Over 16 million comics and storyboards created

Free!
Pixton Comic & Storyboard Maker

Lesson Plan by Lauren Martin M.Ed.

Sonia Sotomayor

Pixton Lesson Plan on Sonia Sotomayor

Make women's history month come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
Print All

Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Character Map
  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map
  • Timeline

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

Pixton Lesson Plan on Sonia Sotomayor
Pixton Lesson Plan on Sonia Sotomayor
Pixton Lesson Plan on Sonia Sotomayor

Featured Props

Sonia Sotomayor

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Block
    Block
  • Booth
    Booth
  • Certificate
    Certificate
  • Flag
    Flag
  • Gavel
    Gavel
  • Newspaper
    Newspaper
  • Paper
    Paper
  • Skyline
    Skyline
  • Stadium
    Stadium
  • Symbol
    Symbol
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

Sonia Sotomayor

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

Students can review the below activities, read teacher-provided texts, complete a research project, or discuss in class to learn about Sonia Sotomayor. The opening discussion can be used as a starting point for reading and/or research activities.

Opening Discussion

Start a KW(H)L chart:

  • What do you already know about Sonia Sotomayor?
  • What would you like to know about Sonia Sotomayor?
  • How could you learn more about Sonia Sotomayor?
Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Character Map
    Character Map

    Complete after class discussion, research or reading.

    View Activity
  • Make a Comic Strip
    Career

    Complete after class discussion, research or reading.

    View Activity
  • Make a Storyboard
    Court Cases

    Complete after class discussion, research or reading.

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Mind Map (Extension / Modification)

    Choose one of Sonia Sotomayor's Supreme Court rulings and illustrate the main events and concepts in a Mind Map.

  • Extension / Modification
    Timeline (Extension / Modification)

    Create a Timeline of Sonia Sotomayor's adult life and childhood.

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Discuss the following:

  • Complete the (L) column of the KW(H)L chart from the opening discussion to share what students have learned about Sonia Sotomayor.
  • Many people believe having just one month dedicated to latino history is problematic. Do you agree or disagree?
  • Many people believe having just one month dedicated to women's history is problematic. Do you agree or disagree?
  • How can you better incorporate black history and women's history into daily history throughout the year?
  • Why is it important to have a latino woman as a Supreme Court Judge?
  • Why is it important to have diversity within the Supreme Court?
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Sonia Sotomayor 1 Character Map

Featured Layouts

  • Character Map

Intro

Have students read about, research or discuss Sonia Sotomayor's character traits and accomplishments.

Instructions

Create a Character Map for Sonia Sotomayor:

  • It's important to add as many details as you can to all the parts of the map.
  • Include an appropriate illustration based on the character's accomplishments.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Character Map

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The character map is fully developed with details that add significant meaning. The character map is complete; descriptions and details are thoughtful and accurate. The character map is complete; descriptions are basic, but accurate. The character map is incomplete; basic descriptions with little relevant details. The character map is incomplete; descriptions are short or inaccurate.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• significant details that make characters unique and dynamic
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• characters are similar; includes relevant details
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• characters similar to description
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• characters vaguey looks like description
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
• characters do not look like description
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is appropriate; lacks variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• simple language; vague and lacks purpose
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• inappropriate use of language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence • proper organization
• panels are thoughtful and detailed
• all panels are organized or logical
• all panels are present
• most panels are organized or logical
• all panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• some panels may be missing
• panels are not organized or logical
• panels are missing
Conventions Complete sentences, spelling, punctuation, grammar (e.g.,
use of pronouns; agreement; verb tense
• correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures • few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning • occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning • several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow • repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Sonia Sotomayor 2 Career

Featured Layouts

  • Comic Strip

Intro

Have students read about, research or discuss the education, jobs and careers Sonia Sotomayor had leading up to becoming Supreme Court Justice.

Instructions

Create a Comic Strip to illustrate the education, jobs and careers Sonia Sotomayor had leading up to becoming Supreme Court Justice.

  • Include an appropriate thought or speech bubble for each panel.
  • Include appropriate illustrations for each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Example Comic Strip

Sonia Sotomayor Career Path by Student

Here's the link to share this comic:

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Sonia Sotomayor 3 Court Cases

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard

Intro

Have students read about, research or discuss Sonia Sotomayor's important Supreme Court cases and rulings.

Instructions

Create a Storyboard to illustrate Sonia Sotomayor's important court case rulings.

  • Include an appropriate title for each panel.
  • Write an appropriate description for each panel.
  • Include appropriate illustrations for each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Example Storyboard

Court Cases by Student
Silverman v. MLBSilverman v. Major League Baseball (1995): One of her most famous decisions was her ruling against Major League Baseball. Her ruling ended the baseball strike of 1994, after she struck down the owner's request for a new collective bargaining agreement. Dow Jones v. Dept. of JusticeDow Jones v. Department of Justice (1995): In this decision, the Wall Street Journal was attempting to obtain and publish of the last note left by former Deputy White House Counsel Vince Foster. Sotomayor ruled in favor of the Wall Street Journal, stating that the public had a substantial interest in the note. The ruling required the U.S. Justice Department to not act to stop its release. Pappas v. GiulianoPappas v. Giuliano (2002): In this appeal, Sotomayor dissented from the majority that ruled a New York Police officer could be fired for sending racist materials through the mail. Sotomayor's position was that the first amendment protected such speech, since the questionable activities, although hateful and offensive, were made outside of the police officer's employment. Berghuis v. ThompsonBerghuis v. Thompson (2010): This case was the first case in which Sotomayor wrote an opinion of the Supreme Court. This case involved the rights of individuals who are arrested by the police, given the proper Miranda warnings, understand their right to remain silent, yet speak anyway. The decision states that an individual does not invoke his or her right to silence by actually remaining silent and must affirmatively state they are relying on the right. While this was the majority opinion, Sotomayor wrote the dissenting opinion, stating that Miranda rules and protections have always required more in order to have a valid waiver of such rights. Many feel this decision was a major infringement on individual rights and the dissent has remained a popular opinion.

Here's the link to share this comic:

Find more lesson plans:

  • MADE AT PIXTON.COM