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Lesson Plan by Lauren Martin M.Ed.

KW(H)L Chart

Pixton Lesson Plan on KW(H)L Chart

Make graphic organizers come to life with comics!

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Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map
  • Character Map
  • Poster

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

Pixton Lesson Plan on KW(H)L Chart
Pixton Lesson Plan on KW(H)L Chart
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings graphic organizers to life with comics and storyboards.

Featured Props

KW(H)L Chart

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Backpack
    Backpack
  • Blackboard
    Blackboard
  • Book
    Book
  • Bookcase
    Bookcase
  • Brain
    Brain
  • Building
    Building
  • Computer
    Computer
  • Notepad
    Notepad
  • Pen
    Pen
  • Prop School Bus
    Prop School Bus
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

KW(H)L Chart

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

KW(H)L charts are an excellent (and easy) way to help students organize and articulate exactly what they know and want to know about a text, topic or unit before reading or researching, and what they learn afterwards. Identifying how students will learn new information is a great way to build resourcefulness. For research, KW(H)L charts serve as an action plan to start research and an outline to begin writing. KW(H)L charts are also an effective tool to help English Language Learners (ESL/ELLs) keep up with new material and track progress.

Opening Discussion

We use KW(H)L charts before, during, and after reading, learning or researching about a new topic. We also use KW(H)L charts before a new unit. This way, we can see what we already know (and don't have to review) and what we still have left to learn. After the project or reading is complete, we can keep a record of exactly how much we learned for later review.

  • K: What you already KNOW about the subject.
  • W: What you WANT to learn.
  • H: HOW you can learn more.
  • L: What you LEARN.
Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Storyboard
    Create a KW(H)L Chart

    Complete after opening discussion.

    View Activity
  • Make a Mind Map
    KW(H)L Chart for a Topic

    Complete during class discussion.

    View Activity
  • Make a Character Map
    KW(H)L Chart for a Person

    Complete during or after class reading or discussion.

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Poster (Extension / Modification)

    Create a classroom reference Poster to illustrate how to create and use a KW(H)L chart.

  • Extension / Modification
    Character Map (Extension / Modification)

    Create a KW(H)L Character Map to illustrate what you know and want to know about a family member or friend.

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Discuss the following:

  • How do KW(H)L charts help you more effectively conduct research and write a research paper?
  • How do KW(H)L charts help you more effectively absorb and retain information from a new text or unit?
  • How can you KW(H)L charts help you succeed on cumulative (end of term) exams?
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: KW(H)L Chart 1 Create a KW(H)L Chart

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard

Intro

We use KW(H)L charts before, during, and after reading, learning or researching about a new topic. We also use KW(H)L charts before a new unit. This way, we can see what we already know (and don't have to review) and what we still have left to learn. After the project or reading is complete, we can keep a record of exactly how much we learned for later review.

  • K: What you already KNOW about the subject.
  • W: What you WANT to learn.
  • H: HOW you can learn more.
  • L: What you LEARN.

Instructions

Create a four panel Storyboard that summarizes the KW(H)L chart:

  • Identify the letter in the panel title.
  • Write a detailed description of the letter's meaning.
  • Include an appropriate illustration for each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: KW(H)L Chart 2 KW(H)L Chart for a Topic

Featured Layouts

  • Mind Map

Intro

Before a new unit, topic, text or research project, create a KW(H)L chart to show what you know and get curious and organized about learning more.

  • K: What you already KNOW about the subject.
  • W: What you WANT to learn.
  • H: HOW you can learn more.
  • L: What you LEARN.

Instructions

Create KW(H)L chart for a specific topic using a four panel Mind Map:

  • Identify the letter in the panel title.
  • Write a detailed description for each panel.
  • Include an appropriate illustration for each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: KW(H)L Chart 3 KW(H)L Chart for a Person

Featured Layouts

  • Character Map

Intro

Before learning about a historical figure or fictional character from a book, create a KW(H)L chart to show what you know and get curious and organized about learning more. Add to your chart as you read and/or learn new information.

  • K: What you already KNOW about the subject.
  • W: What you WANT to learn.
  • H: HOW you can learn more.
  • L: What you LEARN.

Instructions

Create KW(H)L chart for a specific topic using a Character Map.

  • Identify the letter in the panel title.
  • Write a detailed description for each panel.
  • Include an appropriate illustration for each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: KW(H)L Chart for a Person

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The character map is fully developed with details that add significant meaning. The character map is complete; descriptions and details are thoughtful and accurate. The character map is complete; descriptions are basic, but accurate. The character map is incomplete; basic descriptions with little relevant details. The character map is incomplete; descriptions are short or inaccurate.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• significant details that make characters unique and dynamic
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• characters are similar; includes relevant details
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• characters similar to description
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• characters vaguey looks like description
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
• characters do not look like description
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is appropriate; lacks variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• simple language; vague and lacks purpose
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• inappropriate use of language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence • proper organization
• panels are thoughtful and detailed
• all panels are organized or logical
• all panels are present
• most panels are organized or logical
• all panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• some panels may be missing
• panels are not organized or logical
• panels are missing
Conventions Complete sentences, spelling, punctuation, grammar (e.g.,
use of pronouns; agreement; verb tense
• correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures • few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning • occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning • several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow • repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
Total

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