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Lesson Plan by Cassie Bermel B. Ed.

Gender In The Media

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This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings digital citizenship to life with comics and storyboards.
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings digital citizenship to life with comics and storyboards.
Pixton Lesson Plan on Gender In The Media

Featured Props

Gender In The Media

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Bottle
    Bottle
  • Magazine
    Magazine
  • Mirror
    Mirror
  • Prop Sewing Machine
    Prop Sewing Machine
  • Radio
    Radio
  • Rainbow
    Rainbow
  • Rose
    Rose
  • Sign
    Sign
  • Suitcase
    Suitcase
  • Television
    Television
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

Gender In The Media

Step 1Class discussion with students

Split the male and female students into two groups. Ask the boys, “What does it mean to be a girl?” and ask the girls, “What does it mean to be a boy?” Think about the following aspects when creating a list:

  • Ideal body type
  • Personality
  • Clothes people wear
  • How people act in relationships
  • Activities / hobbies
  • Household roles
  • Jobs
  • Posting on social media sites

Afterwards, get into mixed groups and compare notes. Discuss how it makes students feel to see their own gender stereotypes. What is artificial about these assumptions?

Discuss how men and women are portrayed in movies. Is it different in reality shows, advertisements or music? How is it realistic, and how is it not? Afterwards, watch Gender Stereotypes in Media to compare.

Watch Dove: Evolution of a Model and The Male Version. What effects do these images in media have on how we view ourselves?

What does it mean to “Act Like A Man”? What about “Acting Lady-Like?” Is this realistic? Where do we learn these roles? What effects might this have on a boy and his upbringing? What do we call boys who don’t fit this gender role? Girls?

Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
Step 3Concluding discussion with students
  • Having analyzed stereotypes and where they come from, how do you think we can change this? Do we need to?

  • What can we do to keep a realistic perspective on ourselves and our bodies?
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Pixton Activity: Gender In The Media 1 Students In The Media Vs. Reality

Intro

In the introduction you discussed how people are portrayed in the media, in contrast to reality. Think about this discussion for the following activity.

Instructions

Using a 6 panel Storyboard, show the difference between how teens are portrayed in media versus reality.

  • Create three panels to show how teens are portrayed in tv shows, movies, music or other forms of media, and the last three panels to show a realistic view of a teenager’s life.

See the rubric for guidelines.

Rubric: Students In The Media Vs. Reality

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The image is focused, has thoughtful details and is insightful. The image is clear, well developed, and logical. The image is easy to follow; ideas are correct, but may be basic or simple. The image discusses some relevant ideas, but may have frequent errors. The image is hard to follow; ideas are not developed.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Conventions Complete sentences, spelling, punctuation, grammar (e.g.,
use of pronouns; agreement; verb tense
• correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures • few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning • occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning • several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow • repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
Total
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Pixton Activity: Gender In The Media 2 Analyzing Gender Stereotypes

Intro

In the introduction, you did an activity comparing gender stereotypes. Keep that in mind when doing the following activity.

Instructions

In a 3-5 panel Storyboard, create images of how your gender is portrayed in society or the media.

  • In your explanation below each panel, explain why these stereotypes are not accurate, or not fair.

See the rubric for guidelines.

Rubric: Analyzing Gender Stereotypes

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The image is focused, has thoughtful details and is insightful. The image is clear, well developed, and logical. The image is easy to follow; ideas are correct, but may be basic or simple. The image discusses some relevant ideas, but may have frequent errors. The image is hard to follow; ideas are not developed.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • clearly shows gender stereotypes in the media
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• clearly shows gender stereotypes in the media
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• shows gender stereotypes in the media
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• somewhat shows gender stereotypes in the media
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• gender stereotypes in the media are not shown
• few details or descriptions
Conventions Complete sentences, spelling, punctuation, grammar (e.g.,
use of pronouns; agreement; verb tense
• correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures • few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning • occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning • several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow • repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Gender In The Media 3 The Effects of Enforcing Gender Roles

Intro

In earlier discussions, your class talked about what it means to "act like a man" or "be ladylike". Think about those discussions for the following activity. You can watch the Trailer for The Mask You Live In to help you.

Instructions

Create a 3-5 panel Storyboard, explaining the effects that telling a child to "act like a man" or "be lady-like" can have on their development and behavior.

  • You must have at least one panel for each gender.

See rubric for guidelines.

Rubric: The Effects of Enforcing Gender Roles

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The image is focused, has thoughtful details and is insightful. The image is clear, well developed, and logical. The image is easy to follow; ideas are correct, but may be basic or simple. The image discusses some relevant ideas, but may have frequent errors. The image is hard to follow; ideas are not developed.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Conventions Complete sentences, spelling, punctuation, grammar (e.g.,
use of pronouns; agreement; verb tense
• correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures • few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning • occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning • several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow • repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
Total

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