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Lesson Plan by Mitchell Zuvela B. Sc., B. Ed.

Four Types of Conflict

Pixton Lesson Plan on Four Types of Conflict

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Pixton Lesson Plan on Four Types of Conflict
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings the elements of a story to life with comics and storyboards.
Pixton Lesson Plan on Four Types of Conflict

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Four Types of Conflict

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Teacher Guide

Four Types of Conflict

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

Ask your class to discuss the following question: “What is conflict?”. Brainstorm examples of various conflicts that your students face in their everyday life. Organize their thoughts in a Mind Map on the whiteboard. Work with the class to start narrowing down and grouping their examples so they fit the four main types of literary conflict.

Man vs. Man

  • Involves an external conflict between the protagonist and antagonist. This type of conflict is very common and can be seen in many traditional stories, myths, and fairy tales. A conflict may involve a direct confrontation (gun fight), or be more subtle (feud between rival families). Some examples include: "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer," "Harry Potter," and "The Outsiders."

Man vs. Nature

  • Involves an external conflict in which the protagonist struggles against a force of nature such as a tornado, or angry swarm of bees. Some examples include: "Robinson Crusoe," "Lord of the Flies," and "Life of Pi."

Man vs. Self

  • Involves an internal conflict within the protagonist usually due to an external struggle. Generally the struggle is between good and evil or maintaining moral standards. Some examples include: "Hamlet," "Requiem for a Dream," and "Death of a Salesman."

Man vs. Society

  • Involves an internal or external conflict where the protagonist stands against a man-made institution (corporation) or social norm (bullying). Some examples include: "Fahrenheit 451," "Charlotte's Web," and "The Giver."

Opening Discussion

What are some examples of conflict that we can find in literature and movies? Can there be more than one type of conflict? Their knowledge may be limited, so don't be afraid to use more relevant examples if necessary. Many writers will build multiple conflicts in their plot to engage the reader on multiple levels. For example, "The Life of Pi" has all four types of conflict present, however, some conflicts are more important than others. With the rate at which technology is advancing, could the future see a conflict between man and technology?

Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Comic
    Determining Conflict

    View Activity
  • Make a Comic
    Illustrating Conflict

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Analyze (Extension / Modification)

    Include Man vs. Supernatural as a fifth example that students must find examples for.

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Some scholars include a fifth category of conflict called “Man vs. Supernatural”. Ask the class whether they believe that the supernatural would fall under the category of “Man vs. Nature” or something different. What examples would fit in this category? What type of conflict would religion fall under?

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Pixton Activity: Four Types of Conflict 1 Determining Conflict

Instructions

Create a Table or Storyboard to help illustrate examples of conflict.

  • Use a play, movie, or novel as an example for identifying the key types of conflict that are present.

There may be more than one type, so it is important that you thoroughly analyze your selection.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Determining Conflict

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview Multiple types of conflict are fully discussed: all examples are thoroughly discussed. More than one type of conflict is fully discussed; examples are well developed and precise. More than one type of conflict is briefly discussed; examples provide sufficient support. One type of conflict is briefly discussed; examples show limited support. One type of conflict is poorly discussed; lacks supporting examples.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is clear with little variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• basic language; vague at times
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• vague, incorrect and repetitive language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence (supporting examples identified) • proper organization
• examples are properly referenced
• panels are thoughtful and detailed
• all panels are organized or logical
• examples are properly referenced
• all panels are present
• most panels are organized or logical
• examples are properly referenced
• all panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• examples are not/improperly referenced
• some panels may be missing
• panels are not organized or logical
• examples are not referenced
• panels are missing
Conventions The text demonstrates standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses eloquent words, rich sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses precise words, controlled sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates standard English conventions
• uses words and phrases, telling details and sensory language to convey a vivid picture
• demonstrates some accuracy in standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • contains multiple inaccuracies in Standard English conventions of usage and mechanics
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Four Types of Conflict 2 Illustrating Conflict

Instructions

Create a 3-4 panel Comic Strip that illustrates one of the four types of literary conflict.

  • Each panel should demonstrate an external or internal conflict and have sufficient detail to exemplify the conflict chosen.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Illustrating Conflict

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview Multiple types of conflict are fully discussed: all examples are thoroughly discussed. More than one type of conflict is fully discussed; examples are well developed and precise. More than one type of conflict is briefly discussed; examples provide sufficient support. One type of conflict is briefly discussed; examples show limited support. One type of conflict is poorly discussed; lacks supporting examples.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is clear with little variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• basic language; vague at times
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• vague, incorrect and repetitive language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence (supporting examples identified) • proper organization
• examples are properly referenced
• panels are thoughtful and detailed
• all panels are organized or logical
• examples are properly referenced
• all panels are present
• most panels are organized or logical
• examples are properly referenced
• all panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• examples are not/improperly referenced
• some panels may be missing
• panels are not organized or logical
• examples are not referenced
• panels are missing
Conventions The text demonstrates standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses eloquent words, rich sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses precise words, controlled sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates standard English conventions
• uses words and phrases, telling details and sensory language to convey a vivid picture
• demonstrates some accuracy in standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • contains multiple inaccuracies in Standard English conventions of usage and mechanics
Total

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