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Lesson Plan by Lauren Martin M.Ed.

The Crucible by Arthur Miller

Pixton Lesson Plan on The Crucible by Arthur Miller

Make elements of a story come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
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Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Plot Diagram
  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map
  • Character Map
  • Graphic Novel
  • Poster

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings elements of a story to life with comics and storyboards.
Pixton Lesson Plan on The Crucible by Arthur Miller
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings elements of a story to life with comics and storyboards.

Main Characters

The Crucible by Arthur Miller

When you import any of the activities below, you can choose to share these ready-made characters with your students.

  • John Proctor from The Crucible by Arthur Miller
    John Proctor

    Tragic hero and Salem farmer

  • Abigail Williams from The Crucible by Arthur Miller
    Abigail Williams

    Former mistress of John Proctor, and leader of accusations

  • Reverend John Hale from The Crucible by Arthur Miller
    Reverend John Hale

    Young minister and supposed expert on witchcraft

  • Elizabeth Proctor from The Crucible by Arthur Miller
    Elizabeth Proctor

    John Proctor’s wife

  • Reverend Parris from The Crucible by Arthur Miller
    Reverend Parris

    Salem church's minister

  • Betty Parris from The Crucible by Arthur Miller
    Betty Parris

    Reverend Parris’s ten-year-old daughter who falls ill

  • Francis Nurse from The Crucible by Arthur Miller
    Francis Nurse

    Wealthy, respected, influential man in Salem

  • Rebecca Nurse from The Crucible by Arthur Miller
    Rebecca Nurse

    Francis Nurse’s wife, well-respected until accused of witchcraft

  • Judge Danforth from The Crucible by Arthur Miller
    Judge Danforth

    Lead Judge in Salem's witch trials

  • Judge Hathorne from The Crucible by Arthur Miller
    Judge Hathorne

    Another judge in Salem's witch trials

  • Giles Corey from The Crucible by Arthur Miller
    Giles Corey

    Elderly, outspoken farmer who files many lawsuits

  • Martha Corey from The Crucible by Arthur Miller
    Martha Corey

    Giles’s wife, accused of witchcraft

  • Thomas Putnam from The Crucible by Arthur Miller
    Thomas Putnam

    Wealthy, influential man who accuses many to increase his own wealth

  • Ann Putnam from The Crucible by Arthur Miller
    Ann Putnam

    Thomas Putnam’s wife

  • Ruth Putnam from The Crucible by Arthur Miller
    Ruth Putnam

    The Putnams’ only surviving child out of eight

  • Tituba from The Crucible by Arthur Miller
    Tituba

    Reverend Parris’s slave from Barbados who perform voodoo for Abigail

  • Mary Warren from The Crucible by Arthur Miller
    Mary Warren

    The Proctor's servant and part of Abigail's group of girls

  • Mercy Lewis from The Crucible by Arthur Miller
    Mercy Lewis

    One of the girls in Abigail’s group

  • Ezekiel Cheever from The Crucible by Arthur Miller
    Ezekiel Cheever

    Clerk of the court during the witch trials

  • Herrick from The Crucible by Arthur Miller
    Herrick

    Marshal of Salem

Featured Props

The Crucible by Arthur Miller

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Book
    Book
  • Booth
    Booth
  • Church
    Church
  • Cross
    Cross
  • Gavel
    Gavel
  • House
    House
  • Paper
    Paper
  • Rope
    Rope
  • Stage
    Stage
  • Tree
    Tree
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

The Crucible by Arthur Miller

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

It is important for students to understand the historical context of The Crucible: In 1692, in Salem, Massachusetts, several girls experienced hallucinations and seizures. The Puritan of Salem blamed the devil for these otherwise unexplainable events. The girls, and many innocent Salem villagers, were accused of witchcraft and consorting with the devil. An atmosphere of hysteria broke loose when people began accusing anyone they disliked, envied or simply mistrusted as different. The Massachusetts government, which was influenced by religion, imprisoned many for witchcraft. Nineteen people (and two dogs) were hanged for witchcraft. Explain that The Crucible is a play, as opposed to a traditional novel, written by Arthur Miller.

Opening Discussion

Discuss the following

  • What do you know about Puritan settlers?
  • What do you already know about the Salem witch hunts?
  • Review the following themes and make a prediction about the content of the book:
    • Society's intolerance for diversity
    • Hysteria overpowers logic
    • Self-preservation is a stronger force than morality
    • Reputation is valued over reality
Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Plot Diagram
    Conflict and Plot

    Complete at the end of the novel.

    View Activity
  • Make a Storyboard or Mind Map
    Major Themes

    Complete at the end of the novel.

    View Activity
  • Make a Character Map
    Character Map

    Begin at the start of the novel, and make additions throughout the unit.

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Graphic Novel (Extension / Modification)

    Create a short Graphic Novel to summarize the play.

  • Extension / Modification
    Poster (Extension / Modification)

    Complete a research project on the Salem witch trials and showcase photographs and facts on a large Poster.

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Discuss the following:

  • Since the unbelievable events of The Crucible are based on reality, how do you think a society succumbs to such hysteria?
  • Do you think modern society is capable of or has already experienced a similar "witch hunt"? Why or why not?
  • In your opinion, do you think you would act out of self-preservation as opposed to morality or loyalty? Why or why not?
  • What is frightening about reading the events in The Crucible?
  • How is The Crucible a "cautionary tale"?
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Pixton Activity: The Crucible 1 Conflict and Plot

Featured Layouts

  • Plot Diagram

Intro

Track major plot points while reading in order to complete the plot mountain at the end of the novel.

Instructions

Summarize The Crucible using a Plot Diagram:

  • Include a brief description and an illustration of each point on the plot diagram (introduction, rising action, climax, falling action, conclusion).
  • Identify the key points that are important to that specific point in the story.
  • Think about quotes that could be used to help create meaning in each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Conflict and Plot

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The plot diagram is focused, with advanced use of language/ideas. The plot diagram is accurate, well developed, with consistent use of details. The plot diagram is complete and accurate; lacks consistent use of specific details. The plot diagram is basic; has several errors,or lacks detail. The plot diagram is inaccurate and difficult to follow.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• summary is clear and highly detailed
• descriptions are thoughtful and highly developed
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• summary is clear and accurate
• logical descriptions that clarify and develop the idea
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• summary is short, but accurate
• descriptions are simple and consistent
• some relevant ideas
• summary has several errors
• descriptions are brief and lack detail
• often very brief
• summary is has significant errors
• descriptions are difficult to follow
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • varies language to develop meaning
• varies sentence structure for effect
• images and characters have impact on the meaning of the panel
• language is clear with some variety
• varies sentence structure
• makes attempts to use descriptive language
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is clear with little variety
• basic sentence structure with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• basic language; vague at times
• some variety in sentence length and type
• images and characters have minimal development
• vague, incorrect and repetitive language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence (beginning, middle, end) • proper organization
• sequence is highly effective and has purpose
• all panels are thoughtful and detailed
• all panels are organized or logical
• logical sequence
• all panels are present
• most panels are organized or logical
• consistent attention to sequence
• all panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• some attention to sequence
• some panels may be missing
• panels are not organized or logical
• no attention to sequence
• panels are missing
Conventions The text demonstrates standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses eloquent words, rich sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses precise words, controlled sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates standard English conventions
• uses words and phrases, telling details and sensory language to convey a vivid picture
• demonstrates some accuracy in standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • contains multiple inaccuracies in Standard English conventions of usage and mechanics
Total

Example Plot Diagram

Conflict and Plot in "The Crucible" by Student
ExpositionBetty Parris is sick with an illness that seems to be “unnatural.” People are suggesting that it might be witchcraft. Her father, the Reverend Parris, doesn’t want to believe it, but the night before, he caught his niece Abigail, his daughter Betty, and some other town girls dancing in the forest.
He does not mention this to anybody to protect them and his own career.
Main ConflictAbigail, a deceitful character, blames Tituba for witchcraft and threatens her friends to lie about the truth and accuse other innocent women of witchcraft. Tituba confesses to witchcraft and accuses many other women in Salem to save her own life. The cycle of accusations begins, which turns into complete hysteria. Rising ActionThe witch hysteria heigtens as more women are arrested. If they confess, they are ironically released. The girls start accusing outcasts but then begin accusing religious and respectable women, like Rebecca Nurse and Martha Corey. Elizabeth Proctor asks her husband to end the hysteria by telling the court the truth, but it's too late. Abigail accuses Elizabeth Proctor, who is arrested. ClimaxJohn Proctor tries to get his wife released from jail by having Mary Warren confess that she was lying. She fails to reenact her fake hysteria so the other girls pretend that Mary is bewitching them. After her failed confession, John Proctor admits to adultery with Abigail. She denies it. To save herself, Mary Warren suddenly accuses Proctor of making her sign her name in Satan’s book, but is now with God again. John Proctor is arrested as a witch. Falling ActionOn the day he is scheduled to hang from the gallows, Elizabeth and John Proctor discuss whether he should confess to save his life. Elizabeth pleads with him to forget his reputation and confess.
DenouementProctor realizes that in order to confess, he has to sign his name to a written document, and accuse his friends of witchcraft. He can't ruin his friend's reputations with a false confession. He decides not to confess. While he is sentenced to death, in his own eyes, he has redeemed himself as a good man.

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Pixton Activity: The Crucible 2 Major Themes

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map

Intro

Review the major themes:

  • Society's intolerance for diversity
  • Hysteria overpowers logic
  • Self-preservation is a stronger force than morality
  • Reputation is valued over reality

Instructions

For each major theme, identify at least two examples in the novel and depict them in a Mind Map or Storyboard:

  • Identify the theme in the Mind Map title
  • Briefly describe the scene in the panel title
  • Create an image that summarizes the scene
  • Include a quote or specific example that fits the theme

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Major Themes

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The theme is highly developed; examples have significant purpose and are highly detailed. The theme is well developed; examples are specific and provide ample support. The theme is briefly discussed; examples are accurate but not fully explained. The theme is poorly discussed; vague or irrelevant examples. The theme is not identified; lacks any supporting examples.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is clear with little variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• basic language; vague at times
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• vague, incorrect and repetitive language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence • proper organization
• examples are properly referenced
• panels are thoughtful and detailed
• all panels are organized or logical
• examples are properly referenced
• all panels are present
• most panels are organized or logical
• examples are properly referenced
• all panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• examples are not/improperly referenced
• some panels may be missing
• panels are not organized or logical
• examples are not referenced
• panels are missing
Conventions The text demonstrates standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses eloquent words, rich sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses precise words, controlled sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates standard English conventions
• uses words and phrases, telling details and sensory language to convey a vivid picture
• demonstrates some accuracy in standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • contains multiple inaccuracies in Standard English conventions of usage and mechanics
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: The Crucible 3 Character Map

Featured Layouts

  • Character Map

Intro

Determining character traits is an important skill necessary to understanding the conflicts and themes of the plot. The characteristics that make up the main character and supporting characters help shape the outcome of the narrative.

Instructions

Choose three of your favorite characters from The Crucible and create a Character Map for each one.

  • It's important to add as many details as you can to all the parts of the map.
  • Include an appropriate illustration based on the character traits outlined in the novel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Character Map

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The character map is thoughtful; descriptions are detailed and informative. The character map is fully developed; accurate details and insightful descriptions. The character map is complete; descriptions are simple and settings are accurate. The character map includes basic details, but is not fully developed. The character map does not accurately reflect the characters.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• summary is clear and highly detailed
• descriptions are thoughtful and highly developed
• significant details that make characters unique and dynamic
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• summary is clear and accurate
• logical descriptions that clarify and develop the idea
• characters are similar; includes relevant details
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• summary is short, but accurate
• descriptions are simple and consistent
• characters similar to description
• some relevant ideas
• summary has several errors
• descriptions are brief and lack detail
• characters vaguely looks like description
• often very brief
• summary is has significant errors
• descriptions are difficult to follow
• characters do not look like description
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is clear with little variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• basic language; vague at times
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• vague, incorrect and repetitive language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence • proper organization
• panels are thoughtful and detailed
• all panels are organized or logical
• all panels are present
• most panels are organized or logical
• all panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• some panels may be missing
• panels are not organized or logical
• panels are missing
Conventions The text demonstrates standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses eloquent words, rich sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses precise words, controlled sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates standard English conventions
• uses words and phrases, telling details and sensory language to convey a vivid picture
• demonstrates some accuracy in standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • contains multiple inaccuracies in Standard English conventions of usage and mechanics
Total

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