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Lesson Plan by Mitchell Zuvela B. Sc., B. Ed.

Formation and Framework of Democracy

Pixton Lesson Plan on Formation and Framework of Democracy

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Pixton Lesson Plan on Formation and Framework of Democracy
Pixton Lesson Plan on Formation and Framework of Democracy
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings American history to life with comics and storyboards.

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Formation and Framework of Democracy

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Teacher Guide

Formation and Framework of Democracy

Step 1Class discussion with students

Ask your class the following questions to initiate a class discussion.

  • What is the purpose of our government?
  • Why do we pay taxes?
  • What do our taxes pay for?
  • Does the U.S. government spend money wisely?
  • What should be the number one goal of the government?
  • What are the different branches of our government?
Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Comic
    Types of Government

    View Activity
  • Make a Comic
    Roles / Responsibilities of Government

    View Activity
  • Make a Comic
    What does our Government do?

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Discuss (Extension / Modification)

    Explain the evolution and function of political parties, including their role in federal, state, and local elections.

  • Extension / Modification
    Poster (Extension / Modification)

    Design a Poster that compares and contrasts the policies of the Democratic and Republican parties.

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Explore the major components of your state's government, including the roles and functions of the governor, state legislature, and other constitutional officers.

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Formation and Framework of Democracy 1 Types of Government

Instructions

Create a Mind Map discussing the different types of government such as:

  • Democracy
  • Monarchy
  • Oligarchy
  • Theocracy
  • Authoritarian
  • Autocracy

Each panel should include:

  • An appropriate graphic
  • A detailed description

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Types of Government

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Source are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total

Example Mind Map

Types of Government by Student
Mind MapTheocracy DemocracyIn a democratic government, all people of the state are involved in making political decisions. Citizens are given the choice to vote for a specific candidate and political party of law. A democracy requires free elections, a voting public, protection of human rights, and voting equality amongst its citizens. MonarchyA monarchy is a form of government in which the sovereignty of a state is embodied by one individual or family known as a monarch. Monarchies that have few or no legal restraints are called absolute monarchies. Monarchies that have a limited role or power are called constitutional monarchies. The head of a monarchy usually carries the role until their death. OligarchyAn oligarchy is a form of government in which the power rests in a small group of people. These people are usually privileged educators, politicians, royalty, or military leaders. Oligarchies are often tyrannical, requiring public obedience or oppression to exist. TheocracyA theocracy is a form of government that is ruled by someone who is guided by the divine. Typically, this form of government occurs when a religious leader rules a state, such as a Pope. Many feudal empires were ruled in the name of God. Countless wars, such as The Crusades, were fought by states under theocratic rule. AuthoritarianAn authoritarian government is characterized by political constraints, decisions based on emotion, repressive tactics, and shifting political powers. Authoritarian regimes generally come to power by military force or through public support by the lower class or a repressed group. AutocracyAn autocracy is a form of government in which one person has supreme control of the government. They are neither restrained by laws, or political parties. The most common form of autocracy is a dictatorship.

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Pixton Activity: Formation and Framework of Democracy 2 Roles / Responsibilities of Government

Instructions

Complete a Mind Map comparing the roles and responsibilities of federal, state, and local governments in the United States.

Your table should include:

  • An appropriate graphic
  • A detailed description

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Roles / Responsibilities of Government

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Source are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total
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Pixton Activity: Formation and Framework of Democracy 3 What does our Government do?

Instructions

Complete a Storyboard summarizing the type of services that the U.S. government provides including:

  • Public services
  • Taxation
  • Economics
  • Social programs
  • National defense

Each panel should include:

  • An appropriate graphic
  • A detailed description

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: What does our Government do?

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Source are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total

Example Storyboard

What does our Government do? by Student
TaxationThe U.S. government collects taxes on income, payroll, property, sales, capital gains, dividends, imports, estates and gifts, as well as various fees. Tax dollars are collected and distributed at the Federal, State and local levels. Most states impose a sales tax that collect taxes on the sale of goods. Taxes make up about 25% of the U.S. GDP. Taxation rates typically range from 10% to 35% of deductible earnings. Social SecuritySocial security is a Federal program that provides financial assistance through old age security, survivors, and disability insurance. It is paid for through payroll taxes. All salaried income, up to a maximum of $115,000, is taxed for Social Security benefits. It is estimated that social security keeps 20% of the retired population in the U.S. above the poverty line. TransportationAll levels of the U.S. government spend about $416 billion on transportation each year. The transportation budget is spent on roads, mass transit, aviation, and water utilities. Increases in transportation spending will be required to fund repairs to failing infrastructure built in the 1950s or 1960s. Food Stamps (SNAP)Food Stamps provide food purchasing assistance for people living in the U.S. who are in poverty. It is a Federal aid program that spends about $75 billion a year. About 47 million U.S. citizens use Food Stamps yearly, which equates to about $125 per month for each person. A new system has recently been adopted that uses debit transactions instead of individual stamps.

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