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Lesson Plan by Cassie Bermel B. Ed.

Technology Overload

Pixton Lesson Plan on Technology Overload

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Pixton Lesson Plan on Technology Overload
Pixton Lesson Plan on Technology Overload
Pixton Lesson Plan on Technology Overload

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Technology Overload

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  • Computer
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  • Controller
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  • Ipad
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  • Monitor
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  • Monitor
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Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

Technology Overload

Step 1Class discussion with students
  • Ask students to think about what life was like before the Internet. Have them write down all the differences they can think of, and then share answers with a partner.

  • Poll the class: Aside from sleeping, who has gone more than two hours without touching their cell phone in the last day? The last week? The last month?

  • Ask students “Do you think we, as a society, are addicted to technology?” Give students time to talk in partners or small groups and then share with class.

  • Define narcissism. Ask students if they think that social media is making us narcissistic. Divide the class into two sides (one for yes, the other for no) and have students reseat themselves based on their opinion. Then have students justify their opinion.

  • Watch The Offline Glass.

  • Ask, "Do you think this is a good idea? Do you think it would be successful? What are some other things establishments (like restaurants or cafes) or companies could do to encourage people to detach themselves from their phones more often?"

  • The Internet has made our options almost limitless. Instead of 34 channels on television, we can now browse thousands of titles on Netflix. Instead of going to a cookbook for recipes, we can now spend hours looking through Pinterest. Some say that more choice makes people less happy. Do you think that is true?
Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Comic
    Does Technology Make Us Narcissistic?

    Complete discussion on narcissism prior to activity.

    View Activity
  • Make a Comic
    Ideas to Motivate Disconnect

    Have students watch and discuss "The Offline Glass" before doing activity.

    View Activity
  • Make a Comic
    Life Before Cell Phones and the Internet

    View Activity
Step 3Concluding discussion with students
  • Having reflected on the societal effects of technology (addiction, narcissism, etc), does anyone have different views of technology and the phone they can’t be without?

  • Do these activities and discussions motivate you to disconnect from technology more? Why / Why not?
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Technology Overload 1 Does Technology Make Us Narcissistic?

Intro

In earlier discussions you defined narcissism and discussed the idea that today’s technology, especially social media, may be making people narcissistic. Think about that discussion for the following activity.

Instructions

Do you feel that today’s social media, and technology in general, is making us narcissistic?

Using examples, create a 3 panel Storyboard with images and explanations to justify your answer.

See rubric for guidelines.

Rubric: Does Technology Make Us Narcissistic?

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The opinion is highly developed; examples have significant purpose and engage the reader. The opinion is well developed; examples are specific and provide sufficient support. The opinion is briefly discussed; examples are accurate but not fully explained. The opinion is briefly discussed; vague or irrelevant examples. The opinion is not identified; lacks any supporting examples.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is clear with little variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• basic language; vague at times
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• vague, incorrect and repetitive language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Conventions The text demonstrates standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses eloquent words, rich sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses precise words, controlled sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates standard English conventions
• uses words and phrases, telling details and sensory language to convey a vivid picture
• demonstrates some accuracy in standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • contains multiple inaccuracies in Standard English conventions of usage and mechanics
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Technology Overload 2 Ideas to Motivate Disconnect

Intro

The short movie clip "The Offline Glass" showed how one bar encouraged people to put down their cell phones by creating a glass that needed to rest on top of a cell phone. Keep that clip and your class discussion in mind when doing the next activity.

Instructions

Think of at least three different ideas that establishments (restaurants / cafes / companies) can use to help encourage people to put down their phones, tablets, etc. and focus on each other. Create a 3-5 panel Storyboard with an image and explanation. You can depict strategies companies are already using or think of new ones.

See rubric for guidelines.

Rubric: Ideas to Motivate Disconnect

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The idea is highly developed; examples have significant purpose and engage the reader. The idea is well developed; examples are specific and provide sufficient support. The idea is briefly discussed; examples are accurate but not fully explained. The idea is briefly discussed; vague or irrelevant examples. The idea is not identified; lacks any supporting examples.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is clear with little variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• basic language; vague at times
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• vague, incorrect and repetitive language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Technology Overload 3 Life Before Cell Phones and the Internet

Intro

Parents love the phrase “When I was a kid…” to describe life before the convenient everyday items we have today. It wasn’t that long ago that cell phones were a luxury, and the Internet wasn’t something people had easy access to. You may want to talk to your parents to help generate some ideas for this activity.

Instructions

Using a 3-6 panel Storyboard, create images to show how life was different before cell phones and the Internet.

  • The more detailed the image, and explanation, the better.

See rubric for guidelines.

Rubric: Life Before Cell Phones and the Internet

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The image is focused, has thoughtful details and is insightful. The image is clear, well developed, and logical. The image is easy to follow; ideas are correct, but may be basic or simple. The image discusses some relevant ideas, but may have frequent errors. The image is hard to follow; ideas are not developed.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Conventions Complete sentences, spelling, punctuation, grammar (e.g.,
use of pronouns; agreement; verb tense
• correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures • few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning • occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning • several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow • repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
Total

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