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Lesson Plan by Lauren Martin M.Ed.

Night by Elie Wiesel

Pixton Lesson Plan on Night by Elie Wiesel

Make the elements of a novel come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
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Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map
  • Plot Diagram
  • Character Map
  • Graphic Novel
  • Poster

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

Pixton Lesson Plan on Night by Elie Wiesel
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings the elements of a novel to life with comics and storyboards.
Pixton Lesson Plan on Night by Elie Wiesel

Main Characters

Night by Elie Wiesel

When you import any of the activities below, you can choose to share these ready-made characters with your students.

  • Eliezer from Night by Elie Wiesel
    Eliezer

    Fifteen-year-old narrator and autobiographical version of author

  • Shlomo from Night by Elie Wiesel
    Shlomo

    Eliezer’s father

  • Mrs. Wiesel from Night by Elie Wiesel
    Mrs. Wiesel

    Eliezer's mother

  • Hilda from Night by Elie Wiesel
    Hilda

    Eliezer’s oldest sister

  • Béa from Night by Elie Wiesel
    Béa

    Eliezer’s middle sister

  • Tzipora from Night by Elie Wiesel
    Tzipora

    Eliezer’s youngest sister

  • Moshe the Beadle from Night by Elie Wiesel
    Moshe the Beadle

    Eliezer’s teacher of Jewish mysticism

  • Akiba Drumer from Night by Elie Wiesel
    Akiba Drumer

    Jewish holocaust victim who loses faith

  • Madame Schächter from Night by Elie Wiesel
    Madame Schächter

    Madwoman/prophetess on Eliezer's cattle car

  • Juliek from Night by Elie Wiesel
    Juliek

    Young violinist in Auschwitz

  • Tibi and Yosi from Night by Elie Wiesel
    Tibi and Yosi

    Two brothers who plan to move to Palestine with Eliezer after the war

  • Dr. Josef Mengele from Night by Elie Wiesel
    Dr. Josef Mengele

    Notoriously cruel doctor who runs gas chambers and human experiments at Auschwitz

  • Idek from Night by Elie Wiesel
    Idek

    Eliezer’s cruel Kapo, a prisoner forced to police other prisoners

  • Franek from Night by Elie Wiesel
    Franek

    Eliezer’s foreman at Buna

  • Rabbi Eliahou from Night by Elie Wiesel
    Rabbi Eliahou

    Religious Jewish prisoner whose son abandons him

  • Zalman from Night by Elie Wiesel
    Zalman

    Eliezer’s fellow prisoner

  • Meir Katz from Night by Elie Wiesel
    Meir Katz

    Eliezer’s father’s friend from Buna who saves Eliezer’s life in cattle car

  • Stein from Night by Elie Wiesel
    Stein

    Eliezer’s relative from Antwerp, Belgium, whom they encounter Auschwitz

Featured Props

Night by Elie Wiesel

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Bomb
    Bomb
  • Fence
    Fence
  • Fire
    Fire
  • Plane
    Plane
  • Shovel
    Shovel
  • Snow
    Snow
  • Stage
    Stage
  • Tank
    Tank
  • Tracks
    Tracks
  • Train
    Train
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

Night by Elie Wiesel

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

Students should understand that Night is largely autobiographical. The author, Elie Wiesel, was born on September 30, 1928, into a Jewish family in Sighet, Transylvania, which became part of Hungary in 1940. Germany occupied Hungary in March of 1944 and eventually murdered 560,000 Hungarian Jews. In Wiesel’s hometown, of 15,000 Jews, only fifty families survived. In May of 1944, when Wiesel was fifteen, his family and the other Jews in Sighet were round up and sent to the Auschwitz concentration camp in Poland. Over the course of the holocaust, Auschwitz was the deadliest concentration camp, killing 1,300,000 Jews. While Wiesel survived, his father, mother, and little sister all died.

Wiesel took a ten-year vow of silence concerning the Holocaust, until 1956, when he published an 800-page account of his experience. His original work was in Yiddish, and the title translated to: "And the World Remained Silent". This work became the novel, Night.

Opening Discussion

Discuss the following

  • What do you know about the holocaust?
  • What do you already know about concentration camps, including Auschwitz?
  • Review the following themes and make a prediction about the content of the book:
    • Religious faith is shaken during times of suffering
    • The innocent are not rescued from sacrifice
    • Human capacity for selfishness and cruelty
    • The importance of father-son loyalty
Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Storyboard or Mind Map
    Major Themes

    Complete at the end of the novel.

    View Activity
  • Make a Plot Diagram
    Conflict and Plot

    Complete at the end of the novel.

    View Activity
  • Make a Character Map
    Character Map

    Begin at the start of the novel, and make additions throughout the unit.

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Graphic Novel (Extension / Modification)

    Create a short Graphic Novel to summarize the book.

  • Extension / Modification
    Poster (Extension / Modification)

    Complete a research project on the holocaust and showcase photographs and facts on a large Poster.

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Discuss the following:

  • What have you learned from reading Night?
  • What would you like to know more about after reading Night?
  • How has your perspective on or understanding of the holocaust changed after reading Night?
  • Wiesel titled his original work, "And the World Remained Silent." The original version is said to contain more expressions of anger and vengeance towards the Nazis. What is significant about the original title? What theme or purpose does the title enhance?
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Pixton Activity: Night 1 Major Themes

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map

Intro

Review the four major themes of the book:

  • Religious faith is shaken during times of suffering
  • The innocent are not rescued from sacrifice
  • Human capacity for selfishness and cruelty
  • The importance of father-son loyalty

Instructions

For each major theme, identify at least two examples in the novel and depict them in a Mind Map or Storyboard:

  • Identify the theme in the Mind Map title
  • Briefly describe the scene in the panel title
  • Create an image that summarizes the scene
  • Include a quote or specific example that fits the theme

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Major Themes

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The theme is highly developed; examples have significant purpose and are highly detailed. The theme is well developed; examples are specific and provide ample support. The theme is briefly discussed; examples are accurate but not fully explained. The theme is poorly discussed; vague or irrelevant examples. The theme is not identified; lacks any supporting examples.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is clear with little variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• basic language; vague at times
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• vague, incorrect and repetitive language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence • proper organization
• examples are properly referenced
• panels are thoughtful and detailed
• all panels are organized or logical
• examples are properly referenced
• all panels are present
• most panels are organized or logical
• examples are properly referenced
• all panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• examples are not/improperly referenced
• some panels may be missing
• panels are not organized or logical
• examples are not referenced
• panels are missing
Conventions The text demonstrates standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses eloquent words, rich sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses precise words, controlled sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates standard English conventions
• uses words and phrases, telling details and sensory language to convey a vivid picture
• demonstrates some accuracy in standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • contains multiple inaccuracies in Standard English conventions of usage and mechanics
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Night 2 Conflict and Plot

Featured Layouts

  • Plot Diagram

Intro

Track major plot points while reading in order to complete the plot mountain at the end of the novel.

Instructions

Summarize Night using a Plot Diagram:

  • Include a brief description and an illustration of each point on the plot diagram (introduction, rising action, climax, falling action, conclusion).
  • Identify the key points that are important to that specific point in the story.
  • Think about quotes that could be used to help create meaning in each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Conflict and Plot

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The plot diagram is focused, with advanced use of language/ideas. The plot diagram is accurate, well developed, with consistent use of details. The plot diagram is complete and accurate; lacks consistent use of specific details. The plot diagram is basic; has several errors,or lacks detail. The plot diagram is inaccurate and difficult to follow.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• summary is clear and highly detailed
• descriptions are thoughtful and highly developed
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• summary is clear and accurate
• logical descriptions that clarify and develop the idea
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• summary is short, but accurate
• descriptions are simple and consistent
• some relevant ideas
• summary has several errors
• descriptions are brief and lack detail
• often very brief
• summary is has significant errors
• descriptions are difficult to follow
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • varies language to develop meaning
• varies sentence structure for effect
• images and characters have impact on the meaning of the panel
• language is clear with some variety
• varies sentence structure
• makes attempts to use descriptive language
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is clear with little variety
• basic sentence structure with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• basic language; vague at times
• some variety in sentence length and type
• images and characters have minimal development
• vague, incorrect and repetitive language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence (beginning, middle, end) • proper organization
• sequence is highly effective and has purpose
• all panels are thoughtful and detailed
• all panels are organized or logical
• logical sequence
• all panels are present
• most panels are organized or logical
• consistent attention to sequence
• all panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• some attention to sequence
• some panels may be missing
• panels are not organized or logical
• no attention to sequence
• panels are missing
Conventions The text demonstrates standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses eloquent words, rich sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses precise words, controlled sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates standard English conventions
• uses words and phrases, telling details and sensory language to convey a vivid picture
• demonstrates some accuracy in standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • contains multiple inaccuracies in Standard English conventions of usage and mechanics
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Night 3 Character Map

Featured Layouts

  • Character Map

Intro

Determining character traits is an important skill necessary to understanding the conflicts and themes of the plot. The characteristics that make up the main character and supporting characters help shape the outcome of the narrative.

Instructions

Choose three of your favorite characters from Night and create a Character Map for each one.

  • It's important to add as many details as you can to all the parts of the map.
  • Include an appropriate illustration based on the character traits outlined in the novel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

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