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Lesson Plan by Maggie M. Larche M.A.

Entrepreneurship for High Schoolers

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings economic concepts to life with comics and storyboards.

Make economic concepts come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
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Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Mind Map
  • Storyboard
  • Character Map
  • Comic Strip
  • Graphic Novel
  • Timeline

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

Pixton Lesson Plan on Entrepreneurship for High Schoolers
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings economic concepts to life with comics and storyboards.
Pixton Lesson Plan on Entrepreneurship for High Schoolers

Featured Props

Entrepreneurship for High Schoolers

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Beam
    Beam
  • Building
    Building
  • Doors
    Doors
  • Money
    Money
  • Podium
    Podium
  • Prop Cloth Bag
    Prop Cloth Bag
  • Prop Mic Stand
    Prop Mic Stand
  • Prop Office Building
    Prop Office Building
  • Screen
    Screen
  • Spanner
    Spanner
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Teacher Guide

Entrepreneurship for High Schoolers

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

Write five categories on the board: 0-20%, 20-40%, 40-60%, 60-80%, and 80-100%.

Ask students to guess what percentage of businesses in the United States have 20 or fewer employees. Go down the categories on the board, totalling the number of votes for each category. Once all votes are in, reveal that the true number is a whopping 97.9%. Stress that each one of those businesses was started by someone. That someone is an entrepreneur.

Opening Discussion

Tell students that an entrepreneur is someone that starts and runs his or her own business. Some may run multi-national companies, while others may sell homemade furniture out of their garage, but they are all classified as entrepreneurs. Unlike employees, entrepreneurs work for themselves. Explain that it's a very different experience than most workers, but it can come with many perks. And undoubtedly, entrepreneurs drive much of our economic growth.

Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Mind Map
    Risks and Benefits

    You may wish to brainstorm some risks and benefits together as a class before students complete their comics.

    View Activity
  • Make a Storyboard
    Profits

    View Activity
  • Make a Character Map
    Entrepreneur vs. Employee

    View Activity
  • Make a Comic Strip, Timeline, or ...
    Invention vs. Innovation

    View Activity
Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Remind your students that not everyone is cut out to be an entrepreneur, and nor should they be. But for those with the itch to start their own businesses, entrepreneurship can be a very fulfilling career path.

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Pixton Activity: Entrepreneurship for High Schoolers 1 Risks and Benefits

Featured Layouts

  • Mind Map

Intro

As you might expect, being an entrepreneur can be a risky proposition. Without a big company behind you to pay your bills, it's an uncertain path. Many entrepreneurs start out and go for months or even years without making any money.

Of course, there are some benefits to being an entrepreneur as well. Entrepreneurs are able to be their own bosses and try new things.

What other risks and benefits do you think would go along with being an entrepreneur?

Instructions

Create two mind maps, one for risks and one for benefits. In each, explore at least three risks or three benefits of becoming an entrepreneur. Be creative as you think of both the incentives and disincentives for entrepreneurship. Title each panel and use the description to explain the risk or benefit.

Rubric: Risks and Benefits

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Sources are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Entrepreneurship for High Schoolers 2 Profits

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard

Intro

Entrepreneurs don't receive a salary or wage from a parent company like employees do. Instead, they are paid out of profits of the business.

Profit is income minus expenses. In other words, it's how much money is left from revenues after all the bills have been paid. As the owner of the business, all profits belong to the entrepreneur.

There is quite a bit more volatility in profits than there are in a steady paycheck. An entrepreneur may have a sky-high income one month and make almost nothing the next. It all depends on how the business does. An employee, on the other hand, would typically receive the same paycheck from month to month.

Instructions

Say you have started a musical instrument store. Create a storyboard that shows how your profit is calculated. In one or more panels, show where revenues come from. In the remaining panels, show at least three major expenses that the entrepreneur must pay. Explain both revenues and expenses in the description for each panel.

The difference between the total revenues and total expenses is what the entrepreneur would make for that month. That's the profit.

Rubric: Profits

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Sources are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Entrepreneurship for High Schoolers 3 Entrepreneur vs. Employee

Featured Layouts

  • Character Map

Intro

As you've seen, there are many differences between being an entrepreneur versus an employee.

Instructions

Create two character maps, one for an entrepreneur and one for an employee. In the center of each, create an illustration of the character.

Title the side panels with the following categories:

  • Definition
  • Relation to Risk
  • Income Source
  • Key Attributes

Fill in each category for an entrepreneur and for an employee.

Rubric: Entrepreneur vs. Employee

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Sources are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Entrepreneurship for High Schoolers 4 Invention vs. Innovation

Featured Layouts

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard
  • Graphic Novel
  • Mind Map
  • Timeline

Intro

Not all entrepreneurs start businesses that are on the cutting edge of technology. For every tech startup, there are dozens of successful entrepreneurs running traditional businesses like dry cleaners, grocery stores, and mechanic shops. However, because of their independence, many entrepreneurs are able to try out new things and products.

In this area, entrepreneurs engage in either invention or innovation.

An invention is a product that is completely new. An innovation is an improvement to an existing product, something that improves its use. For all you hear about inventions, innovations are actually far more common, but both are very important engines to drive economic growth.

Instructions

Create a comic with two panels, one that shows what you think is best described as an invention and one that shows an innovation. Either in the description or through dialogue, explain how it qualifies as one or the other.

Note that this is not a perfectly clear-cut distinction, but most changes can be loosely classified as one or the other.

Rubric: Invention vs. Innovation

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Sources are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total

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