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Lesson Plan by Cassie Bermel B. Ed.

Digital Etiquette

Pixton Lesson Plan on Digital Etiquette

Make online messaging come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
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Featured Layout

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout type.

  • Storyboard

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

Pixton Lesson Plan on Digital Etiquette
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings online messaging to life with comics and storyboards.
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings online messaging to life with comics and storyboards.

Featured Props

Digital Etiquette

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Anger
    Anger
  • Bed
    Bed
  • Camera
    Camera
  • Computer
    Computer
  • House
    House
  • Hurt
    Hurt
  • Laptop
    Laptop
  • Mic
    Mic
  • Phone
    Phone
  • Sign
    Sign
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

Digital Etiquette

Ask students to pair up and list the pros and cons of sending an online message (text, Facebook, email, etc.) rather than calling or talking face to face. Then make a T-Chart with the class to compare everyone's lists.

Ask students to share a time when an online message has been misinterpreted.

  • What was the scenario?
  • How was it misinterpreted (positive / negative)?
  • How was it clarified?
  • Did it cause any major issues?

What techniques have we developed to avoid our messages being misinterpreted (for example, the use of "ha ha" after a statement to show we are joking)? To what effect do these techniques work?

Think about people who intentionally avoid etiquette online, intending to be hurtful.

  • Why do they do this?
  • Why does this happen more online than in person?
Step 1Pixton comic-making activities
Step 2Concluding discussion with students
  • When thinking about Digital Etiquette, what are some important ways we can keep our message clear to avoid misinterpretation?

  • When we get a message that causes a negative reaction, what are some ways to properly handle the situation?
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Digital Etiquette 1 Changing Messages For Intent

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard

Intro

Online messages can often be misinterpreted, because we cannot see the person’s facial expressions or hear his / her tone of voice. Over time, we have developed techniques for avoiding misinterpretation. Think of those techniques for this activity.

Instructions

Imagine you're messaging with someone and s/he says something that surprises you. Using the phrase “I can’t believe you would say that”, create a Storyboard to adapt your message appropriately to achieve the desired tone. Include an explanation to justify your adaptation.

Choose three of the following:

  • Teasing
  • Angry
  • Upset
  • Flirty
  • Serious

See the rubric for guidelines.

Rubric: Changing Messages For Intent

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The image is focused, has thoughtful details and is insightful. The image is clear, well developed, and logical. The image is easy to follow; ideas are correct, but may be basic or simple. The image discusses some relevant ideas, but may have frequent errors. The image is hard to follow; ideas are not developed.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Conventions Complete sentences, spelling, punctuation, grammar (e.g.,
use of pronouns; agreement; verb tense
• correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures • few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning • occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning • several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow • repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Digital Etiquette 2 Changing Messages for Audience

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard

Intro

Just as in speech, it is important to think about your audience before sending a message. Consider how you might word a message in the following scenario.

Instructions

You're running late and need to send a message to the person who's waiting for you. Use a Storyboard to show how you would adapt your message appropriately for each of the following audiences:

  • Your best friend
  • Your mother
  • Your coach / employer

See the rubric for guidelines.

Rubric: Changing Messages for Audience

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The image is focused, has thoughtful details and is insightful. The image is clear, well developed, and logical. The image is easy to follow; ideas are correct, but may be basic or simple. The image discusses some relevant ideas, but may have frequent errors. The image is hard to follow; ideas are not developed.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Conventions Complete sentences, spelling, punctuation, grammar (e.g.,
use of pronouns; agreement; verb tense
• correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures • few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning • occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning • several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow • repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Digital Etiquette 3 Reacting to a Hurtful Text

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard

Instructions

You receive a message that is hurtful to you. In a Storyboard, show what you think and feel 30 seconds after reading it, 5 minutes after reading it, and 20 minutes after reading it. In the last panel, depict an effective way to respond, keeping Digital Etiquette in mind.

See the rubric for guidelines.

Rubric: Reacting to a Hurtful Text

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The image is focused, has thoughtful details and is insightful. The image is clear, well developed, and logical. The image is easy to follow; ideas are correct, but may be basic or simple. The image discusses some relevant ideas, but may have frequent errors. The image is hard to follow; ideas are not developed.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Form Organization and sequence (beginning, middle, end) • proper organization
• sequence is highly effective and has purpose
• panels are thoughtful and detailed
• all panels are organized or logical
• logical sequence
• all panels are present
• most panels are organized or logical
• consistent attention to sequence
• all panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• some attention to sequence
• some panels may be missing
• panels are not organized or logical
• no attention to sequence
• panels are missing
Conventions Complete sentences, spelling, punctuation, grammar (e.g.,
use of pronouns; agreement; verb tense
• correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures • few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning • occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning • several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow • repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
Total

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