Over 16 million comics and storyboards created

Free!
Pixton Comic & Storyboard Maker

Lesson Plan by Lauren Martin M.Ed.

Shakespearean Play Genres

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings tragedy and comedy to life with comics and storyboards.

Make tragedy and comedy come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
Print All

Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map
  • Character Map
  • Graphic Novel

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

Pixton Lesson Plan on Shakespearean Play Genres
Pixton Lesson Plan on Shakespearean Play Genres
Pixton Lesson Plan on Shakespearean Play Genres

Featured Props

Shakespearean Play Genres

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Balcony
    Balcony
  • Book
    Book
  • Castle
    Castle
  • Chandelier
    Chandelier
  • Column
    Column
  • Feather
    Feather
  • Gravestone
    Gravestone
  • Stage
    Stage
  • Sword
    Sword
  • Throne
    Throne
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

Shakespearean Play Genres

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

While all of Shakespeare's plays are labeled as a Tragedy, Comedy or History, other plays can also be analyzed through the lens of these three categories. These categories can be thought of as archetypes that fit a specific mold and contain specific elements. Teaching the three Shakespearean genres help students read for a purpose when reading Shakespeare and other plays. If you are teaching a unit specifically on Shakespeare's body of work, consider sharing the following:

Shakespeare's 14 Comedies

  • All's Well That Ends Well
  • As You Like It
  • Comedy of Errors
  • Love's Labour's Lost
  • Measure for Measure
  • Merchant of Venice
  • Merry Wives of Windsor
  • Midsummer Night's Dream
  • Much Ado about Nothing
  • Taming of the Shrew
  • Tempest
  • Twelfth Night
  • Two Gentlemen of Verona
  • Winter's Tale

Shakespeare's 12 Tragedies

  • Antony and Cleopatra
  • Coriolanus
  • Cymbeline
  • Hamlet
  • Julius Caesar
  • King Lear
  • Macbeth
  • Othello
  • Romeo and Juliet
  • Timon of Athens
  • Titus Andronicus
  • Troilus and Cressida

Shakespeare's 11 Histories

  • Henry IV, Part I
  • Henry IV, Part II
  • Henry V
  • Henry VI, Part I
  • Henry VI, Part II
  • Henry VI, Part III
  • Henry VIII
  • King John
  • Pericles
  • Richard II
  • Richard III

Opening Discussion

Explain to students: Shakespeare wrote plays that fell into one of three categories: Tragedy, Comedy, and History. Reading plays through the lens of these categories leads to more effective analysis of the plot elements and themes.

Elements of a Tragedy

  • Serious themes and motifs
  • Death is important
  • Tragic hero with a fatal flaw that leads to downfall
  • Tense, suspenseful or ominous mood

Elements of a Comedy

  • Humorous language
  • Unexpected plot twists
  • Mistaken identities
  • Obstacles to love
  • Festive gatherings or celebrations

Elements of a History

  • Allusions to historical events (Current events during Shakespeare's lifetime)
  • Characters are British historical figures
  • Propaganda
  • Plot and character embellishment
Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Storyboard or Mind Map
    Shakespearean Play Genres

    Complete after opening discussion.

    View Activity
  • Make a Storyboard or Mind Map
    Examples of Shakespearean Play Genres

    Complete after class discussion or reading.

    View Activity
  • Make a Storyboard or Mind Map
    Illustrate Shakespearean Play Genres

    Complete after class discussion or reading.

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Character Map (Extension / Modification)

    Create three Character Maps to illustrate one hero from a comedy, a tragedy and a history.

  • Extension / Modification
    Graphic Novel (Extension / Modification)

    Create a Graphic Novel version of one of Shakespeare's comedies, tragedies or histories.

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Discuss the following:

  • What is an archetype?
  • In what ways are each of the Shakespearean play genres archetypes?
  • In what ways are the heroes in Shakespearean play genres archetypes?
  • What is the audience meant to learn from each type of Shakespearean play genre?
  • Based on the time period in which Shakespeare lived, why do you think his plays fell into these three genres? What social purpose did each serve?
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Shakespearean Play Genres 1 Shakespearean Play Genres

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map

Intro

Shakespeare wrote plays that fell into one of three categories: Tragedy, Comedy, and History. Reading plays through the lens of these categories leads to more effective analysis of the plot elements and themes.

Elements of a Tragedy

  • Serious themes and motifs
  • Death is important
  • Tragic hero with a fatal flaw that leads to downfall
  • Tense, suspenseful or ominous mood

Elements of a Comedy

  • Humorous language
  • Unexpected plot twists
  • Mistaken identities
  • Obstacles to love
  • Festive gatherings or celebrations

Elements of a History

  • Allusions to historical events (Current events during Shakespeare's lifetime)
  • Characters are British historical figures
  • Propaganda
  • Plot and character embellishment

Instructions

Create a Mind Map or Storyboard (three panels each) to illustrate the three types of shakespearean play genres:

  • Identify the genre in the panel title.
  • Write a detailed description of the genre.
  • Include an appropriate illustration for each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Shakespearean Play Genres 2 Examples of Shakespearean Play Genres

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map

Intro

Shakespeare wrote plays that fell into one of three categories: Tragedy, Comedy, and History. Reading plays through the lens of these categories leads to more effective analysis of the plot elements and themes.

Elements of a Tragedy

  • Serious themes and motifs
  • Death is important
  • Tragic hero with a fatal flaw that leads to downfall
  • Tense, suspenseful or ominous mood

Elements of a Comedy

  • Humorous language
  • Unexpected plot twists
  • Mistaken identities
  • Obstacles to love
  • Festive gatherings or celebrations

Elements of a History

  • Allusions to historical events (Current events during Shakespeare's lifetime)
  • Characters are British historical figures
  • Propaganda
  • Plot and character embellishment

Instructions

Create a Mind Map or Storyboard (three panels each) to illustrate examples of the three types of shakespearean play genres:

  • Identify the genre in the panel title.
  • Write a detailed description of the example of the genre.
  • Include an appropriate illustration for each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Shakespearean Play Genres 3 Illustrate Shakespearean Play Genres

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map

Intro

Shakespeare wrote plays that fell into one of three categories: Tragedy, Comedy, and History. Reading plays through the lens of these categories leads to more effective analysis of the plot elements and themes.

Elements of a Tragedy

  • Serious themes and motifs
  • Death is important
  • Tragic hero with a fatal flaw that leads to downfall
  • Tense, suspenseful or ominous mood

Elements of a Comedy

  • Humorous language
  • Unexpected plot twists
  • Mistaken identities
  • Obstacles to love
  • Festive gatherings or celebrations

Elements of a History

  • Allusions to historical events (Current events during Shakespeare's lifetime)
  • Characters are British historical figures
  • Propaganda
  • Plot and character embellishment

Instructions

Create three Mind Maps or Storyboards to illustrate three detailed examples of the three types of shakespearean play genres and the elements of each:

  • Identify the genre in the comic title.
  • Identify the genre element in the panel title.
  • Write detailed descriptions of the examples and genre element.
  • Include an appropriate illustration for each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Find more lesson plans:

  • MADE AT PIXTON.COM