Over 16 million comics and storyboards created

Free!
Pixton Comic & Storyboard Maker

Lesson Plan by Mitchell Zuvela B. Sc., B. Ed.

Encounters Between Christianity and Islam

Pixton Lesson Plan on Encounters Between Christianity and Islam

Make the Crusades come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
Print All

Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Timeline
  • Mind Map
  • Poster

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

Pixton Lesson Plan on Encounters Between Christianity and Islam
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings the Crusades to life with comics and storyboards.
Pixton Lesson Plan on Encounters Between Christianity and Islam

Featured Props

Encounters Between Christianity and Islam

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Brick
    Brick
  • Building
    Building
  • Building
    Building
  • Cathedral
    Cathedral
  • Cross
    Cross
  • Dunes
    Dunes
  • Ground
    Ground
  • Sword
    Sword
  • Sword
    Sword
  • Window
    Window
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

Encounters Between Christianity and Islam

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

In 1095, the Byzantine Emperor sent a letter to Pope Urban II, asking for aid from the West to help against the Turks, who had taken nearly all of Asia Minor from him. Pope Urban made a public speech and urged all to go to the aid of the Greeks and recover Palestine from the control of the Muslims. In his speech, he made a promise that all those who fought for the Christians, would be absolved from their sins.

"All who die by the way, whether by land or by sea, or in battle against the pagans, shall have immediate remission of sins. This I grant them through the power of God with which I am invested.

O what a disgrace if such a despised and base race, which worships demons, should conquer a people which has the faith of omnipotent God and is made glorious with the name of Christ! With what reproaches will the Lord overwhelm us if you do not aid those who, with us, profess the Christian religion!

Let those who have been accustomed unjustly to wage private warfare against the faithful now go against the infidels and end with victory this war which should have been begun long ago. Let those who for a long time, have been robbers, now become knights. Let those who have been fighting against their brothers and relatives now fight in a proper way against the barbarians. Let those who have been serving as mercenaries for small pay now obtain the eternal reward. Let those who have been wearing themselves out in both body and soul now work for a double honor.

Behold! On this side will be the sorrowful and poor, on that, the rich; on this side, the enemies of the Lord, on that, his friends. Let those who go not put off the journey, but rent their lands and collect money for their expenses; and as soon as winter is over and spring comes, let them eagerly set out on the way with God as their guide."

Reference: From Bongars, Gesta Dei per Francos, 1, pp. 382 f., trans in Oliver J. Thatcher, and Edgar Holmes McNeal, eds., A Source Book for Medieval History, (New York: Scribners, 1905), 513-17

Opening Discussion

After reading the quote from Urban II, discuss the following questions:

  • Do you think the Pope’s decision to “turn robbers into knights” was appropriate?
  • In the Pope’s address, how does Urban describe the Muslims?
  • Do you think that “robbers and peasants” made good soldiers during the Crusades? Why / why not?
  • If you were a peasant who heard Urban's speech, would you be more inspired by your faith, or being absolved from your sins?

Almost 100 years after Urban’s address, and several Crusades later, Jerusalem was conquered by Saladin and fell under Muslim control. Saladin chose not to slaughter Christians who remained in the city of Jerusalem. What message do you think he was trying to send?

Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Timeline
    The Crusades

    View Activity
  • Make a Mind Map
    Rise of the Ottoman Empire

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Biography (Extension / Modification)

    Write a biography about the life of Saladin.

  • Extension / Modification
    Poster (Extension / Modification)

    Design a propaganda Poster that the Catholic Church would have used to recruit the poor to fight in the Crusades.

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Watch the movie Kingdom of Heaven with your class and discuss the historical accuracy of the storyline. Have students create a t-chart comparing the events that were depicted in the movie, to actual historic events.

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Encounters Between Christianity and Islam 1 The Crusades

Featured Layouts

  • Timeline

Instructions

Construct a Timeline discussing the background events that led to the Crusades and the causes, course, and consequences of the European Crusades against Islam in the 11th, 12th, and 13th centuries.

Each panel should include:

  • A title including date or date range
  • An appropriate graphic illustrating the event
  • A detailed description

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: The Crusades

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Source are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total

Example Timeline

The Crusades by Student
First Crusade: 1096-1099The First Crusade was a battle about protecting the Holy Empire against the advancing Turks. The Pope inspired thousand of peasants to fight by promising them that their sins would be forgiven if they fought. The Catholic forces took the city of Antioch and massacred the Jewish and Muslim civilians. The First Crusade unleashed a wave of Catholic fury on other religions of the East.
Second Crusade: 1144-1155The Second Crusade was fought as a result of the fall of the County of Edessa.The Second Crusade was decreed by Pope Eugene III, and was the first of the Crusades to be led by European kings. Louis VII of France and Conrad III of Germany defeated a majority of the Muslim forces, however, an attack on Damascus led to a significant defeat of the Muslims which would motivate future attacks by the East.
Third Crusade: 1187-1192The Third Crusade is also known as The Kings' Crusade. It was an attempt by European leaders to reconquer the Holy Land from Saladin. It was successfull in reversing most of Saladin's conquests, but it failed to capture Jerusalem which was the main goal. Eventually, a treaty was signed between King Richard and Saladin to allow Christian pilgrims to visit the city.
Fourth Crusade: 1202-1204The ultimate goal of the Fourth Crusade was to finally conquer the Muslim controlled Jerusalem. Crusaders were to head directly to Jerusalem to battle, however, Byzantine prince, Alexios Angelos, diverted Crusader troops to Constantinople to help restore his deposed father as emperor. Alexios was crowned co-emperor, but was soon deposed and killed. The Crusaders never left for Jerusalem, instead they deciced to sack the city of Constantinople.
Fifth Crusade: 1213-1221The goal of the Fifth Crusade was the same as the previous, conquer Jerusalem. A Crusade led by Hungary and Austria was unsuccessful in taking the holy city from Muslim hands. A second campaign to take Egypt also failed due to several issues. The most important reason was a lack of supplies which forced the Crusaders to retreat.

Here's the link to share this comic:

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Encounters Between Christianity and Islam 2 Rise of the Ottoman Empire

Featured Layouts

  • Mind Map

Intro

The rise of the Ottoman Empire is a period in history that began with the weakening of the Seljuk Sultanate of Rûm in the very early 14th century, and concluded with the fall of Constantinople. The decline of the Byzantine Empire directly correlates with the rise of the Ottomans. This period saw a shift in power from a singular Christian European society to an Islamic influence.

Instructions

Complete a Mind Map discussing several of the major factors that led the rise of the Ottoman Empire in the 14th and 15th centuries.

Each panel should include:

  • A meaningful title
  • A detailed description
  • An appropriate illustration

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Rise of the Ottoman Empire

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Source are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total

Find more lesson plans:

  • MADE AT PIXTON.COM