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Lesson Plan by Mitchell Zuvela B. Sc., B. Ed.

North America

Pixton Lesson Plan on North America

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This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings world geography to life with comics and storyboards.
Pixton Lesson Plan on North America
Pixton Lesson Plan on North America

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North America

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Teacher Guide

North America

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

Brainstorm with your class how the United States represents a nation that is a mosaic of different beliefs and cultures. Break your students into groups, assigning them one of the following topics;

  • Language
  • Food
  • Religion
  • Clothing
  • Sports
  • Holidays

Ask each group to identify the key contributions that have been made to American culture, and which country the contribution came from. For example, Christmas is an Italian contribution and basketball is a Canadian contribution. Start a class discussion by recording your results on the board with a Table.

Opening Discussion

The United States is bordered by Canada to the North, and Mexico to the South. Both these nations are unique, with a complex history that spans several centuries. The history of both nations has had a significant influence on the United States. Divide your class into two teams that will represent Canada and Mexico. Each side will need to research the history, religions, languages, customs, and cultures that make their country unique. Using their research, the teams will engage in a debate to convince the teacher that their country has had the greater influence on America. Debate guidelines can be decided by the teacher or agreed upon by the class ahead of time.

Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Comic
    European Influence

    View Activity
  • Make a Comic
    Life in Canada

    View Activity
  • Make a Comic
    Life in Mexico

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Timeline (Extension / Modification)

    Complete an immigration Timeline for the United states from past to present.

  • Extension / Modification
    Poster (Extension / Modification)

    Create a Poster providing all the relevant information about a Canadian or Mexican holiday.

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Celebrate a Canadian or Mexican holiday in your classroom. (e.g. Cinco de Mayo, Boxing Day)

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Pixton Activity: North America 1 European Influence

Intro

European migration to the United States has shaped the country in many ways. During its expansion to the New World, European influence in the United States occurred in a number of ways. For example, many of the names used for streets, states, and cities came from colonial countries. (e.g. New England).

Instructions

Create a Storyboard that identifies 4-6 examples of influence that European countries have had on the United States in the following areas:

  • Geography
  • Architecture
  • Food
  • Language

Choose from the following countries:

  • England
  • Spain
  • Russia
  • Netherlands
  • France
  • Italy

Be sure to:

  • Identify the country in the title
  • Provide an accurate illustration
  • Describe the influence it has had on America

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: European Influence

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Source are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: North America 2 Life in Canada

Intro

The lives of people who live in Canada have many similarities to those who live in the United States, however, there are several key differences that make them unique. For example, would you put on a toque before you ate your poutine? Use the internet to research several unique characteristics of Canadian culture that would provide a snapshot of everyday life in Canada.

Instructions

Create 5-10 panel Comic Strip that illustrates life in Canada.

Make sure to illustrate relevant details about Canadian life including:

  • Language
  • Religion
  • Customs
  • Culture

It may be useful to plan your comic ahead of time. Think about the setting, characters, and theme.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Life in Canada

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Source are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total

Example Comic Strip

North America - Life in Canada by Student

Here's the link to share this comic:

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: North America 3 Life in Mexico

Intro

The life of people who live in Mexico have many similarities to those who live in the United States, however, there are several key differences that make them unique. For example, would you put on a sombrero before you ate an enchilada? Use the internet to research several unique characteristics of Mexican culture that would provide a snapshot of everyday life.

Instructions

Create a 5-10 panel Comic Strip that illustrates life in Mexico.

Make sure to illustrate relevant details about Mexican life such as:

  • Language
  • Religion
  • Customs
  • Culture

It may be useful to plan your comic ahead of time. Think about the setting, characters, and theme.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Life in Mexico

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Source are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total

Example Comic Strip

North America - Life in Mexico by Student

Here's the link to share this comic:

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