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Lesson Plan by Mitchell Zuvela B. Sc., B. Ed.

Growth of the Colonies (1700-1775)

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings American history to life with comics and storyboards.

Make American history come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
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Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard
  • Graphic Novel

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

Pixton Lesson Plan on Growth of the Colonies (1700-1775)
Pixton Lesson Plan on Growth of the Colonies (1700-1775)
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings American history to life with comics and storyboards.

Featured Props

Growth of the Colonies (1700-1775)

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  • Arrow
    Arrow
  • Cross
    Cross
  • Drum
    Drum
  • Feather
    Feather
  • Field
    Field
  • Flag
    Flag
  • Gun
    Gun
  • River
    River
  • Ship
    Ship
  • Tree
    Tree
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Teacher Guide

Growth of the Colonies (1700-1775)

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

Slavery

The LearnNC.org website has several excellent documents and interviews discussing the life of an African American slave in the South.

Taxation

“No taxation without representation” was a famous slogan during the 1750s and 60s. The slogan summarized the belief held by American colonists that no taxes should be paid without representation in British Parliament. It was first coined in 1750 in a sermon by a pastor named Jonathan Mayhew. The slogan summarized the main grievance of the American colonists in the Thirteen Colonies, which was a contributing factor to the outbreak of the American Revolution.

Opening Discussion

Slavery

While you read excerpts from documents and interviews about slavery, encourage your class to write down key words or sketch as they listen. Discuss with your class the thoughts and feelings they have about the conditions faced by black slaves during this time period:

  • Was it fair?
  • Why did it happen?
  • For how long did it happen?
Taxation

Discuss with your class the importance of the slogan, “No taxation without representation,” in giving power to the colonists in the face of increasing British imperialism through the implementation of various Acts. How did the Boston Tea Party foreshadow future events?

Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Storyboard, Comic Strip, or ...
    Life of A Slave

    View Activity
  • Make a Comic Strip, Storyboard, or ...
    Middle Passage

    View Activity
  • Make a Storyboard
    Boston Tea Party

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Analyze (Extension / Modification)

    Identify reasons why educational institutions in the colonies were founded (e.g. Harvard, College of William and Mary).

  • Extension / Modification
    Discuss (Extension / Modification)

    Identify the first 13 colonies and research the regional differences in climate, types of farming, populations, and sources of labor.

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Explain the reasons why language, political institutions, and political principles of what became the United States of America were largely shaped by English colonists, even though other major European nations had also explored and populated the New World.

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Pixton Activity: Growth of the Colonies (1700-1775) 1 Life of A Slave

Featured Layouts

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard
  • Graphic Novel

Intro

The life of an African American slave was harsh and brutal. Long hours working in the fields, poor nutrition, and inadequate shelter made everyday life difficult. Slaves were allowed some privileges outside of work, which included tending to a garden, sewing, and hosting social gatherings. Since slaves had very few rights, owners were able to trade, beat, and exploit them with little recourse. Life was difficult, but many African Americans started a family in hopes that they would one day be free.

Instructions

Create a 6-10 panel Comic Strip that illustrates a day in the life of an African American slave. Be sure to demonstrate the harsh daily conditions they faced.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Life of A Slave

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Source are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total

Example Comic Strip

Life of a Slave by Student

Here's the link to share this comic:

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Pixton Activity: Growth of the Colonies (1700-1775) 2 Middle Passage

Featured Layouts

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard
  • Graphic Novel

Instructions

Research the Middle Passage and its importance to the African slave trade.

Create a 3-6 panel Storyboard illustrating the steps that took place in the triangular trade that was involved in the Middle Passage.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Middle Passage

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Source are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total
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Pixton Activity: Growth of the Colonies (1700-1775) 3 Boston Tea Party

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard

Intro

The destruction of tea in Boston was an iconic event that signified the defiant attitude that American colonists had towards the British. This event was in response to the Tea Act in which the British began taxing teas that were imported to America. The Boston Tea Party was a key event leading up to the American Revolution.

Instructions

Create a 6-10 panel Storyboard illustrating the events that led up to the Boston Tea Party, including the event itself.

Be sure to discuss:

  • The French and Indian War
  • The Sugar Act
  • The Tea Act
  • The Stamp Act

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Boston Tea Party

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Source are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total

Example Storyboard

The Boston Tea Party by Student

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