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Lesson Plan by Lauren Martin M.Ed.

Suffragette Movement

Pixton Lesson Plan on Suffragette Movement

Make women's history month come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
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Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Character Map
  • Timeline
  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard
  • Graphic Novel

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings women's history month to life with comics and storyboards.
Pixton Lesson Plan on Suffragette Movement
Pixton Lesson Plan on Suffragette Movement

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Suffragette Movement

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  • Banner
    Banner
  • Building
    Building
  • Building
    Building
  • Envelope
    Envelope
  • Flag
    Flag
  • Prop Vintage Car
    Prop Vintage Car
  • Road
    Road
  • Skyline
    Skyline
  • Stage
    Stage
  • Table
    Table
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Teacher Guide

Suffragette Movement

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

Students can review the below activities, read teacher-provided texts, complete a research project, or discuss in class to learn about the Suffragette Movement. The opening discussion can be used as a starting point for reading and/or research activities.

Opening Discussion

Start a KW(H)L chart:

  • What do you already know about the Suffragette Movement?
  • What would you like to know about the Suffragette Movement?
  • How could you learn more about the Suffragette Movement?
Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Character Map
    Character Map

    Complete after class discussion, research or reading.

    View Activity
  • Make a Timeline
    Timeline

    Complete after class discussion, research or reading.

    View Activity
  • Make a Comic Strip
    Movie Summary

    Complete after viewing the film.

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Storyboard (Extension / Modification)

    Create a Storyboard to illustrate significant Suffragette's most famous quotes.

  • Extension / Modification
    Graphic Novel (Extension / Modification)

    Read or watch a nonfiction book or film about the Suffragette Movement and illustrate a Graphic Novel to summarize the main ideas.

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Discuss the following:

  • Complete the (L) column of the KW(H)L chart from the opening discussion to share what students have learned about the Suffragette Movement.
  • Why was the Suffragette Movement important?
  • How are the struggles and goals of the Suffragette Movement still relevant today?
  • Many people believe having just one month dedicated to women's history is problematic. Do you agree or disagree?
  • How can you better incorporate women's history into daily history throughout the year?
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Pixton Activity: Suffragette Movement 1 Character Map

Featured Layouts

  • Character Map

Intro

Have students read about, research or discuss historically significant suffragettes.

Instructions

Create a Character Map for at least three black leaders from history:

  • It's important to add as many details as you can to all the parts of the map.
  • Include an appropriate illustration based on the character's accomplishments.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Character Map

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The character map is fully developed with details that add significant meaning. The character map is complete; descriptions and details are thoughtful and accurate. The character map is complete; descriptions are basic, but accurate. The character map is incomplete; basic descriptions with little relevant details. The character map is incomplete; descriptions are short or inaccurate.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• significant details that make characters unique and dynamic
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• characters are similar; includes relevant details
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• characters similar to description
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• characters vaguey looks like description
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
• characters do not look like description
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is appropriate; lacks variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• simple language; vague and lacks purpose
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• inappropriate use of language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence • proper organization
• panels are thoughtful and detailed
• all panels are organized or logical
• all panels are present
• most panels are organized or logical
• all panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• some panels may be missing
• panels are not organized or logical
• panels are missing
Conventions Complete sentences, spelling, punctuation, grammar (e.g.,
use of pronouns; agreement; verb tense
• correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures • few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning • occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning • several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow • repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
Total
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Pixton Activity: Suffragette Movement 2 Timeline

Featured Layouts

  • Timeline

Intro

Have students read about, research or discuss historically significant events to the suffragette movement in Europe, America and globally.

Instructions

Create a Timeline to illustrate at least four significant events during the suffragette movement:

  • Identify the event date in the panel title.
  • Write a detailed description of the event.
  • Include an appropriate illustration for each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Example Timeline

Suffrage Movement Timeline by Student
18401840: Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton are barred from attending the World Anti-Slavery Convention held in London. This prompts them to hold a Women's Convention in the US.
18511851: Worcester, Massachusetts is the site of the second National Women's Rights Convention. Participants included Horace Mann, New York Tribune columnist Elizabeth Oaks Smith, and Reverend Harry Ward Beecher, one of the nation's most popular preachers. At a women's rights convention in Akron, Ohio, Sojourner Truth, a former slave, delivers her now memorable speech, "Ain't I a woman?"
18681868: Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Parker Pillsbury publish the first edition of The Revolution. This periodical carries the motto “Men, their rights and nothing more; women, their rights and nothing less!” Many early suffrage supporters, including Susan B. Anthony, remained single because in the mid-1800s, married women could not own property in their own rights and could not make legal contracts on their own behalf.
19121912: Woman Suffrage is supported for the first time at the national level by a major political party -- Theodore Roosevelt's Bull Moose Party. Twenty thousand suffrage supporters join a New York City suffrage parade. Oregon, Kansas, and Arizona adopt woman suffrage.
1920In 1919, the Senate finally passes the Nineteenth Amendment and the ratification process begins. On August 26, 1920, three quarters of the state legislatures ratify the Nineteenth Amendment. American Women win full voting rights. The amendment is worded exactly the same as the originally proposed amendment of 1878, forty-one years earlier.

Here's the link to share this comic:

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Pixton Activity: Suffragette Movement 3 Movie Summary

Featured Layouts

  • Comic Strip

Intro

Watch the film, Suffragette, before completing this activity.

Instructions

Create a Comic Strip to summarize four main scenes / events from the film:

  • Identify the key points that are important to the specific scene.
  • Include an appropriate illustration and dialogue.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Example Comic Strip

Suffragette Film by Student

Here's the link to share this comic:

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