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Lesson Plan by Lauren Martin M.Ed.

Hanukkah Classroom Activities

Pixton Lesson Plan on Hanukkah Classroom Activities

Make holidays come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
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Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard
  • Character Map
  • Poster
  • Graphic Novel

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

Pixton Lesson Plan on Hanukkah Classroom Activities
Pixton Lesson Plan on Hanukkah Classroom Activities
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings holidays to life with comics and storyboards.

Featured Props

Hanukkah Classroom Activities

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Book
    Book
  • Candlestick
    Candlestick
  • Coin
    Coin
  • Fire
    Fire
  • Jug
    Jug
  • Menorah
    Menorah
  • Paper
    Paper
  • Present
    Present
  • Roll
    Roll
  • Sword
    Sword
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

Hanukkah Classroom Activities

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

Review the History of Hanukkah

  • Hanukkah is a Jewish holiday celebrated for eight days and nights, beginning in November or December, on the 25th of Kislev on the Hebrew calendar. In ancient times, the Greek King of Syria outlawed Jewish rituals and ordered the Jews to worship Greek gods. In 168 B.C.E. the Jews' holy Temple in Jerusalem was taken and used to worship Zeus. Some Jews decided to fight back. Mattathias led the rebellion. About a year after the rebellion started, Mattathias died. Before his death, he put his son Judah in charge of the army. After three years of fighting, the Jews defeated the Greek army and won back the holy temple in 165 B.C.E. Judah was saddened that many things were stolen or broken, including the golden menorah.
  • When Judah and his soldiers renewed the Temple, they held a dedication ceremony. For the celebration, Judah wanted to light the menorah. He looked everywhere for oil, and found a small flask that contained only enough oil to light the menorah for one day. Miraculously, the oil lasted for eight days. Hanukkah celebrates the victory that reclaimed the holy Temple in Jerusalem. In Hebrew, the word "Hanukkah" means "dedication."
  • During Hanukkah, Jews light one candle on the menorah every night for eight days in dedication to the eight-day miracle. Today, presents are also exchanged every night. This gift-giving component is a result of the advertised materialism that now coincides with the Christmas and Hanukkah season. The traditional colors of Hanukkah are blue and silver. Many families make challah bread, which is a braided loaf of bread. Children play dreidel by spinning a four sided top. Each side has one of four Hebrew letters: Nun, Gimel, Hei or Chai, and Shin. The letters are an acronym for the Hebrew saying, Nes Gadol Hayah Sham, which means "a great miracle happened there" - the miracle of Hanukkah.

Opening Discussion

Discuss the following:

  • What did you already know about the history and traditions of Hanukkah?
  • What surprised you about the history and traditions of Hanukkah?
  • What are some modern-day Hanukkah traditions and activities?
Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Comic Strip or Storyboard
    The History of Hanukkah

    Complete after opening discussion.

    View Activity
  • Make a Comic Strip or Storyboard
    Hanukkah Traditions

    Complete after class discussion.

    View Activity
  • Make a Character Map
    Create your own Challah

    Complete after class discussion.

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Poster (Extension / Modification)

    Design your own Poster menorah.

  • Extension / Modification
    Graphic Novel (Extension / Modification)

    There are many children's stories about various holidays. Create a Graphic Novel to tell a fictional story about Hanukkah.

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Discuss the following:

  • What Hanukkah traditions have you ever participated in?
  • What Hanukkah traditions would you like to participate in?
  • What other traditions would you like to adopt to celebrate the miracle of Hanukkah?
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Hanukkah Classroom Activities 1 The History of Hanukkah

Featured Layouts

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard

Intro

Review the History of Hanukkah

  • Hanukkah is a Jewish holiday celebrated for eight days and nights, beginning in November or December, on the 25th of Kislev on the Hebrew calendar. In ancient times, the Greek King of Syria outlawed Jewish rituals and ordered the Jews to worship Greek gods. In 168 B.C.E. the Jews' holy Temple in Jerusalem was taken and used to worship Zeus. Some Jews decided to fight back. Mattathias led the rebellion. About a year after the rebellion started, Mattathias died. Before his death, he put his son Judah in charge of the army. After three years of fighting, the Jews defeated the Greek army and won back the holy temple in 165 B.C.E. Judah was saddened that many things were stolen or broken, including the golden menorah.
  • When Judah and his soldiers renewed the Temple, they held a dedication ceremony. For the celebration, Judah wanted to light the menorah. He looked everywhere for oil, and found a small flask that contained only enough oil to light the menorah for one day. Miraculously, the oil lasted for eight days. Hanukkah celebrates the victory that reclaimed the holy Temple in Jerusalem. In Hebrew, the word "Hanukkah" means "dedication."
  • During Hanukkah, Jews light one candle on the menorah every night for eight days in dedication to the eight-day miracle. Today, presents are also exchanged every night. This gift-giving component is a result of the advertised materialism that now coincides with the Christmas and Hanukkah season. The traditional colors of Hanukkah are blue and silver. Many families make challah bread, which is a braided loaf of bread. Children play dreidel by spinning a four sided top. Each side has one of four Hebrew letters: Nun, Gimel, Hei or Chai, and Shin. The letters are an acronym for the Hebrew saying, Nes Gadol Hayah Sham, which means "a great miracle happened there" - the miracle of Hanukkah.

Instructions

Create a Comic Strip or Storyboard to illustrate the history of Hanukkah.

  • Include an appropriate description or dialogue for each panel.
  • Include appropriate illustrations for each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Example Comic Strip

The History of Hanukkah by Student

Here's the link to share this comic:

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Hanukkah Classroom Activities 2 Hanukkah Traditions

Featured Layouts

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard

Intro

During Hanukkah, Jewish families light one candle on the menorah every night for eight days in dedication to the eight-day miracle. Today, presents are also exchanged every night. This gift-giving component is a result of the commercialism that now coincides with the Christmas and Hanukkah season. The traditional colors of Hanukkah are blue and silver. Many families make challah bread, which is a braided loaf of bread. Children play dreidel by spinning a four sided top. Each side has one of four Hebrew letters: Nun, Gimel, Hei or Chai, and Shin. The letters are an acronym for the Hebrew saying, Nes Gadol Hayah Sham, which means "a great miracle happened there" - the miracle of Hanukkah.

Instructions

Create a Comic Strip or Storyboard to illustrate the modern traditions of Hanukkah.

  • Include an appropriate description or dialogue for each panel.
  • Include appropriate illustrations for each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Example Comic Strip

Hanukkah Traditions by Student

Here's the link to share this comic:

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Hanukkah Classroom Activities 3 Create your own Challah

Featured Layouts

  • Character Map

Intro

Students will have an opportunity to create a magical loaf of challah using a Character Map to describe and illustrate its special features and possibly magical components. As they describe their challah, they will include sensory language and specific details to practice expository and creative writing skills.

Instructions

Create a Character Map to describe and illustrate your loaf of challah using sensory details.

  • It's important to add as many details as you can to all the parts of the map.
  • Include an appropriate illustration.
  • Use sensory language (touch, taste, sight, smell, sound).

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Create your own Challah

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The character map is fully developed with details that add significant meaning. The character map is complete; descriptions and details are thoughtful and accurate. The character map is complete; descriptions are basic, but accurate. The character map is incomplete; basic descriptions with little relevant details. The character map is incomplete; descriptions are short or inaccurate.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• significant details that make characters unique and dynamic
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• characters are similar; includes relevant details
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• characters similar to description
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• characters vaguey looks like description
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
• characters do not look like description
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is appropriate; lacks variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• simple language; vague and lacks purpose
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• inappropriate use of language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence • proper organization
• panels are thoughtful and detailed
• all panels are organized or logical
• all panels are present
• most panels are organized or logical
• all panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• some panels may be missing
• panels are not organized or logical
• panels are missing
Conventions Complete sentences, spelling, punctuation, grammar (e.g.,
use of pronouns; agreement; verb tense
• correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures • few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning • occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning • several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow • repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
Total

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