Over 16 million comics and storyboards created

Free!
Pixton Comic & Storyboard Maker

Lesson Plan by Mitchell Zuvela B. Sc., B. Ed.

First Four U.S. Presidencies

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings American history to life with comics and storyboards.

Make American history come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
Print All

Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Timeline
  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard
  • Graphic Novel
  • Poster

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings American history to life with comics and storyboards.
Pixton Lesson Plan on First Four U.S. Presidencies
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings American history to life with comics and storyboards.

Featured Props

First Four U.S. Presidencies

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Boat
    Boat
  • Cannon
    Cannon
  • Field
    Field
  • Fireplace
    Fireplace
  • Flag
    Flag
  • Gun
    Gun
  • Podium
    Podium
  • Seashore
    Seashore
  • Tree
    Tree
  • Waterfall
    Waterfall
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

First Four U.S. Presidencies

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

Watch the PBS video “The American Capital Burns” for an introduction to the War of 1812.

Opening Discussion

George Washington was the first president of the United States, thus giving him the title “father of his country”. Washington was a powerful political leader, and an admirable military commander during his two terms in office. His portrait was hung in the first White House as a symbol of strength and leadership. His importance to American history is timeless. His face can be found on numerous monuments, paintings, and on the one dollar bill.

During The War of 1812, the British made a move towards the town of Washington to deliver a crippling blow to the Americans. Hours before British troops stormed the White House, the President's wife, Dolley Madison, saved a famous painting of George Washington from falling into the hands of the enemy. She believed that Washington’s painting was a powerful symbol of victory over the British during the American Revolution. Even though the British were successful in their attack upon the capital, the United States learned many valuable lessons, including the importance of a national army. The painting, still hanging in the White House today, remains a symbol of American history.

Discuss with your class the role of symbolism in building an identity for a nation, school, or family. Are there any important symbolic objects that your school or family treasures? Why is it symbolic? How would you feel if that object fell into the hands of an enemy?

Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Timeline
    Expedition of Lewis and Clark

    View Activity
  • Make a Timeline
    War of 1812

    View Activity
  • Make a Graphic Novel, Comic Strip, or ...
    The New Frontier

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Graphic Novel (Extension / Modification)

    Create a Graphic Novel depicting the fall of Custer at the Battle of Little Bighorn.

  • Extension / Modification
    Poster (Extension / Modification)

    Create an informative Poster to be used to convince people to settle the West.

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Watch the movie “Little Big Man” with your class to better understand the life of a settler in the new frontier. The movie will also illustrate the poor relations between settlers and aboriginals at this time. Further research and time can be spent learning about Colonel Custer and the Battle of Little Bighorn through various activities. (Note: the movie is rated PG-13 and should be previewed for suitability.)

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: First Four U.S. Presidencies 1 Expedition of Lewis and Clark

Featured Layouts

  • Timeline

Intro

The first great American expedition was a journey across the newly acquired state of Louisiana, through the Rockies, reaching the West Coast. The main goals of the journey were to explore, map the area, create routes, acquire new territory, establish trade with aboriginals, and study the plants and animals. The expedition was led by Meriwether Lewis and William Clark between 1804 and 1806.

Instructions

Summarize the events that happened during the Expedition of Lewis and Clark by looking through the timeline found on Wikipedia. Choose six to ten events that you believe are important and create a condensed Timeline.

Each panel should include:

  • A title that provides the date
  • A concise description of the event
  • An appropriate illustration

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Expedition of Lewis and Clark

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Source are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: First Four U.S. Presidencies 2 War of 1812

Featured Layouts

  • Timeline

Instructions

Create a Timeline identifying the events that occurred during the War of 1812. Be sure to include several major battles such as the burning of the White House, and the Battle of New Orleans.

Each panel should include:

  • The date in the title
  • A detailed description
  • An appropriate illustration

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: War of 1812

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Source are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: First Four U.S. Presidencies 3 The New Frontier

Featured Layouts

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard
  • Graphic Novel

Intro

Many American settlers moved West in search of cheap land. These settlers usually traveled by horse and wagon, looking for suitable land for farms, ranches, and mining. Land was not always easy to find as much of the West had already been claimed through treaties, battles, and political compromise. The United States sought to settle the West in order to create stability, stake claim to distant territories, and increase political influence.

Instructions

Create a comic illustrating the daily life of settlers in the wild West or new frontier.

  • Research the Oregon Trail and the Santa Fe Trail for background information.
  • Include the hardships that were faced by these adventurers.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: The New Frontier

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Source are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total

Example Comic

The New Frontier by Student

Here's the link to share this comic:

Find more lesson plans:

  • MADE AT PIXTON.COM