Over 16 million comics and storyboards created

Free!
Pixton Comic & Storyboard Maker

Lesson Plan by Mitchell Zuvela B. Sc., B. Ed.

Industrial Revolution in Europe

Pixton Lesson Plan on Industrial Revolution in Europe

Make European history come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
Print All

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

Pixton Lesson Plan on Industrial Revolution in Europe
Pixton Lesson Plan on Industrial Revolution in Europe
Pixton Lesson Plan on Industrial Revolution in Europe

Featured Props

Industrial Revolution in Europe

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Bridge
    Bridge
  • Fire
    Fire
  • Hammer
    Hammer
  • Lantern
    Lantern
  • Pickaxe
    Pickaxe
  • Skyline
    Skyline
  • Smoke
    Smoke
  • Steam
    Steam
  • Train
    Train
  • Wheel
    Wheel
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

Industrial Revolution in Europe

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

The greatest impact of the Industrial Revolution was that the standard of living began seeing a consistent increase for the first time in history. During the revolution, there was a major migration of rural workers to the cities in search of work. Once they arrived, workers had little choice but to live with the long days, poor pay, and major health risks. At the start of the revolution, factory workers had very few rights in the workplace. Many workers lost their jobs or were jailed for speaking out against how they were being treated. As time passed, reforms were made that improved the standard of living and restricted child labor. This paved the way for a rise of the middle class which allowed for workers to purchase new goods which would further drive the economy.

Opening Discussion

How much do your students know about the Industrial Revolution? Ask the to answer the following true or false questions:

  • Women made 30% less than men (True)
  • Workers' jaw bones would erode giving them a condition called 'phossy jaw' (True)
  • It was illegal to marry a person who worked at your factory (False: legal)
  • Children as young as three were found working in factories (False: five)
  • The best way to flush a toilet was by throwing the waste out the window (True)
  • A Luddite is someone who hates the British (False: technology)
  • Up to 50% of children would die before age five (True)
  • Britain was commonly referred to as 'the workshop of the world' (True)
  • Because the living conditions were unsanitary, outbreaks of Malaria commonly occurred (False: Cholera)
Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Comic
    Causes of the Industrial Revolution

    View Activity
  • Make a Comic
    Inventors of the Industrial Revolution

    View Activity
  • Make a Comic
    Unification of Italy and Germany

    View Activity
  • Make a Comic
    Life in a Factory

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Write (Extension / Modification)

    Write a short paper discussing why a new industrial revolution is currently occurring in China.

  • Extension / Modification
    Poster (Extension / Modification)

    Create a Poster advertising work at a factory during the Industrial Revolution.

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Have your students become the owners of their own factory during the Industrial Revolution. They will be in full control of all the major planning and running of factory operations. Students will design a floor plan of their factory, an outline of the location of all important equipment, the number of workers that will be needed, and how their machinery will be powered. Proper bookkeeping will also be required to manage the pay of their workers, expenses associated with the materials, and cost of buying new machinery. Workers' accommodations will also need to be addressed. It is important that factory workers understand the rules and regulations of your factory. A list of rules should be constructed to address issues concerning child labor, working hours, break times, fraternizing, and penalties for questioning labor conditions.

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Industrial Revolution in Europe 1 Causes of the Industrial Revolution

Instructions

Create a Mind Map identifying at least four causes of the Industrial Revolution.

Each panel should include:

  • A title
  • An appropriate graphic
  • A detailed description of the cause

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Causes of the Industrial Revolution

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Source are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Industrial Revolution in Europe 2 Inventors of the Industrial Revolution

Intro

During the Industrial Revolution, a wave of creativity inspired numerous inventors to find ways to produce goods quicker and cheaper. Factories were built around England and Europe to increase the production of goods. There were many benefits of the Industrial Revolution, however, the migration or rural workers to the city brought problems of its own. It is an important period in time because it paved the way for the consumer economy we see today.

Instructions

Complete a Mind Map discussing four major inventors, their inventions, and their impact on society.

  • Each panel should include an appropriate graphic that appropriately depicts their invention, and a detailed description of its impact.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Inventors of the Industrial Revolution

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Source are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Industrial Revolution in Europe 3 Unification of Italy and Germany

Intro

Italy and Germany were made up of numerous city-states that were run autonomously by different monarchs. After several wars during the 18th and 19th centuries, the countries found a need to consolidate their city-states so that resources could be pooled and armies consolidated. The unification of so many different areas was not an easy task, however, both countries became more powerful as a result.

Instructions

Using a T-Chart, summarize the cause, course, and consequences of the unification of Italy, and Germany.

  • Each panel should include an appropriate graphic and a detailed summary.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Unification of Italy and Germany

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Source are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total

Example Storyboard

Unification of Italy and Germany by Student
German Unification: CauseOccurred on January 18, 1871, at the Palace of Versailles in the Hall of Mirrors, France. After the French capitulation in the Franco-Prussian War, Princes of the German states gathered there to proclaim Wilhelm I of Prussia as German Emperor. German Unification: CourseBismarck made his speech in 1862 about the idea of a German nation-state in the peaceful spirit of Pan-Germanism. The need for both iron and blood were two areas of focus for Bismark. The Schleswig-Holstein Question brought Austrians and Germans together to fight the Danes. The support of the Germans in the Austro-Prussian War also solidified interests for a unified Germany. German Unification: ConsequencesThe German unification led to a strong nation that would prove a tough adversary against any future aggressors such as France or Prussia. Unifying all areas of Germany took several years and a few forceful takeovers. Italian Unification: CauseThe unification of Italy was a cultural and political entity that was known as the Risorgimento. An aristocratic politician named Camillo di Cavour, finally unified Italy under the crown of Sardinia using the tools of realpolitik. In 1861, Italy was declared a united nation-state under the Sardinian king Victor Immanuel II. Italian Unification: CourseThe Italians fought in several wars to seek independence from Austria. The Sardinians, who sided with French and British forces, defeated the Austrians. The liberation of the Sardinians paved the way for other territories to join Italy such as Naples. Italian Unification: ConsequencesThe polarity of economic success in Northern and Southern Italy led to the "Southern Question." Italy continued to have feelings of distrust against Germany and would eventually join the Triple Entente during WWI to gain back lost territories.

Here's the link to share this comic:

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Industrial Revolution in Europe 4 Life in a Factory

Instructions

Create a Comic Strip following the life of a child working in a factory during the Industrial Revolution.

Make sure to illustrate the following:

  • Working conditions
  • Hours
  • Hazards
  • Living conditions of factory workers during this time.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Life in a Factory

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Source are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total

Example Comic Strip

Industrial Revolution: Life in a Factory by Student

Here's the link to share this comic:

Find more lesson plans:

  • MADE AT PIXTON.COM