Action Events: events building the conflict; in other words, which things happen to further complicate the main problem (conflict)

  3. Climax (Climactic Event): an event which is the turning point of the narrative; oftentimes, the climax is the highest point of tension or suspense in the storyline

  4. Falling Action Events: events which move the narrative from the climax toward a resolution of the conflict

  5. Resolution (also called Denouement): the end result or how the conflict ends. To put it directly: who or what wins? What is the final result?

Instructions

Identify the following in your comic, including specific detail & quotes:

  1. What appears to be the Main Conflict?

    • Internal or External Conflict? Human vs. (Fill in the Blank)
  2. The Setting (Time & Place) and protagonist as well as the antagonist.

  3. At least 2 Rising Action events

  4. The Climax

  5. 1 Falling Action event

  6. The Resolution (who wins? How/why?)

Rubric: Plot Mapping

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview Each panel is detailed with accurate content and fully responds to the prompts, along with a corresponding image; relevant details/quotes provided to support each plot point. Each panel has accurate content appropriate to the prompts, along with corresponding images; relevant details/quotes are selected to support each plot point. Each panel has content mostly appropriate to the prompts, and corresponding images; details/quotes from the script are mostly relevant and utilized to support each plot point. One or more panels missing appropriate content and/or corresponding images; details/quotes from the script not entirely relevant and/or included for each plot point. Some panels missing content and/or corresponding images; details/quotes from the script somewhat incomplete or irrelevant to plot points.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of appropriate textual detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is clear with little variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• basic language; vague at times
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• vague, incorrect and repetitive language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence (supporting examples identified) • proper organization
• text/details are properly referenced
• panels are thoughtful and detailed, fully addressing required content
• all panels are organized or logical
• text/details are properly referenced
• all panels are present and detailed
• most panels are organized or logical
• text/details are properly referenced
• all necessary panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• text/details are not/improperly referenced
• minimal use of panels &/or some panels appear to be missing
• panels are disorganized or illogical (flow doesn't work)
• text/details are not referenced
• panels do not seem to be targeting required content
Conventions The text demonstrates standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses eloquent words, rich sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses precise words, controlled sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates standard English conventions
• uses words and phrases, telling details and sensory language to convey a vivid picture
• demonstrates some accuracy in standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • contains multiple inaccuracies in Standard English conventions of usage and mechanics
Total

Example Timeline

Plot Mapping in The Monsters Are Due on Maple Stree by Student
ExpositionWe are in American suburbia ca. 1960 on a street called Maple Street. It is "Late Summer" and exactly 6:43pm. We meet Steve Brand, his wife, and Don who all comment on a "roar" they've all heard. They determine it was a meteor.
ConflictThe conflict initially appears to be the townspeople (society) vs. some kind of technological glitch. It seems to be People Vs. Society, but we see this quickly shift into Steve vs. Society and possibly even Society vs. Itself.
Rising Action EventsAs Steve puts it, "A little power failure and right away we all get flustered and everything." Quickly, it becomes much more than this.

Steve goes to drive downtown to see what's going on, and realizes his car is dead.

Steve and Charlie plan to walk downtown, when Tommy says they "better not," and explains that he thinks the aliens or whomever is behind the power failures are preventing us from leaving Maple Street.
ClimaxThe turning point of this story is where Charlie unwittingly murders one of their own, bringing the conflict of society vs. itself to a full tilt. Mr. and Mrs. Brand along with the rest of the neighborhood are horrified: it has come to this. Though Charlie didn't intend to kill a friend, he armed himself and acted out of fear, thinking it was an alien.
Falling Action Events Now Charlie is a suspect, as he seemed overly "eager" to kill, and killed an innocent man. Society really turns on itself in these moments leading up to the finale where we meet the aliens. Charlie blames Tommy. Steve wonders what's happened to them all. Mass hysteria ensues.
Resolution The denouement or resolution is the aliens reviewing that everything went along to protocol: the humans turned on each other, making theirs easy work. Indeed, they say "[a]ll we need to do is sit back ... and watch." We learn that this was never a direct conflict of alien vs. humans, but of aliens vs. society which established the society vs. itself conflict. This brief script is a tricky one in this way!

Here's the link to share this comic:

Student Handout

Share this comic with your students to demonstrate the activity without giving away the farm :)

Conflict and Plot in “Cinderella” by Pixton
ExpositionCinderella lives a humble life with her father, and is very happy. However, soon after taking a new wife, Cinderella's father passes away. Main ConflictWith her new husband now deceased, Lady Tremaine and her two daughters take over the house. Rather than welcoming Cinderella into the family, they make her a servant and treat her cruelly. Rising ActionThe Prince, looking to get married, announces there will be a ball for all the ladies in the kingdom to attend. Cinderella plans to go but her stepsisters ruin her dress. As she sits in tears, her fairy godmother appears and gives her everything she needs for a grand experience at the ball. But there is a catch; at midnight, everything will return to how it was before. ClimaxCinderella enters the ballroom and immediately catches Prince Charming's eye. After a night of dancing, the two are in love. Cinderella loses track of time, however, and when the clock strikes midnight, she flees from the ball. Prince Charming is left with nothing but her glass slipper. Falling ActionThe prince is determined to find the mysterious woman from the ball. He sends his men to visit every household in the kingdom and have them try on the glass slipper. The woman whom the shoe fits will be the new princess. DenouementAt last, Cinderella gets a chance to try on the glass slipper and it fits perfectly. Prince Charming knows she is the one he fell in love with at the ball. He rescues her from her wicked stepfamily and they live happily ever after.
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street 2 Character Mapping

Featured Layouts

  • Character Map

Intro

When we Character Map, we engage more deeply with a literary figure. We can then "view" him or her with a different focus as we analyze that character's internal and external traits.

External Characteristics or Traits: a character's appearance

Internal Characteristics or Traits: a character's thoughts or emotions which lead to his or her behaviors

Instructions

Analyze a character from The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street.

Draw from the script character behaviors, relationships, dialogue, etc. to thoughtfully respond to each character map panel:

  1. External Characteristics: what do we know about this character's physical appearance? Provide at least 2 details.

  2. Internal Characteristics / Personality Traits: how does this character behave? What adjectives define him or her? Support with at least 3 specific details.

  3. Relations to Others: what kinds of relations does this character have with others? Identify at least 2 facts &/or descriptors.

  4. Important Quotes: provide at least 2 quotes used to describe your character, or statements he or she makes which you believe to be significant and could easily prove as such.

Rubric: Character Mapping

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview Each panel is detailed with accurate content and fully responds to the prompts, along with an image that corresponds well to the character as he or she is developed upon from the script; relevant details are selected to support each quotation. Each panel has accurate content and responds well to the prompts, along with an image that corresponds to the character as developed upon from the script; relevant details are selected to support each quotation. Each panel has content which seems to adequately address the prompts. An image is provided with little detail to the script's character; details are not entirely clear for the quotations as textual support. Each panel has content which minimally addresses the prompts. An image is provided but lacks detail to the character or setting; details are lacking or are unclear for the quotations as textual support. One or more panels is missing appropriate content, or each very minimally addresses the prompts. An image is provided with little to no detail (character or setting); textual support is minimal or missing in each of the quotations.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of appropriate textual detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is clear with little variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• basic language; vague at times
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• vague, incorrect and repetitive language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence (supporting examples identified) • proper organization
• text/details are properly referenced
• panels are thoughtful and detailed, fully addressing required content
• all panels are organized or logical
• text/details are properly referenced
• all panels are present and detailed
• most panels are organized or logical
• text/details are properly referenced
• all necessary panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• text/details are not/improperly referenced
• minimal use of panels &/or some panels appear to be missing
• panels are disorganized or illogical (flow doesn't work)
• text/details are not referenced
• panels do not seem to be targeting required content
Conventions The text demonstrates standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses eloquent words, rich sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses precise words, controlled sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates standard English conventions
• uses words and phrases, telling details and sensory language to convey a vivid picture
• demonstrates some accuracy in standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • contains multiple inaccuracies in Standard English conventions of usage and mechanics
Total

Example Character Map

Steve in The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street by Student
Physical Appearance- White American male

- Likely near middle-age (perhaps late 40s)

- Lives in a suburban neighborhood in the 60s in America, so likely fairly well-dressed and middle class
Personality Traits- Thoughtful, not quick to judge others

- Tries to feign optimism and calm to help everyone else in the neighborhood when the panic begins to settle in.

- Provides some comic relief suggesting they test everyone to ensure there are no aliens among them; looking out for others.

- Steve is always the last to jump to conclusions and the first to try to keep the peace, the sanity.
Relations to OthersSteve seems to be the protagonist, as the story begins and somewhat ends with him as the center: everyone interacts with Steve, and we see him as someone others reach out to with their concerns right from the start with the power loss.

Steve is the first to offer to "go downtown" to attempt to "straight out" the loss of power to the street. He takes the lead with his neighborhood.

Steve "forces his voice to remain gentle" when speaking with the 14 year old Tommy.

Steve is married (we don't know her name).

Steve teases Charlie but finally gets tired of his finger-pointing and the madness he's helping create.
Important Quotations"It isn't just the power failure, Charlie. It it was, we'd still be able to get a broadcast on the portable."

"It couldn't be the meteor. A meteor couldn't do this."

"Wait a minute ... wait a minute! Let's not be a mob!"

"That's exactly what it is -- some kind of madness."

Here's the link to share this comic:

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street 3 Theme Analysis

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map
  • Photo Story

Intro

Theme is sort of the "SO WHAT?" question of a work of literature. It is the underlying meaning or main idea of a text.

  • Theme is larger than identifying the topic or subject of a literary work. Rather, a theme is a statement about the topic or subject.

  • While a topic could be friendship, a theme on this topic might be "Anyone can be friends: it just takes mutual respect and being willing to step into someone else's shoes," or "Friends make the worst enemies," and so forth.

Instructions

Identify at least two major themes in "The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street," creating at a minimum of one panel per theme to accomplish the following:

Panels to include~

  1. A scene or image which depicts the theme, including any character(s).
  2. A detailed statement written in your own words: what is the theme? (x2)
  3. Relevant details to support or "prove" each theme (i.e. specific words or phrases).
  4. Any additional detail you feel helps support your thematic analysis.

Rubric: Theme Analysis

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview Two themes are accurately identified and highly developed from the script; relevant scenes and details are provided in support of both thematic statements, including quotations. Two themes are accurately identified and sufficiently explained based on the script; some sections and detail provided to support each thematic statement. Two themes are identified but either somewhat unclearly or seem a bit under-developed from the script; sections and details do not seem to fully support each thematic statement and may not include quotation(s). Two themes are somewhat unclearly identified and/or undeveloped from the script; sections and detail missing from the novel to appropriately support each thematic statement. Quotations missing. One or both themes not clearly or fully identified/developed upon from the script; sections, details &/or quotations to support each thematic statement are missing.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of appropriate textual detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is clear with little variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• basic language; vague at times
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• vague, incorrect and repetitive language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence (supporting examples identified) • proper organization
• text/details are properly referenced
• panels are thoughtful and detailed, fully illustrating each thematic statement
• all panels are organized or logical
• text/details are properly referenced
• all panels are present and detailed
• most panels are organized or logical
• text/details are properly referenced
• all necessary panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• text/details are not/improperly referenced
• minimal use of panels &/or some panels appear to be missing
• panels are disorganized or illogical (flow doesn't work)
• text/details are not referenced
• panels do not appear to fully illustrate themes
Conventions The text demonstrates standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses eloquent words, rich sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses precise words, controlled sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates standard English conventions
• uses words and phrases, telling details and sensory language to convey a vivid picture
• demonstrates some accuracy in standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • contains multiple inaccuracies in Standard English conventions of usage and mechanics
Total

Find more lesson plans:

  • MADE AT PIXTON.COM