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Lesson Plan by Christina Bouwens M.A.

Sonnet 73

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings Shakespeare to life with comics and storyboards.

Make Shakespeare come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
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Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard
  • Graphic Novel
  • Poster
  • Photo Story
  • Mind Map

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings Shakespeare to life with comics and storyboards.
Pixton Lesson Plan on Sonnet 73
Pixton Lesson Plan on Sonnet 73

Featured Props

Sonnet 73

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Casket
    Casket
  • Fire
    Fire
  • Leaf
    Leaf
  • Prop Grandfather Clock
    Prop Grandfather Clock
  • Road
    Road
  • Rubble
    Rubble
  • Snow
    Snow
  • Stars
    Stars
  • Sun
    Sun
  • Tree
    Tree
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Teacher Guide

Sonnet 73

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

Consider some background on The Bard prior to reading, analyzing and synthesising the poem with your students:

  1. Shakespeare Online Website - for Biographical info, FAQ, dates etc. located here
  2. Poetry Foundation Shakespeare page
  3. Absolute Shakespeare here
  4. Shakespeare's Biography here

Perhaps establish a Scavenger Hunt of sorts for your students with any/all of the above sites (adding any of your own choosing!) so that your students have an understanding, however slight, of Shakespeare's time period, writing style, and global impact.

Opening Discussion

Read the Shakespearean Sonnet #73 together ~ poem also located here:

That time of year thou may'st in me behold

When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang

Upon those boughs which shake against the cold,

Bare ruin'd choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.

In me thou see'st the twilight of such day,

As after sunset fadeth in the west,

Which by-and-by black night doth take away,

Death's second self, that seals up all in rest.

In me thou see'st the glowing of such fire

That on the ashes of his youth doth lie,

As the death-bed whereon it must expire

Consum'd with that which it was nourish'd by.

This thou perceivest, which makes thy love more strong,

To love that well which thou must leave ere long.

Discuss student reactions: what do you notice? What do you think this might be about? Do you like it -- why/not?

Analyze the poem's form: what do you notice about the structure? What stands out?

a.) Discuss the sonnet: a sonnet is a fourteen (14) line poem, comprised of 3 quatrains (which are 4-line stanzas) and a couplet (2 lines).

  • The entire 14 line poem is written in iambic pentameter, Shakespeare's signature writing method.
  • Shakespeare also implements the following rhyme scheme throughout: abab cdcd efef gg

b.) Iambic Pentameter: five (5) sets of an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable -- more detailed on this page

Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
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Pixton Activity: Sonnet 73 1 Imagery

Featured Layouts

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard
  • Graphic Novel

Intro

Imagery is the use of vivid language employing or involving the five (5) senses in creative description. It can involve any of all of the following senses:

  • touch
  • taste
  • smell
  • sound
  • vision
  1. Read the Mary Oliver poem "Black Snake" located here

  2. Discuss with a partner: what kinds of imagery stand out? Particular lines?

  3. Whole group share: where is an example of touch? Taste? Smell? Sound? Vision (sight)?

  4. How does the imagery contribute to or impact the overall poem? Does it make us more sad? Angry? Feel compassion or empathy?

Next, we'll do something similar with this Shakespearean sonnet!

Instructions

  1. Identify at least 3 examples of imagery throughout Shakespeare's Sonnet #73. Try your best to identify an example of each type (ie. touch, taste, smell, hearing, vision).

  2. Clearly identify the word(s) and the line(s) of the poem for each of your three (3) examples with proper citation.

  3. Create an image in your comic to best depict the scene &/or imagery established.

  4. Evaluate the overall impact on the poem which this imagery creates (eg. does it create drama/tension? humor? disgust? another feeling? How/Why?).

Rubric: Imagery

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview At least 5 clear examples of imagery are accurately identified and highly developed from the poem; relevant details/lines are selected to evaluate the impact of the use of imagery throughout the work. At least 4 clear examples of imagery are accurately identified and highly developed from the poem; relevant details/lines are selected to evaluate the impact of the use of imagery throughout the work. 3 examples of imagery are accurately identified and developed from the poem; relevant details/lines are selected to evaluate the impact of the use of imagery throughout the work. Fewer than 3 examples of imagery are identified and somewhat developed from the poem; relevant details/lines are selected to evaluate the impact of the use of imagery throughout the work. Fewer than 2 examples of imagery are identified yet not fully developed from the poem; relevant details or lines are not clearly selected nor evaluated for their impact on the work.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of appropriate textual detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is clear with little variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• basic language; vague at times
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• vague, incorrect and repetitive language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence (supporting examples identified) • proper organization
• text/details are properly referenced
• panels are thoughtful and detailed, fully illustrating each example of imagery
• all panels are organized or logical
• text/details are properly referenced
• all panels are present and detailed
• most panels are organized or logical
• text/details are properly referenced
• all necessary panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• text/details are not/improperly referenced
• minimal use of panels &/or some panels appear to be missing
• panels are disorganized or illogical (flow doesn't work)
• text/details are not referenced
• panels do not appear to fully illustrate imagery examples
Conventions The text demonstrates standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses eloquent words, rich sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses precise words, controlled sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates standard English conventions
• uses words and phrases, telling details and sensory language to convey a vivid picture
• demonstrates some accuracy in standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • contains multiple inaccuracies in Standard English conventions of usage and mechanics
Total

Student Handout

Share this comic with your students to demonstrate the activity without giving away the farm :)

Imagery in “Cinderella” by Pixton
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Pixton Activity: Sonnet 73 2 Theme

Featured Layouts

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard
  • Graphic Novel
  • Poster
  • Photo Story

Intro

Theme is the underlying meaning, message, or main idea of a work of literature.

Theme is more than simply identifying a topic or subject. Rather, a theme is a statement about the topic or subject. While a topic could be love, a theme on this topic might be "Love is blind," or "All's fair in love and war," and so forth.

Review the attached example for a preview of the expectations within this activity!

Instructions

Identify at least one major theme in the sonnet, creating two full panels to accomplish the following:

Panels must include~

  1. An image/scene depiction to illustrate the theme.
  2. A detailed statement about what the theme is, in your own words.
  3. Relevant details from the poem to "prove" or support your choice of theme (i.e. specific lines or words from Sonnet 73).
  4. Any additional detail you feel helps support your thematic analysis of the poem.

Rubric: Theme

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The theme is accurately identified and highly developed from the poem; relevant details/lines are selected to support this choice in thematic statement. The theme is accurately identified and sufficiently explained based on the poem; some details/lines are selected to support the choice in thematic statement. A theme is identified but either somewhat unclearly or somewhat undeveloped from the poem; details/lines from the poem do not seem to fully support the choice in thematic statement. A theme is somewhat unclearly identified and/or undeveloped from the poem; details/lines from the poem do not seem to fully support the choice in thematic statement. The theme isn't clearly or fully identified/developed upon from the poem; details/lines from the poem inadequate or missing to support the choice in thematic statement.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of appropriate textual detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is clear with little variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• basic language; vague at times
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• vague, incorrect and repetitive language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence (supporting examples identified) • proper organization
• text/details are properly referenced
• panels are thoughtful and detailed, fully illustrating each thematic statement
• all panels are organized or logical
• text/details are properly referenced
• all panels are present and detailed
• most panels are organized or logical
• text/details are properly referenced
• all necessary panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• text/details are not/improperly referenced
• minimal use of panels &/or some panels appear to be missing
• panels are disorganized or illogical (flow doesn't work)
• text/details are not referenced
• panels do not appear to fully illustrate themes
Conventions The text demonstrates standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses eloquent words, rich sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses precise words, controlled sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates standard English conventions
• uses words and phrases, telling details and sensory language to convey a vivid picture
• demonstrates some accuracy in standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • contains multiple inaccuracies in Standard English conventions of usage and mechanics
Total
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Pixton Activity: Sonnet 73 3 Mind Map

Featured Layouts

  • Mind Map

Intro

A Mind Map can be a terrific way to visualize what you see happening in a narrator's mind's eye -- in this way, you trace the "storyline" and focus in on the most important pieces of the poem's narrative.

Instructions

Create a Mind Map to identify and detail the following:

  • Panel 1: depicts the first four lines (lines 1 - 4)
  • Panel 2: depicts the second set of four lines (lines 5 - 8)
  • Panel 3: depicts the third set of four lines (lines 9 - 12)
  • Panel 4: depicts the final two lines (the couplet in lines 13 and 14)

At the center of this mind map stands the narrator, from whose mind each of these images, relevant words, and lines from the poem originate. In creating a Mind Map, you'll walk through how you envision the narrator's thoughts and images, textually based and imagined from there!

Review the attached comic for the Mary Oliver poem "The Black Snake" poem for an example.

Rubric: Mind Map

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview Identifies and highly develops images, concerns, or scenes from the speaker's mind in the sonnet; relevant details and lines provided to support the images depicted throughout. Identifies and develops images, concerns, or scenes from the speaker's mind in the sonnet; relevant details and lines provided to support the images depicted throughout. Identifies and somewhat develops images, concerns, or scenes from the speaker's mind in the sonnet; some relevant detail and lines provided to support the images depicted. Identifies and begins to develop images, concerns, or scenes from the speaker's mind in the sonnet; relevant details and/or lines are not sufficiently provided in support. Identifies and begins to develop images, concerns, or scenes from the speaker's mind, but lacks any detail or lines from the sonnet for any significant support.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of appropriate textual detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is clear with little variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• basic language; vague at times
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• vague, incorrect and repetitive language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence (supporting examples identified) • proper organization
• text/details are properly referenced
• panels are thoughtful and detailed, fully illustrating support for ideas/images
• all panels are organized or logical
• text/details are properly referenced
• all panels are present and detailed
• most panels are organized or logical
• text/details are properly referenced
• all necessary panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• text/details are not/improperly referenced
• minimal use of panels &/or some panels appear to be missing
• panels are disorganized or illogical (flow doesn't work)
• text/details are not referenced
• panels do not appear to fully illustrate ideas/images
Conventions The text demonstrates standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses eloquent words, rich sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses precise words, controlled sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates standard English conventions
• uses words and phrases, telling details and sensory language to convey a vivid picture
• demonstrates some accuracy in standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • contains multiple inaccuracies in Standard English conventions of usage and mechanics
Total

Example Mind Map

Shakespeare's Sonnet 73 Mind Map by Student
Mind MapSonnet 73 Mind Map Lines 1 - 4In the first few lines of this sonnet, the narrator details a late fall or autumn scene, complete with nearly naked tree branches "shak[ing] against the cold." The narrator identifies that some "sweet birds" sing, though "late" as "[b]are ruin'd choirs." This is a scene of melancholy, of a turning inward and toward winter. This is how he perceives himself, it seems: he is moving toward his life's twilight or past middle age, it would appear. Lines 5 - 8Lines 5 - 8 portray a narrator increasingly "giving up" in his own way, comparing himself as in "the twilight of such day, /
As after sunset fadeth in the west." This implies he feels he is much nearer the end of his life than the beginning of it. In fact, our narrator expresses that "black night" approaches and will soon close "up all in rest." Our poem is beginning to feel rather bleak, indeed!
Lines 9 - 12Next, our speaker shares that the "ashes of [my] youth" burnt in a fire long ago. He looks back at his youth as the thing that he was most "nourish'd by," which is now long gone. The sadness is palpable, as we wonder what will propel our narrator forward in his remaining years. Lines 13 - 14The final couplet provides the turn for us, in traditional Shakespearean sonnet form. We learn that the narrator has been speaking to his beloved, and that he recognizes and seems grateful to his love that this person "perceivest" the narrator's age, and loves him anyway. The narrator shares that all of this time, these years, seem to make "thy love more strong," all the while knowing he "must leave ere long." The mind map concludes with a sense of gratitude on the part of the narrator: he knows he will be loved the remainder of his life.

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