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Lesson Plan by Mitchell Zuvela B. Sc., B. Ed.

Emergence and Expansion of Islam to 1500

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings ancient civilizations to life with comics and storyboards.

Make ancient civilizations come to life with comics!

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Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Storyboard
  • Timeline
  • Character Map
  • Photo Story
  • Poster

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

Pixton Lesson Plan on Emergence and Expansion of Islam to 1500
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings ancient civilizations to life with comics and storyboards.
Pixton Lesson Plan on Emergence and Expansion of Islam to 1500

Featured Props

Emergence and Expansion of Islam to 1500

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Book
    Book
  • Building
    Building
  • Camel
    Camel
  • Door
    Door
  • Dune
    Dune
  • Feather
    Feather
  • Jug
    Jug
  • Mat
    Mat
  • Mosque
    Mosque
  • Temple
    Temple
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

Emergence and Expansion of Islam to 1500

Many of the central beliefs of Islam are common among the other major world religions. Christianity, Judaism, and Islam are all derived from similar backgrounds in that they all base their core beliefs from the Hebrew bible. Also, all three are described as monotheistic faiths, meaning they all believe in only one God.

Read the following statements to your class and ask them to decide whether each statement refers to Islam, Judaism, Christianity, or is common to all three.

  • Base their beliefs on a holy book (all)
  • Muhammad is the prophet (Muslim)
  • Worship in a synagogue (Judaism)
  • Largest world religion (Christianity)
  • Friday is main day of worship (Islam)
  • Believe in salvation (all)
  • Believe in rituals (all)
  • Prophet went to heaven (all)
  • Do not have forbidden foods (Christianity)
  • Believe in Heaven and Hell (all)
  • Was founded in an Arabic location (all)
Step 1Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Comic
    Aspects of Islamic Belief

    View Activity
  • Make a Storyboard or Timeline
    Major Events in Islamic History

    View Activity
  • Make a Character Map
    Muslim Stereotypes

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Photo Story (Extension / Modification)

    Create a Photo Story discussing the rituals of the Muslim faith.

  • Extension / Modification
    Poster (Extension / Modification)

    Create a Poster comparing the similarities between the Jewish, Muslim, and Christian faiths.

Step 2Concluding discussion with students

Visit a local Mosque to learn more about the beliefs of Islam. Students can take pictures or write notes about the important aspects or rituals that take place when practicing the Muslim faith. It is important that students are exposed to Islam so they are less likely to develop stereotypes or have negative feelings towards something they do not understand.

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Pixton Activity: Emergence and Expansion of Islam to 1500 1 Aspects of Islamic Belief

Instructions

Design a Mind Map that explores some of the major aspects of Islamic religion.

Describe how each of the following plays an important role in Islamic beliefs:

  • Marriage
  • Family
  • Prayer
  • Charity
  • Fasting

Each panel should include:

  • an appropriate visual
  • an explanation of each major aspect

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Aspects of Islamic Belief

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Source are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total
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Pixton Activity: Emergence and Expansion of Islam to 1500 2 Major Events in Islamic History

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard
  • Timeline

Instructions

Construct a Timeline or Storyboard that describes at least four events in the central political, economic, and religious developments in Islamic history.

Each panel should include:

  • a title (including year)
  • an appropriate graphic
  • a detailed description

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Major Events in Islamic History

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Source are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total

Example Timeline

Major Developments in Islamic History by Student
Umayyad Caliphate: 661The Umayyad family came into power in the Muslim Empire after the end of the First Muslim Civil War. The Umayyads continued the Muslim conquests and incorporated a number of new territories into the Muslim empire. The Umayyad Caliphate covered 15 million square kilometers at its peak, making it the largest empire the world had seen.
Abbasid Caliphate: 750Caliph Al-Mansur founded the city of Baghdad as the choice capital of Persia. There was a growing reliance on Persian bureaucrats to govern the territories conquered by Arab Muslims. Abbasids alienated much of the Muslim world which resulted in the loss of several territories and a gradual reduction in their religious leadership.
The Crusades: 1095The Crusades were a series of major battles between Muslims and Catholics over territory known as the Holy Lands. There were several battles that focused around the occupation of the Kingdom of Jerusalem. Saladin, who was the first sultan of Egypt and Syria, accomplished a major feat by retaking Jerusalem in the second crusade.
Ayyubid Dynasty: 1174The Ayyubid dynasty was founded by Saladin and centered in Egypt. The Middle East was ruled by the Ayyubids for much of the time during the 12th and 13th centuries, controlling countries such as Egypt, Syria, and northern Mesopotamia. Saladin made a tough decision not to massacre Christians and Jews when he retook Jerusalem. His hope was to bring peace, ending the era of The Crusades.
Mongol Invasion: 1219The Mongol invasion brought an end to the Islamic Golden Age. The Mongols destroyed the Islamic economy and massacred large numbers of Muslim fighters and civilians. The last Abbasid caliph, al-Musta'sim, was captured and killed by the Mongols. Baghdad was ransacked, signifying the fall of the largest city of Islam.

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Pixton Activity: Emergence and Expansion of Islam to 1500 3 Muslim Stereotypes

Featured Layouts

  • Character Map

Intro

In society, a stereotype is a preconceived thought or belief of how a certain group of people do things. Usually, these thoughts are negative and inaccurate. Over the past decade, the actions of a few radical Muslims have reinforced a certain stereotype of all Muslims. It is important that we understand the detrimental effect that these feelings can have in a community.

Instructions

Create a Character Map outlining a variety of stereotypes that are portrayed in the media about people of the Muslim faith. It may be useful to research some of the religious practices of the Muslim faith to better understand where the stereotypes may come from.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Muslim Stereotypes

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Source are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total

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