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Lesson Plan by Lauren Martin M.Ed.

The History of the Holocaust

Pixton Lesson Plan on The History of the Holocaust

Make world history come to life with comics!

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Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map
  • Character Map
  • Poster

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The History of the Holocaust

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  • Fire
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Teacher Guide

The History of the Holocaust

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

Research, review or discuss the events and causes of the Holocaust from the below activities.

Opening Discussion

Create a KW(H)L chart for the Holocaust:

  • What do you already know about the Holocaust?
  • What do you want to know about the Holocaust?
  • How could you learn more?
Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Storyboard or Mind Map
    Holocaust Terms & Concepts

    Complete after discussion, reading or research.

    View Activity
  • Make a Storyboard or Mind Map
    Major Events

    Complete after discussion, reading or research.

    View Activity
  • Make a Character Map
    Hitler & Mein Kampf

    Complete after class reading, discussion or research.

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Character Map (Extension / Modification)

    Create a Character Map for one or more important historical figures from the Holocaust.

  • Extension / Modification
    Poster (Extension / Modification)

    Research one major event leading up to the Holocaust and report your findings on a Poster.

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Add to your KW(H)L chart for the Holocaust:

  • What did you learn about the Holocaust?
  • What was the most interesting thing you learned?
  • What was the most surprising or unexpected thing you learned?
  • How does this relate to other events, ideas or people you learned about in history?
  • What would you still like to know about the Holocaust?
  • How could you learn more?
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Pixton Activity: The History of the Holocaust 1 Holocaust Terms & Concepts

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map

Intro

Review main terms and concepts of the Holocaust:

  • Indoctrination: Teaching a specific ideology or point of view to manipulate German youth to view Jews and other people as inferior to the Aryan race.
  • Anti-Semitism: Prejudice against Jewish people.
  • Aryan Race: During the Holocaust, Hitler believed only people of German or Aryan blood should live or have rights in Germany. He believed Aryan (blonde hair, blue eyes) Germans were superior to all races and Jewish people living in Germany were inferior to "true" Aryan Germans.
  • Propaganda: Advertised information, usually biased, used to promote or publicize a biased political cause or point of view.
  • Genocide: The systematic, mass extermination of an entire national, racial, political, or cultural group.
  • Concentration Camp: Camps where Jewish people were imprisoned, provided inadequate food and living conditions, and forced to work or await mass execution.
  • Nationalism: Feelings of pride, loyalty, and superiority through national identity.
  • Nazism: A set of political beliefs of the Nazi Party regime that led Germany. It started in the 1920s, gained power in 1933 with the Third Reich and lasted until 1945, the end of World War II. It promoted racist nationalism, national expansion, totalitarian government, fascism and state control of the economy.
  • Third Reich: The name given by the Nazis to their government in Germany; Reich is German for “empire.” Adolf Hitler believed that he was creating a third German empire, a successor to the Holy Roman Empire and the German empire formed by Chancellor Bismarck in the nineteenth century.

Instructions

Create a Mind Map or Storyboard to illustrate the main terms and concepts of the Holocaust:

  • Identify the concept in the panel title.
  • Write a detailed description of the concept.
  • Include an appropriate illustration for each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

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Pixton Activity: The History of the Holocaust 2 Major Events

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map

Intro

Review major events leading up to the Holocaust:

  • Treaty of Versailles: The treaty that ended World War I forced Germany to admit full responsibility for starting the war and to pay $132 billion in reparations. It also forbade them from creating an air force or having an army of over 100,000 soldiers.
  • Mein Kampf Published: Adolph Hitler's widely read political manifesto that outlined his goals to bring Germany back to a state of glory, and blamed Germany’s struggles on the Jewish race. he said Germany needed to “purify” itself from Jewish “parasites”.
  • Hitler was chosen to be Chancellor of Germany. He created a one-party state and expanded the state police force to punish any opponents to the Nazi party.
  • Government-ordered boycott of Jewish businesses: For one day, Nazi Stormtroopers (SA) prevented anyone from entering Jewish businesses.
  • Jewish Book Burning: The Nazi German Student Association burned every “un-German” book and any book written by a Jewish author.
  • Nuremberg: Nazis created laws to carry out Hitler's plan to rid Germany of Jews. They stripped Jews of their German citizenship; removed all Jews from government positions and public office; and made marriage and relations between Germans and Jews illegal.
  • Night of Broken Glass (Kristallnacht): 267 synagogues and Jewish businesses were destroyed.
  • Warsaw Ghetto: Nazis ordered 500,000 Jews in Poland to be removed from society and confined to a small Ghetto. They were later moved to concentration camps.
  • Auschwitz: 1.3 million Jews were imprisoned in this concentration camp (one of many). They were confined in crowded barracks, forced to work, given little to no food and punished and killed for minor "infractions". 1.1 million were murdered in gas chambers between 1942 and 1945.

Instructions

Create a Mind Map or Storyboard to illustrate the major events leading up to the Holocaust:

  • Identify the event in the panel title.
  • Write a detailed description of the event.
  • Include an appropriate illustration for each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Example Storyboard

Holocaust Major Causes by Student
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Pixton Activity: The History of the Holocaust 3 Hitler & Mein Kampf

Featured Layouts

  • Character Map

Intro

Read the history of Hitler's life and the full text of his public manifesto, Mein Kampf (available online).

Instructions

Create a Character Map to illustrate Hitler's main ideologies, atrocities, and history:

  • It's important to add as many details as you can to all the parts of the map.
  • Include quotes or main ideas from Hitler's "Mein Kampf"
  • Include an appropriate illustration based on the character's accomplishments. See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Hitler & Mein Kampf

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The setting map is thoughtful; descriptions are detailed and informative. The setting map is fully developed; accurate details and insightful descriptions. The setting map is complete; descriptions are simple and settings are accurate. The setting map includes basic details but is not fully developed. The setting map does not accurately reflect the characters.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• summary is clear and highly detailed
• descriptions are thoughtful and highly developed
• significant details that make setting unique and dynamic
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• summary is clear and accurate
• logical descriptions that clarify and develop the idea
• setting is similar; includes relevant details
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• summary is short, but accurate
• descriptions are simple and consistent
• setting similar to description
• some relevant ideas
• summary has several errors
• descriptions are brief and lack detail
• setting vaguely looks like description
• often very brief
• summary is has significant errors
• descriptions are difficult to follow
• setting does not look like description
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• setting and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• setting and characters have purpose and significance
• language is clear with little variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• setting and characters are basic, but have purpose
• basic language; vague at times
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• setting and characters have minimal development
• vague, incorrect and repetitive language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• setting and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence • proper organization
• panels are thoughtful and detailed
• all panels are organized or logical
• all panels are present
• most panels are organized or logical
• all panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• some panels may be missing
• panels are not organized or logical
• panels are missing
Conventions The text demonstrates standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses eloquent words, rich sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses precise words, controlled sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates standard English conventions
• uses words and phrases, telling details and sensory language to convey a vivid picture
• demonstrates some accuracy in standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • contains multiple inaccuracies in Standard English conventions of usage and mechanics
Total

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