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Lesson Plan by Mitchell Zuvela B. Sc., B. Ed.

Revolution and Constitution

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings American history to life with comics and storyboards.

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This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings American history to life with comics and storyboards.
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings American history to life with comics and storyboards.
Pixton Lesson Plan on Revolution and Constitution

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Revolution and Constitution

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  • Flag
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Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

Revolution and Constitution

Step 1Class discussion with students

The Bill of Rights is a list of rights that are most important to the citizens of a country. It first originated in Britain when the government asserted their supremacy over the monarch. In the US, it is the collective name for the first 10 amendments of the US Constitution. The purpose of the amendments is to guarantee a number of personal freedoms for the public, and limit the power of the government. The Bill of Rights includes 10 amendments that were submitted for ratification in 1789, and were officially adopted in 1791. The Bill of Rights plays a major role in the decision making process of many government bodies and protects the public from unjust laws.

Review the first 10 amendments with your class. Provide your students with a small stack of sticky notes. Students will form groups of three or four to discuss the importance that each amendment has in society. Groups will come to a consensus for each amendment and rank them in their order of importance (first being most important). Create a table on the board with a column for each group to post their results. A member from each group will bring their sticky notes to the front, placing the amendments in the order they chose. Compare and contrast the rankings chosen by each group. What similarities or differences can be found? Why did each group make certain ranking decision?

  • First Amendment: Freedom of speech, press, religion, peaceable assembly, and to petition the government
  • Second Amendment: Right for the people to keep and bear arms, as well as to maintain a militia
  • Third Amendment: Protection from quartering of troops
  • Fourth Amendment: Protection from unreasonable search and seizure
  • Fifth Amendment: Due process, double jeopardy, self-incrimination, private property
  • Sixth Amendment: Trial by jury and other rights of the accused
  • Seventh Amendment: Civil trial by jury
  • Eighth Amendment: Prohibition of excessive bail, as well as cruel and unusual punishment
  • Ninth Amendment: Protection of rights not specifically enumerated in the Bill of Rights
  • Tenth Amendment: Powers of states and people
Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Comic
    How Laws are Made

    View Activity
  • Make a Comic
    American Revolution

    View Activity
  • Make a Comic
    Founders at the Constitutional Convention

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Explore (Extension / Modification)

    Explore historic examples of violations of the Bill of Rights.

  • Extension / Modification
    Discuss (Extension / Modification)

    Discuss the idea of whether a student has certain rights in school. Do all the amendments apply to children?

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

The Bill of Rights is a work in progress, with a number of new amendments being added occasionally. Look at the various other amendments and discuss their meaning and importance in society. Are there amendments that should be added?

Explore the second amendment and the varying interpretations of the wording in the quote "right to bear arms." This statement was made in the context of a militia having the right to protect themselves. The National Guard has taken on the role of the public militia, therefore, should a civilian have the right to own a gun? Discuss some of the recent tragedies involving gun violence and their impact on the second amendment.

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Pixton Activity: Revolution and Constitution 1 How Laws are Made

Instructions

Create a Timeline summarizing how a Bill is passed in the US government.

Each step should have:

  • A title
  • An appropriate illustration
  • A detailed summary

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: How Laws are Made

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Source are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total

Example Timeline

How Laws are Made by Student
Step 1: Bill is ProposedA law begins as an idea that has been proposed by either a representative or a citizen. A representative will write the bill, discuss it with other representatives to find a sponsor, and introduce it to the House.
Step 2: Bill is IntroducedA bill is introduced when it is placed in the hopper in the US house or Representatives. Only Representatives can introduce new Bills in the House. A Reading Clerk will assign the Bill a number, read it to the House, and assign it to a standing committee.
Step 3: Bill Goes to CommitteeEach committee is made up of a group of representatives who are experts on a certain topic such as agriculture, education, or international relations. The committee reviews, researches, and revises the Bill before they vote as to whether or not to send the Bill back to the House floor. If more information is needed, the committee will send the Bill to a subcommittee for further research.
Step 4: Bill is ReportedWhen a Bill has been approved by the committee, it is sent to the House floor where it will be debated by the US House of Representatives.
Step 5: Bill is DebatedRepresentatives will debate whether they agree or disagree with the Bill. A Reading Clerk will ask each section of the House whether any changes should be made to the Bill. When all the changes are made, the Bill is ready to be voted on.
Step 6: Vote on BillThe Bill is voted on by each Representative in the House. They can vote by voice, by standing, or electronic vote. If the Bill gets a majority vote, it is passed on to the US Senate by the Clerk of the House of Representatives.
Step 7: Bill Referred to SenateThe Senate goes through the same steps as the House of Representatives. If the Bill passes a vote by the Senate, it is sent to the President for approval.
Step 8: Bill Sent to PresidentWhen the Bill reaches the President, he / she can sign the Bill (pass), refuse (veto), or do nothing (pocket veto) which allows the Bill to pass if Congress is in session.

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Pixton Activity: Revolution and Constitution 2 American Revolution

Instructions

Design a T-Chart that compares and contrasts the political and economic factors that led to the American Revolution.

Each panel should include:

  • A title
  • An appropriate illustration
  • A detailed explanation

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: American Revolution

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Source are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total

Example Storyboard

American Revolution by Student
Economic Factor: French & Indian WarThe war between England and France left the British severely in debt. The British turned to the colonists for support through taxation, however, it was not well received. The colonists felt that their reliance on the British was minimal after the French threat had been subdued. Most colonists were against providing monetary support for the British government. Political Factor: Samuel AdamsSamuel Adams helped spread anti-British propaganda as the head of the Committees of Correspondence. Through his position as the head of Boston Town Meetings and clerk for the Massachusetts House of Representatives, he was able to draft petitions, resolutions, and letters of protest. He was also very important in the colonist led opposition to the Tea Act. Economic Factor: Stamp ActThe Stamp Act taxed a variety of different items such as playing cards, newspapers, printed documents, and marriage licenses. The British government passed the Act to pay for defenses used to protect the colonies. The Stamp Act was seen by colonists as a direct attempt to raise money for England. The colonies strongly opposed the Act, forcing its repeal by the British shortly thereafter. Political Factor: Tea ActThe Tea Act gave the East Indian Trading Company a monopoly over the tea trade in America. The Tea Act allowed the East Indian Trading Company to sell the massive tea surplus it held at a discount. The Act forced colonists to buy tea that would be taxed through the Townshend Act, undermining the American black market. A group of colonists who opposed the Tea Act made a demonstration of defiance by dumping a shipment of tea into the Boston Harbor. The event was known as the Boston Tea Party.

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Pixton Activity: Revolution and Constitution 3 Founders at the Constitutional Convention

Instructions

Complete a Mind Map discussing the roles and contributions made by each of the following founders of the Constitutional Convention:

  • Benjamin Franklin
  • Alexander Hamilton
  • James Madison
  • George Washington

Each panel should include:

  • An appropriate illustration of the founder, including a quote, and a detailed description.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Founders at the Constitutional Convention

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Source are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total

Example Mind Map

Founders at the Constitutional Convention by Student

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