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Lesson Plan by Maggie M. Larche M.A.

Entrepreneurship

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings economic concepts to life with comics and storyboards.

Make economic concepts come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
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Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map
  • Timeline

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

Pixton Lesson Plan on Entrepreneurship
Pixton Lesson Plan on Entrepreneurship
Pixton Lesson Plan on Entrepreneurship

Featured Props

Entrepreneurship

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Blackboard
    Blackboard
  • Briefcase
    Briefcase
  • Bulb
    Bulb
  • Clipboard
    Clipboard
  • Desk
    Desk
  • Globe
    Globe
  • Laptop
    Laptop
  • Money
    Money
  • Question
    Question
  • Stairs
    Stairs
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

Entrepreneurship

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

Ask your students to raise their hands if they think they'd like to work for themselves one day. Ask how many students like to take risks. Ask who likes to try new things. Tell those students that they might just be cut out to be entrepreneurs.

Opening Discussion

Explain to students that an entrepreneur is someone who starts and runs her own business. It doesn't matter what kind of business it is or how big the business is. Every successful business has an entrepreneur behind it all.

Tell students that an entrepreneur doesn't work for anyone else like an employee does. Instead of getting a paycheck as an employee would, an entrepreneur is paid from the profits of his business.

Ask your students if they know any entrepreneurs. Ask them to share examples.

Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Timeline, Storyboard, or ...
    Benefits of Entrepreneurship

    View Activity
  • Make a Mind Map
    Kinds of Businesses

    View Activity
  • Make a Timeline
    Be an Entrepreneur

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Famous Entrepreneurs (Extension / Modification)

    Have students select a famous entrepreneur and create a comic showing his struggle to start his business.

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Remind your students that there are many exciting career paths, and entrepreneurship is just one of them. But for those who are interested in running their own business one day, it can be a rewarding job.

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Entrepreneurship 1 Benefits of Entrepreneurship

Featured Layouts

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map
  • Timeline

Intro

Entrepreneurship is a difficult career path. Entrepreneurs work very long hours, and, many times, their businesses fail. When they first start out, they may go for months or years without earning anything!

However, there are many benefits to being an entrepreneur as well. They get to try new things, be their own bosses, and feel proud of building their own companies. Many entrepreneurs find that the benefits outweigh the risks.

Instructions

Pick two of the benefits listed above and come up with at least one more on your own. Create a comic showing these three benefits. In the description for each panel, explain the benefit and how it's a good thing.

Rubric: Benefits of Entrepreneurship

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Sources are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Entrepreneurship 2 Kinds of Businesses

Featured Layouts

  • Mind Map

Intro

Sometimes you hear a lot about famous entrepreneurs who are starting high-tech companies. They come up with amazing innovations that make the news.

However, a business doesn't have to be high-tech to qualify for entrepreneurship. Every business has an entrepreneur who started it.

Instructions

Create a mind map illustrating at least four different kinds of businesses that could be started by an entrepreneur. They may be big, national companies or small mom-and-pop shops.

Example Mind Map

Business Examples by Student

Here's the link to share this comic:

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Pixton Activity: Entrepreneurship 3 Be an Entrepreneur

Featured Layouts

  • Timeline

Instructions

Pretend that you want to be an entrepreneur when you grow up. Create a timeline that illustrates things you could do as you grow to prepare for that future career. In the description for each panel, explain why you would take that step and how it would help you prepare. Create at least three panels.

Rubric: Be an Entrepreneur

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Sources are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total

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