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Lesson Plan by Maggie M. Larche M.A.

Incentives

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings economic concepts to life with comics and storyboards.

Make economic concepts come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
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Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Mind Map
  • Poster
  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard
  • Graphic Novel
  • Timeline

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

Pixton Lesson Plan on Incentives
Pixton Lesson Plan on Incentives
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings economic concepts to life with comics and storyboards.

Featured Props

Incentives

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Arrow
    Arrow
  • Ball
    Ball
  • Carrot
    Carrot
  • Money
    Money
  • Present
    Present
  • Prop Dollar Sign
    Prop Dollar Sign
  • Rake
    Rake
  • Teddy
    Teddy
  • Ticket
    Ticket
  • Trophy
    Trophy
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

Incentives

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

Ask students why they came to school today. Write their answers on the board. Reasons could be to learn, to make good grades, because Mom or Dad made them, to get into college one day.

Once you have a list of ideas, explain to students that these are all incentives for them to come to school.

Opening Discussion

Tell students that an incentive is anything that motivates us to do something. It's the "why" behind our actions. Though we may not realize it, incentives are very powerful drivers of behavior.

Disincentives are just the opposite. They are factors that convince us not to do something, and they are also very powerful.

Tell students that once they get in the habit, they'll see incentives everywhere influencing their behavior in one way or another.

Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Mind Map
    Incentives Map

    Once students complete their individual comics, you may wish to combine their ideas into a class incentives map.

    View Activity
  • Make a Poster
    Businesses and Incentives

    View Activity
  • Make a Timeline, Graphic Novel, or ...
    To Make a Friend

    View Activity
  • Make a Storyboard
    What Career to Choose

    View Activity
Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Tell students that one of the most basic rules of economics is that "incentives matter." This is because incentives are at the heart of all of our decision-making. As students understand incentives, they'll be better able to understand why they and others do what they do.

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Incentives 1 Incentives Map

Featured Layouts

  • Mind Map

Instructions

Pretend that you like to play soccer. Make a mind map that explores all the incentives to go to soccer practice. In the description for each panel, explain what the incentive is and why it makes you want to practice.

Rubric: Incentives Map

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Sources are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Incentives 2 Businesses and Incentives

Featured Layouts

  • Poster

Intro

Businesses are experts at using incentives to drive sales. Have you ever seen two-for-one sales or discount pricing? What about the idea, "Buy now. This won't last long!" Or a free gift with your purchase?

These are all incentives designed to make people buy more of a good or service. If people think it's a good deal or that the deal may not last, they're more likely to buy now.

Instructions

Pretend you're the owner of an amusement park. What kind of incentives can you think of to encourage people to come visit your park? Create a poster advertising your incentives.

Rubric: Businesses and Incentives

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Sources are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total

Example Poster

Poster for Business Incentives by Student

Here's the link to share this comic:

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Incentives 3 To Make a Friend

Featured Layouts

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard
  • Graphic Novel
  • Timeline

Intro

Incentives apply whenever we're buying something, but also for all kinds of activities. We can consider both incentives and disincentives for any kind of decision.

Instructions

Draw a comic strip that shows someone deciding whether or not to make a new friend. They should consider both incentives and disincentives of reaching out to the new person. What do they decide to do?

Rubric: To Make a Friend

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Sources are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Incentives 4 What Career to Choose

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard

Intro

When we're making really big decisions, it's useful to look at incentives for various choices. It can help us make wise decisions.

Instructions

Pick out a job that you think you'd like to have one day. Brainstorm both the incentives and disincentives of choosing that job. Create a storyboard showing all the different motivations. In the description for each panel, write whether that factor would be an incentive for you to choose that job or a disincentive (that is, it would make you not want to choose that job).

Rubric: What Career to Choose

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Sources are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total

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