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Lesson Plan by Lauren Martin M.Ed.

Punctuation

Pixton Lesson Plan on Punctuation

Make grammar come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
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Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map
  • Poster

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings grammar to life with comics and storyboards.
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings grammar to life with comics and storyboards.
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings grammar to life with comics and storyboards.

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Punctuation

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Arrow
    Arrow
  • Circle
    Circle
  • Cloud
    Cloud
  • Exclamation
    Exclamation
  • Lines
    Lines
  • Pencil
    Pencil
  • Prop Magnifying Glass
    Prop Magnifying Glass
  • Question
    Question
  • Tree
    Tree
  • Triangle
    Triangle
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

Punctuation

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

Based on your classroom needs and student learning abilities, share the regular and irregular punctuation rules for when to use periods, commas, semi-colons, and colons.

Opening Discussion

Discuss the following:

  • What is punctuation?
  • What is the purpose of punctuation?
  • What is the purpose of a period, and when is it used?
  • What is the purpose of a comma?
  • When should a comma be used?
  • When should a semi-colon be used?
  • When should a colon be used?
Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Comic Strip or Storyboard
    Comma Rules

    Complete after class discussion.

    View Activity
  • Make a Comic Strip or Storyboard
    Irregular Comma Rules

    Complete after class discussion.

    View Activity
  • Make a Comic Strip or Mind Map
    Semicolons & Colons

    Complete after class discussion.

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Poster (Extension / Modification)

    Create a classroom reference Poster to illustrate the rule of punctuation.

  • Extension / Modification
    Storyboard (Extension / Modification)

    Create a Storyboard to illustrate a mnemonic device to remember to rules of punctuation.

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Discuss the following:

  • In your opinion, what are the trickiest or most uncommon comma rules, and why?
  • In your opinion, what are the simplest and easiest to remember comma rules, and why?
  • How do you know when to start a new sentence and when to use a comma, conjunction, semicolon or colon?
  • What memory tools or mnemonic devices can you use to remember the irregular comma rules?
  • What memory tools or mnemonic devices can you use to remember the difference between colons and semi-colons?
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Punctuation 1 Comma Rules

Featured Layouts

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard

Intro

Basic Comma Rules:

  1. Use a comma before a conjunction (and, or, but, so) in a compound sentence.
  2. Use commas to separate items in a list.
  3. Use commas before and after "interrupter" words and phrases, that begin with "however" and "never the less."

Instructions

Create a Storyboard or Comic Strip to illustrate the three comma rules:

  • Include an appropriate title, description and/or dialogue for each panel.
  • Include an appropriate illustration for each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Example Comic Strip

Basic Comma Rules by Student

Here's the link to share this comic:

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Punctuation 2 Irregular Comma Rules

Featured Layouts

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard

Intro

Irregular Comma Rules:

  1. Use a comma after an introductory phrase at the beginning of a sentence.
    • After I took an early morning drive through the countryside, I stopped for breakfast.
  2. Use commas before and after non-essential elements of the sentence that provide information that is not essential to complete or understand the sentence.
    • Bob, the realtor, is hosting an open house on Saturday. 
  3. Use commas between two or more adjectives of equal importance (can be in any order) that describe a noun.
    • The muddy, slippery, messy soccer field was filled with puddles.
    • If the adjectives are of unequal importance and must stay in a specific order, they do not require a comma. For example, "big blue eyes" and "bright red hair" do not require commas because "blue big eyes" and "red bright hair" are grammatically incorrect and out of order.
  4. Use commas to separate dates and places.
    • The date was July 25, 2015.
    • He was born in Kansas City, Missouri.
  5. Use a comma before a direct quotation.
    • Paul replied, "I'm taking the earliest flight available."

Instructions

Create a Storyboard or Comic Strip to illustrate four or more irregular comma rules:

  • Include an appropriate title, description and/or dialogue for each panel.
  • Include an appropriate illustration for each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Example Comic Strip

Irregular Comma Rules by Student

Here's the link to share this comic:

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Punctuation 3 Semicolons & Colons

Featured Layouts

  • Comic Strip
  • Mind Map

Intro

Semicolon and Colon Rules:

  • A semicolon and colon have similar uses to a comma but they are stronger.
  • A semicolon and colon do not completely divide two sentences like a period.
  • A semicolon or colon is used to separate two sentences with closely related meanings, meaning the two sentences have to be next to each other in order to retain their meaning. If the sentence were alone, it would lose its meaning.
  • A semicolon can use two clauses or sentences with or without transition words (however, in addition, therefore).
  • A semicolon divides two sentences that must stay in that specific order in order to retain meaning.
    • All chocolate donuts are donuts; Not all donuts are chocolate donuts.
  • A colon divides two sentences that must be together to retain meaning, but they can flip-flop the order in which they occur and still retain that meaning.
    • The most important aspect of my personal life is family: The most important aspect of my career is my sense of fulfillment.
  • A colon is used to introduce a list when the list does not blend smoothly into the rest of a thought.
    • The following activities are popular in winter: Skiing; Snowboarding; Sledding; Skating.
  • When a list is introduced with a colon, semicolons are used to separate the items in the list.
  • Semicolons are used to separate a list of lengthy phrases.

Instructions

Create a Mind Map or Comic Strip to illustrate examples of when to use a semicolon vs. a colon:

  • Include an appropriate title, description and/or dialogue for each panel.
  • Include an appropriate illustration for each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Example Comic Strip

Semicolons vs. Colons by Student

Here's the link to share this comic:

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