Over 16 million comics and storyboards created

Free!
Pixton Comic & Storyboard Maker

Lesson Plan by Cassie Bermel B. Ed.

Harrison Bergeron by Kurt Vonnegut

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings short stories to life with comics and storyboards.

Make short stories come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
Print All

Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Character Map
  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard
  • Graphic Novel
  • Mind Map

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings short stories to life with comics and storyboards.
Pixton Lesson Plan on Harrison Bergeron by Kurt Vonnegut
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings short stories to life with comics and storyboards.

Main Characters

Harrison Bergeron by Kurt Vonnegut

When you import any of the activities below, you can choose to share these ready-made characters with your students.

  • Harrison Bergeron from Harrison Bergeron by Kurt Vonnegut
    Harrison Bergeron

    14 years old and seven feet tall, he’s the most handicapped human in the society

  • George Bergeron from Harrison Bergeron by Kurt Vonnegut
    George Bergeron

    Harrison’s father and Hazel’s husband with advanced handicaps

  • Hazel Bergeron from Harrison Bergeron by Kurt Vonnegut
    Hazel Bergeron

    Harrison’s mother and George’s wife who is perfectly average

  • Diana Moon Glampers from Harrison Bergeron by Kurt Vonnegut
    Diana Moon Glampers

    The Handicapper General of the United States

  • The Ballerina-Turned-Announcer from Harrison Bergeron by Kurt Vonnegut
    The Ballerina-Turned-Announcer

    A highly handicapped dancer

  • The Announcer from Harrison Bergeron by Kurt Vonnegut
    The Announcer

    A newscaster with a speech impediment

Featured Props

Harrison Bergeron by Kurt Vonnegut

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Bag
    Bag
  • Bag
    Bag
  • Ball
    Ball
  • Bottle
    Bottle
  • Camera
    Camera
  • Chains
    Chains
  • Chair
    Chair
  • Curtain
    Curtain
  • Gun
    Gun
  • Lock
    Lock
  • Pen
    Pen
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

Harrison Bergeron by Kurt Vonnegut

Step 1Class discussion with students
  • What does it mean when people say “All people should be created equal"?

  • Would you want to live in a society where everyone is equal? Why / why not? What would that look like?

  • What does it mean to have a "handicap"? Try to think of different aspects of the word.
Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
Step 3Concluding discussion with students
  • What does the ending conversation between George and Hazel tell us about the society in which they live?

  • Is this what you imagined when you were asked to think about a society where everyone was equal? Do you think it’s possible to have an equal society that is better than this one?
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Harrison Bergeron 1 Character Map

Featured Layouts

  • Character Map

Intro

Understanding characterization is an important skill that will help reinforce key attributes of the story’s characters, and help create connections with the plot and theme. The characteristics that make up the protagonist and other characters help shape the outcome of the narrative.

Instructions

Create a Character Map for a character from Harrison Bergeron.

  • It's important to add sufficient detail to all the parts of the map.
  • Include an appropriate illustration based on the character's attributes that are outlined in the story.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Character Map

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The character map is thoughtful; descriptions are detailed and informative. The character map is fully developed; accurate details and insightful descriptions. The character map is complete; descriptions are simple and settings are accurate. The character map includes basic details, but is not fully developed. The character map does not accurately reflect the characters.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• summary is clear and highly detailed
• descriptions are thoughtful and highly developed
• significant details that make characters unique and dynamic
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• summary is clear and accurate
• logical descriptions that clarify and develop the idea
• characters are similar; includes relevant details
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• summary is short, but accurate
• descriptions are simple and consistent
• characters similar to description
• some relevant ideas
• summary has several errors
• descriptions are brief and lack detail
• characters vaguely looks like description
• often very brief
• summary is has significant errors
• descriptions are difficult to follow
• characters do not look like description
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is clear with little variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• basic language; vague at times
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• vague, incorrect and repetitive language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence • proper organization
• panels are thoughtful and detailed
• all panels are organized or logical
• all panels are present
• most panels are organized or logical
• all panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• some panels may be missing
• panels are not organized or logical
• panels are missing
Conventions The text demonstrates standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses eloquent words, rich sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses precise words, controlled sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates standard English conventions
• uses words and phrases, telling details and sensory language to convey a vivid picture
• demonstrates some accuracy in standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • contains multiple inaccuracies in Standard English conventions of usage and mechanics
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Harrison Bergeron 2 Imagery

Featured Layouts

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard
  • Graphic Novel
  • Mind Map

Intro

Translating words into images is an important skill to have, whether you physically draw the images or imagine them in your head. The more attention you pay to the words, the more detailed the image will be.

Instructions

Choose a scene from the story, and create 1-4 comic panels to represent it. Be sure to read the chosen section of the story carefully, paying attention to details.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Imagery

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The image is focused, has thoughtful details and is insightful. The image is clear, well developed, and logical. The image is easy to follow; ideas are correct, but may be basic or simple. The image discusses some relevant ideas, but may have frequent errors. The image is hard to follow; ideas are not developed.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Form Organization and sequence (beginning, middle, end) • proper organization
• sequence is highly effective and has purpose
• panels are thoughtful and detailed
• all panels are organized or logical
• logical sequence
• all panels are present
• most panels are organized or logical
• consistent attention to sequence
• all panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• some attention to sequence
• some panels may be missing
• panels are not organized or logical
• no attention to sequence
• panels are missing
Conventions Complete sentences, spelling, punctuation, grammar (e.g.,
use of pronouns; agreement; verb tense
• correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures • few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning • occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning • several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow • repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
Total

Example Comic Strip

Imagery in “Harrison Bergeron” by Student

Here's the link to share this comic:

Student Handout

Share this comic with your students to demonstrate the activity without giving away the farm :)

Imagery in “Cinderella” by Pixton
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Harrison Bergeron 3 Major Themes

Featured Layouts

  • Mind Map
  • Storyboard

Intro

Two major themes in Harrison Bergeron are:

  • The danger of total equality
  • The power of television

Instructions

For each major theme, identify at least two examples in the story and depict them in a Mind Map or Storyboard:

  • Identify the theme in the title or map center
  • Identify the paragraph number in the panel title
  • Create an image that summarizes the scene
  • Formulate a brief description of how the example fits the theme
  • In a final panel, briefly describe how the theme causes the reader to reflect

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Major Themes

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The theme is highly developed; examples have significant purpose and are highly detailed. The theme is well developed; examples are specific and provide ample support. The theme is briefly discussed; examples are accurate but not fully explained. The theme is poorly discussed; vague or irrelevant examples. The theme is not identified; lacks any supporting examples.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is clear with little variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• basic language; vague at times
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• vague, incorrect and repetitive language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence • proper organization
• examples are properly referenced
• panels are thoughtful and detailed
• all panels are organized or logical
• examples are properly referenced
• all panels are present
• most panels are organized or logical
• examples are properly referenced
• all panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• examples are not/improperly referenced
• some panels may be missing
• panels are not organized or logical
• examples are not referenced
• panels are missing
Conventions The text demonstrates standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses eloquent words, rich sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses precise words, controlled sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates standard English conventions
• uses words and phrases, telling details and sensory language to convey a vivid picture
• demonstrates some accuracy in standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • contains multiple inaccuracies in Standard English conventions of usage and mechanics
Total

Find more lesson plans:

  • MADE AT PIXTON.COM