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Lesson Plan by Maggie M. Larche M.A.

Demand and Quantity Demanded

Pixton Lesson Plan on Demand and Quantity Demanded

Make economic concepts come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
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Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard
  • Graphic Novel
  • Timeline
  • Mind Map

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings economic concepts to life with comics and storyboards.
Pixton Lesson Plan on Demand and Quantity Demanded
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings economic concepts to life with comics and storyboards.

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Demand and Quantity Demanded

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Teacher Guide

Demand and Quantity Demanded

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

Begin by introducing students to both supply and demand, but say that the class will start with demand. The important discussion points include the following:

  • Demand is the desire and willingness of a consumer to buy something.
  • Supply is just the opposite. It's the desire and willingness of a producer to make and/or sell something.

Draw a demand curve on the board for your students which you will reference in the opening discussion.

Finally, review the expression ceterus paribus with your students ("all other things being equal"). Explain that in every example you study, you are assuming that everything else remains the same. This allows you to isolate the effect of one specific factor on demand, while ignoring all the other changes that could be happening at the same time.

Opening Discussion

Ask students to think of the last thing they purchased, and get examples from volunteers. For each example, ask the student what he or she was demanding.

After gathering student examples, explain that demand is more than just transactions at the store. It's on the buyer side of every transaction. People can demand groceries, houses, medical care, free time, even labor.

Explain to students that when we total up all the different entities that might demand something at different price points, we come up with the demand curve. Show them your curve on the board and demonstrate how the line represents all the demand of different people summed up.

Use the demand curve to explore the relationship between quantity demanded and price. Show on the curve how as price goes up, demand goes down, and vice versa. Have students explain why they think that might be so. Tell students that this is an inverse relationship between price and quantity demanded.

Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Storyboard, Comic Strip, or ...
    Different Consumers

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  • Make a Graphic Novel, Storyboard, or ...
    Quantity Demanded

    You may wish to brainstorm settings for these comics as a class. It can be challenging for students to think outside of traditional buying and selling at the store and search for other kinds of transactions.

    View Activity
  • Make a Mind Map
    Elasticity

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Demand for Labor (Extension / Modification)

    The labor market is an interesting example for students to explore demand. Ask students to create a comic showing two parties negotiating a wage rate. In the description for each panel, have the student explain who is demanding the labor and who is supplying it. How might a change in the price (i.e., the wage rate) affect the quantity of labor demanded by the employer?

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Tell your students that there are many factors besides price which can affect demand. You'll examine those in the next lesson: Determinants of Demand.

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Pixton Activity: Demand and Quantity Demanded 1 Different Consumers

Featured Layouts

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard
  • Graphic Novel

Intro

Remember that a consumer is anyone who purchases something. All of us are consumers in some way or another. Every time you buy anything - a car, a book, a stick of gum - you are acting as a consumer and, therefore, making up part of the demand curve.

But did you know that there are different kinds of consumers? Even though they could also be considered producers, both businesses and governments act as consumers at times.

Instructions

Remix the following comic. In each panel, create an illustration of that type of consumer. In the description for each panel, write some of the ways that that entity acts as a consumer. What do they buy? (In other words, what goods and services do they demand?)

It's impossible to list everything that these three groups buy, but come up with at least three examples for each.

Rubric: Different Consumers

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Sources are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Demand and Quantity Demanded 2 Quantity Demanded

Featured Layouts

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard
  • Graphic Novel
  • Timeline

Intro

Quantity demanded and price have an inverse relationship. All that means is that when one goes up, the other goes down.

When the price of something goes up, for instance, fewer people are willing to buy it. After all, it costs more now. So we say that quantity demanded has gone down. Price goes up, quantity demanded goes down. It's an inverse relationship.

Instructions

Draw two different comics of a consumer reacting to a price change. Do they buy more or less of an item after the change?

In the description panel, explain what is happening between price and quantity demanded. Are they moving, and, if so, in what direction?

Of your two comics, only one can take place in a store. For the second comic, think creatively of other situations where people may demand things. Remember that both business and governments can also be consumers. What kind of things do they buy, and how would they respond to price changes?

Rubric: Quantity Demanded

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Sources are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Demand and Quantity Demanded 3 Elasticity

Featured Layouts

  • Mind Map

Intro

We know that quantity demanded and price have an inverse relationship, but to know the extent of that relationship, you need to look at elasticity.

The elasticity of demand measures how much quantity demanded changes after a change in price. If the quantity demanded for a good changes dramatically after a price change, we say that good is highly elastic. If quantity demanded hardly changes after a price change, we call that highly inelastic.

An example of an elastic good is clothing. That's why you see so many sales. When the price of clothing drops, quantity demanded goes way up. Lots of people buy when it's on sale.

An example of an inelastic good is gasoline. People tend to buy the same amount of gas, regardless of the price. It takes a very big shift in price for people to change their buying habits.

Instructions

Create two mind maps, one showing elastic goods and services and one showing inelastic. In the panel description for each good or service, write why you think it would be elastic or inelastic.

Rubric: Elasticity

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Sources are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total

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