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Lesson Plan by Lauren Martin M.Ed.

Romulus and Remus

Pixton Lesson Plan on Romulus and Remus

Make ancient history come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
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Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Storyboard
  • Comic Strip
  • Character Map
  • Poster
  • Graphic Novel
  • Mind Map

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings ancient history to life with comics and storyboards.
Pixton Lesson Plan on Romulus and Remus
Pixton Lesson Plan on Romulus and Remus

Main Characters

Romulus and Remus

When you import any of the activities below, you can choose to share these ready-made characters with your students.

  • Romulus from Romulus and Remus
    Romulus

    Legendary founder of Rome

  • Remus from Romulus and Remus
    Remus

    Brother of Romulus, who was killed.

Featured Props

Romulus and Remus

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Basket
    Basket
  • Cane
    Cane
  • Hill
    Hill
  • Hut
    Hut
  • River
    River
  • Sheep
    Sheep
  • Shield
    Shield
  • Spear
    Spear
  • Wall
    Wall
  • Wolf
    Wolf
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

Romulus and Remus

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

Share the legend of Romulus and Remus:

  • The legend of Romulus and Remus is a story of Ancient Roman Mythology to explain the founding of Rome. Romulus and Remus were twin brothers. When they were born, their parents put them in a basket on the River Tiber. The basket was swept ashore where Romulus and Remus were discovered by a she-wolf. The wolf nursed them until a shepherd and his wife discovered, rescued, and raised them. Romulus and Remus also became shepherds until a series of fights, captures, rescues, and killings inspired them to found their own city. They wanted to found a city near where the she-wolf had found them. However, Romulus wanted to found the city on the Palatine Hill while Remus wanted to found the city on the Aventine Hill. The brothers fought over where to build the city and fought more after an attempted prophecy where Romulus saw twelve birds and Remus saw only six, each arguing why their bird sighting prophesied their city. Romulus began building his city and his wall, while Remus relentlessly mocked him. To mock the weak wall, Remus jumped over Romulus' wall. Remus died after jumping over the wall. In one version of the legend, Remus died in the act of jumping over and falling from the height of the high wall. In a second version, one of Romulus' supporters killed Remus for mocking Romulus, and Romulus regretted and mourned his brother's death. The third and most common version Romulus killed Remus himself for his mockery. Either way, with Remus killed, Romulus became the sole founder of his city and namesake, Rome, which was said to be founded on April 21st, 753 BCE.
  • This is the legend, while the actual documented history of Rome is one of a city that formed out of seven hill settlements near the Tiber River. The Tiber provided these settlements with a water supply, while also being narrow enough to be bridged. However, the river separated the settlements from each other, making each individual settlement vulnerable to attack. They decided to drain the marshland and join together for strength and safety purposes. This took a very long time, unlike the seemingly rapid story of Romulus and Remus. Since the river settlements were in the Plains of Latium, they were known as the Latins. Since they were successful farmers and traders, Rome quickly became a rich and successful city.

Opening Discussion

Discuss the following:

  • What did you already know about Romulus and Remus?
  • What new information did you learn from the legend of Romulus and Remus?
  • Were you surprised by anything you learned about Romulus and Remus? Why or why not?
Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Storyboard
    KW(H)L Chart

    Complete after opening discussion.

    View Activity
  • Make a Comic Strip
    Summarize Romulus & Remus

    Complete after class reading.

    View Activity
  • Make a Character Map
    Character Map

    Complete after class discussion.

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Poster (Extension / Modification)

    Create a Poster to illustrate a map of Ancient Rome.

  • Extension / Modification
    Graphic Novel (Extension / Modification)

    Create a Graphic Novel to illustrate your own imaginative (fictional or modern adaptation) version of the story of Romulus and Remus and the rise of Ancient Rome.

  • Extension / Modification
    Mind Map (Extension / Modification)

    Create a Mind Map to compare and contrast the myth of Romulus and Remus and the actual history of Rome.

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Discuss the following:

  • What else would you like to know about Romulus and Remus?
  • How could you go about learning more about Romulus and Remus?
  • Does the legend of Romulus and Remus remind you of any other ancient myths or legends? Why or why not?
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Romulus and Remus 1 KW(H)L Chart

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard

Intro

Create a KW(H)L chart to show what you know and get curious and organized about learning more.

  • K: What you already KNOW about the subject.
  • W: What you WANT to learn.
  • H: HOW you can learn more.
  • L: What you LEARN.

Instructions

Create KW(H)L chart for Romulus and Remus using a four panel Storyboard:

  • Identify the letter in the panel title.
  • Write a detailed description for each panel.
  • Include an appropriate illustration for each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Romulus and Remus 2 Summarize Romulus & Remus

Featured Layouts

  • Comic Strip

Intro

The legend of Romulus and Remus is a story of Ancient Roman Mythology to explain the founding of Rome. Romulus and Remus were twin brothers. When they were born, their parents put them in a basket on the River Tiber. The basket was swept ashore where Romulus and Remus were discovered by a she-wolf. The wolf nursed them until a shepherd and his wife discovered, rescued, and raised them. Romulus and Remus also became shepherds until a series of fights, captures, rescues, and killings inspired them to found their own city. They wanted to found a city near where the she-wolf had found them. However, Romulus wanted to found the city on the Palatine Hill while Remus wanted to found the city on the Aventine Hill. The brothers fought over where to build the city and fought more after an attempted prophecy where Romulus saw twelve birds and Remus saw only six, each arguing why their bird sighting prophesied their city. Romulus began building his city and his wall, while Remus relentlessly mocked him. To mock the weak wall, Remus jumped over Romulus' wall. Remus died after jumping over the wall. In one version of the legend, Remus died in the act of jumping over and falling from the height of the high wall. In a second version, one of Romulus' supporters killed Remus for mocking Romulus, and Romulus regretted and mourned his brother's death. The third and most common version Romulus killed Remus himself for his mockery. Either way, with Remus killed, Romulus became the sole founder of his city and namesake, Rome, which was said to be founded on April 21st, 753 BCE.

Instructions

Create a Comic Strip to illustrate (in your opinion) the four most significant events in the legend of Romulus and Remus:

  • Include brief dialogue and/or an illustration for each event.
  • Identify the key points that are important to that specific event in the text.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Example Comic Strip

Summary of "Romulus and Remus" by Student

Here's the link to share this comic:

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Romulus and Remus 3 Character Map

Featured Layouts

  • Character Map

Intro

Share the legend of Romulus and Remus:

  • The legend of Romulus and Remus is a story of Ancient Roman Mythology to explain the founding of Rome. Romulus and Remus were twin brothers. When they were born, their parents put them in a basket on the River Tiber. The basket was swept ashore where Romulus and Remus were discovered by a she-wolf. The wolf nursed them until a shepherd and his wife discovered, rescued, and raised them. Romulus and Remus also became shepherds until a series of fights, captures, rescues, and killings inspired them to found their own city. They wanted to found a city near where the she-wolf had found them. However, Romulus wanted to found the city on the Palatine Hill while Remus wanted to found the city on the Aventine Hill. The brothers fought over where to build the city and fought more after an attempted prophecy where Romulus saw twelve birds and Remus saw only six, each arguing why their bird sighting prophesied their city. Romulus began building his city and his wall, while Remus relentlessly mocked him. To mock the weak wall, Remus jumped over Romulus' wall. Remus died after jumping over the wall. In one version of the legend, Remus died in the act of jumping over and falling from the height of the high wall. In a second version, one of Romulus' supporters killed Remus for mocking Romulus, and Romulus regretted and mourned his brother's death. The third and most common version Romulus killed Remus himself for his mockery. Either way, with Remus killed, Romulus became the sole founder of his city and namesake, Rome, which was said to be founded on April 21st, 753 BCE.
  • This is the legend, while the actual documented history of Rome is one of a city that formed out of seven hill settlements near the Tiber River. The Tiber provided these settlements with a water supply, while also being narrow enough to be bridged. However, the river separated the settlements from each other, making each individual settlement vulnerable to attack. They decided to drain the marshland and join together for strength and safety purposes. This took a very long time, unlike the seemingly rapid story of Romulus and Remus. Since the river settlements were in the Plains of Latium, they were known as the Latins. Since they were successful farmers and traders, Rome quickly became a rich and successful city.
  • Determining character traits is an important skill necessary to understanding the conflicts and themes of the plot. The characteristics that make up the main character and supporting characters help shape the outcome of the narrative.

Instructions

Create a Character Map to illustrate Romulus or Remus:

  • It's important to add as many details as you can to all the parts of the map.
  • Include an appropriate illustration based on the character traits outlined in the story.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Character Map

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The character map is fully developed with details that add significant meaning. The character map is complete; descriptions and details are thoughtful and accurate. The character map is complete; descriptions are basic, but accurate. The character map is incomplete; basic descriptions with little relevant details. The character map is incomplete; descriptions are short or inaccurate.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• significant details that make characters unique and dynamic
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• characters are similar; includes relevant details
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• characters similar to description
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• characters vaguey looks like description
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
• characters do not look like description
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is appropriate; lacks variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• simple language; vague and lacks purpose
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• inappropriate use of language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence • proper organization
• panels are thoughtful and detailed
• all panels are organized or logical
• all panels are present
• most panels are organized or logical
• all panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• some panels may be missing
• panels are not organized or logical
• panels are missing
Conventions Complete sentences, spelling, punctuation, grammar (e.g.,
use of pronouns; agreement; verb tense
• correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures • few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning • occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning • several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow • repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
Total

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