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Lesson Plan by Lauren Martin M.Ed.

Sensory Language

Pixton Lesson Plan on Sensory Language

Make the five senses come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
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Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map
  • Character Map
  • Poster
  • Comic Strip

Featured Props

Sensory Language

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Ear
    Ear
  • Fire
    Fire
  • Hand
    Hand
  • Mic
    Mic
  • Moon
    Moon
  • Rain
    Rain
  • Smoke
    Smoke
  • Sun
    Sun
  • Teeth
    Teeth
  • Water
    Water
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Teacher Guide

Sensory Language

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

The ability to identify, visualize and write sensory language is an important critical thinking skill essential to reading comprehension. Teachers should explicitly teach students the definitions, components, and examples of sensory language (see attached example comics).

Opening Discussion

Create a KW(H)L chart:

  • What do you already know about sensory language?
  • What do you want to know about sensory language?
  • How could you learn more?
  • Why is the ability to identify, visualize and write sensory language important?
Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Storyboard
    Define

    Complete after opening discussion.

    View Activity
  • Make a Mind Map
    Apply

    Complete after class reading.

    View Activity
  • Make a Storyboard or Character Map
    Write Your Own

    Complete after class discussion.

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Poster (Extension / Modification)

    Create a classroom reference Poster to illustrate definitions and examples of sensory language.

  • Extension / Modification
    Character Map (Extension / Modification)

    Create a KW(H)L Character Map to illustrate what you know and want to know about sensory language.

  • Extension / Modification
    Comic Strip (Extension / Modification)

    Create a Comic Strip to illustrate sensory language in a work of poetry, prose or nonfiction.

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Add to your KW(H)L chart:

  • What did you learn about sensory language?
  • What are you still confused or unsure about?
  • What would you still like to know about sensory language?
  • How could you learn more?
  • How does this relate to other reading or writing activities or questions you have completed in the past?
  • What memory devices can you use or create to remember how to use this skill?
  • Why is it important to understand and use sensory language?
  • How can identifying, visualizing and writing sensory language help you become a stronger reader and writer?
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Pixton Activity: Sensory Language 1 Define

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard

Intro

Review the definition, elements, and examples of the five senses and sensory language.

Instructions

Create a Storyboard that illustrates the definition and elements of the five senses and sensory language:

  • Identify the element in the panel title.
  • Write a detailed description.
  • Include an appropriate illustration for each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

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Pixton Activity: Sensory Language 2 Apply

Featured Layouts

  • Mind Map

Intro

Review the definition, elements, and examples of the five senses and sensory language.

Instructions

Create a Mind Map that illustrates sensory language used in a fiction or nonfiction text:

  • Identify the sense in the panel title.
  • Write a detailed description.
  • Include an appropriate illustration for each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Apply

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The image is focused, has thoughtful details and is insightful. The image is clear, well developed, and logical. The image is easy to follow; ideas are correct, but may be basic or simple. The image discusses some relevant ideas, but may have frequent errors. The image is hard to follow; ideas are not developed.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Form Organization and sequence (beginning, middle, end) • proper organization
• sequence is highly effective and has purpose
• panels are thoughtful and detailed
• all panels are organized or logical
• logical sequence
• all panels are present
• most panels are organized or logical
• consistent attention to sequence
• all panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• some attention to sequence
• some panels may be missing
• panels are not organized or logical
• no attention to sequence
• panels are missing
Conventions Complete sentences, spelling, punctuation, grammar (e.g.,
use of pronouns; agreement; verb tense
• correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures • few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning • occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning • several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow • repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
Total
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Pixton Activity: Sensory Language 3 Write Your Own

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard
  • Character Map

Intro

Review the definition, elements and examples of the five senses and sensory language.

Instructions

Create a Storyboard or Character Map to illustrate your own use of sensory language:

  • Identify the sense in the panel title.
  • Write a detailed creative description.
  • Include an appropriate illustration for each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

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