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Lesson Plan by Lauren Martin M.Ed.

Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings independent reading to life with comics and storyboards.

Make independent reading come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
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Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map
  • Character Map
  • Plot Diagram

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings independent reading to life with comics and storyboards.
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings independent reading to life with comics and storyboards.
Pixton Lesson Plan on Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney

Main Characters

Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney

When you import any of the activities below, you can choose to share these ready-made characters with your students.

  • Greg Heffley from Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney
    Greg Heffley

    Main character, a middle school trouble maker

  • Rowley Jefferson from Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney
    Rowley Jefferson

    Greg's loyal best friend

  • Manny Heffley from Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney
    Manny Heffley

    Greg's spoiled three-year-old brother

  • Rodrick Heffley from Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney
    Rodrick Heffley

    Greg's older brother who bullies, mocks and tries to embarrass Greg

  • Frank Heffley from Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney
    Frank Heffley

    Greg's father who dislikes that Greg plays video games and sleeps instead of playing outside or playing sports

  • Susan Heffley from Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney
    Susan Heffley

    Greg's overprotective mom who often blames Greg for Manny's behavior

Featured Props

Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Ball
    Ball
  • Bike
    Bike
  • Cheese
    Cheese
  • Controller
    Controller
  • Notepad
    Notepad
  • Pencil
    Pencil
  • Prop Fire Extinguisher
    Prop Fire Extinguisher
  • Room
    Room
  • School
    School
  • Stick
    Stick
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

Have students review the front and back cover of the book, examine the cover images, read the book jacket summary, discuss the significance of the title, and make a prediction about the content and significance of the book.

Opening Discussion

Before reading, discuss the following:

  • What do you already know about this book?
  • What is the literal and figurative meaning of the title?
  • What can you predict about the book based on the title and author?
Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Storyboard or Mind Map
    Tone

    Complete after class reading.

    View Activity
  • Make a Character Map
    Character Map

    Begin at the start of the novel, and make additions throughout the unit.

    View Activity
  • Make a Storyboard
    Theme

    Complete after class discussion.

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Plot Diagram (Extension / Modification)

    Create a Plot Diagram to illustrate the main conflicts in the text.

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Discuss the following:

  • What were the main themes of the story?
  • What were the major symbols and motifs? What made them important?
  • What do you think the climax of the story was?
  • What was the author's purpose in writing this story?
  • What was the text's overall tone (author's attitude) and mood (reader's reaction)?
  • How might the context of when this text was written influence the conflicts and themes?
  • What have you learned from reading this text?
  • Has your perspective on or understanding of life changed from reading this? Why or why not?
  • What makes this book unique?
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Pixton Activity: Diary of a Wimpy Kid 1 Tone

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map

Intro

Review the definition, elements, and examples of the English Language Arts skill of tone.

Instructions

Create a Mind Map or Storyboard that illustrates the tone of the text:

  • Identify the tone in the panel title.
  • Include a quote that enhances tone.
  • Include an appropriate illustration for each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

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Pixton Activity: Diary of a Wimpy Kid 2 Character Map

Featured Layouts

  • Character Map

Intro

Determining character traits is an important skill necessary to understanding the conflicts and themes of the plot. The characteristics that make up the main character and supporting characters help shape the outcome of the narrative.

Instructions

Choose three of your favorite characters from Diary of a Wimpy Kid and create a Character Map for each one.

  • It's important to add as many details as you can to all the parts of the map.
  • Include an appropriate illustration based on the character traits outlined in the novel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Character Map

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The character map is fully developed with details that add significant meaning. The character map is complete; descriptions and details are thoughtful and accurate. The character map is complete; descriptions are basic, but accurate. The character map is incomplete; basic descriptions with little relevant details. The character map is incomplete; descriptions are short or inaccurate.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• significant details that make characters unique and dynamic
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• characters are similar; includes relevant details
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• characters similar to description
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• characters vaguey looks like description
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
• characters do not look like description
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is appropriate; lacks variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• simple language; vague and lacks purpose
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• inappropriate use of language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence • proper organization
• panels are thoughtful and detailed
• all panels are organized or logical
• all panels are present
• most panels are organized or logical
• all panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• some panels may be missing
• panels are not organized or logical
• panels are missing
Conventions Complete sentences, spelling, punctuation, grammar (e.g.,
use of pronouns; agreement; verb tense
• correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures • few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning • occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning • several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow • repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Diary of a Wimpy Kid 3 Theme

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard

Intro

Discuss the themes in the text. The theme of a text is a truth about life or a truth the reader understands better after reading a text.

Instructions

Illustrate at least three themes in a Storyboard:

  • Write the theme in the panel title
  • Create an image that summarizes the theme
  • Include a description that fits the theme

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Theme

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The theme is thoughtfully explained with effective use of examples. The theme is clearly identified; examples are appropriate. The theme is fully identified; limited use of relevant examples. The theme is briefly identified; examples are vague,or poorly developed. The theme is not identified; no use of supporting examples.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is appropriate; lacks variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• simple language; vague and lacks purpose
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• inappropriate use of language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence • proper organization
• examples are properly referenced
• panels are thoughtful and detailed
• all panels are organized or logical
• examples are properly referenced
• all panels are present
• most panels are organized or logical
• examples are properly referenced
• all panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• examples are not/improperly referenced
• some panels may be missing
• panels are not organized or logical
• examples are not referenced
• panels are missing
Conventions Complete sentences, spelling, punctuation, grammar (e.g.,
use of pronouns; agreement; verb tense)
• correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures • few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning • occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning • several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow • repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
Total

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