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Lesson Plan by Maggie M. Larche M.A.

Investment for Elementary School

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings economic concepts to life with comics and storyboards.

Make economic concepts come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
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Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map
  • Timeline
  • Poster

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings economic concepts to life with comics and storyboards.
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings economic concepts to life with comics and storyboards.
Pixton Lesson Plan on Investment for Elementary School

Featured Props

Investment for Elementary School

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Bicycle
    Bicycle
  • Bookcase
    Bookcase
  • Calendar
    Calendar
  • Chair
    Chair
  • Clock
    Clock
  • Money
    Money
  • Monitor
    Monitor
  • Prop School Bus
    Prop School Bus
  • School
    School
  • Spanner
    Spanner
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

Investment for Elementary School

Ask your students if they've ever heard of the term investment. Ask them to tell you in their own words what investment is. Ask them what kinds of things you can invest in and why you would even want to.

After brainstorming as a class, define the term for them:

  • To invest is to give up time, money, or effort now for some future benefit.

Businesses, individuals, and governments all invest. Tell your students that they will explore all the different kinds of investment through the activities.

Step 1Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Storyboard
    Do Schools Invest?

    It might be fun to take a quick walk around the school as a class before students complete their assignments. As you walk, tell students to be on the lookout for any areas that could use some investment.

    View Activity
  • Make a Timeline, Storyboard, or ...
    Invest in Yourself

    Brainstorm various ideas with students before they begin their comics.

    View Activity
  • Make a Poster
    Investing Money

    After completing this assignment, have students interview their parents about how their money is invested.

    View Activity
Step 2Concluding discussion with students

Remind your students that investment is very important because it allows us to build a better world in the future by giving up something today. Without it, we'd be stuck without any progress, but, with it, we can do anything.

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Investment for Elementary School 1 Do Schools Invest?

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard

Intro

Like you discussed with your teacher, investment is giving up something now in order to get even better benefits in the future. Businesses have to invest all the time. One might invest in better equipment, for instance. This would take up some of its current funds, but it would give greater benefits in the future when the new equipment helps the business.

Instructions

Schools invest just like businesses do.

Come up with three ways that your school might invest in itself. It could be in new resources or new facilities. Perhaps even something fun like a new playground. Be creative. The only catch is that it has to be something that the school could do now that would bring benefits in the future.

In the description for each panel, explain how it would be an investment. What future benefits would it bring?

Rubric: Do Schools Invest?

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Sources are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Investment for Elementary School 2 Invest in Yourself

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map
  • Timeline

Intro

Did you know that investing in something doesn't always have to mean buying stuff? You can also invest in people. In fact, one of the best ways to ensure a bright future for yourself is to invest in yourself now.

Instructions

Show four ways you could invest in yourself to help yourself in the future. What could you do now or over the next couple of years that would pay off in future years? In the description, explain how each example is an investment.

Rubric: Invest in Yourself

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Sources are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Investment for Elementary School 3 Investing Money

Featured Layouts

  • Poster

Intro

A common way you hear about investing is when someone invests money. Just like with the more general definition, to invest money is to give it up now in order to get some future benefit. If it's worthwhile to invest money, then you'd expect to make more in the future than you're giving up now.

Investing money is a good way to save it for a future purchase. Since you don't need it right away, you can invest the money and watch it grow. Then, when you need it for something, you can withdraw the money and hopefully have more than you started with.

Many people invest money in a bank or similar financial institution. The bank "borrows" your money and pays you back in interest. That's money that you make just by having money!

Instructions

Create a poster showing a big purchase that you'd like to make someday. This is your savings goal.

As you create your poster, remember that you can save for the purchase by investing your money now.

Example Poster

My Savings Goal by Student

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