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Lesson Plan by Cassie Bermel B. Ed.

Cyberbullying

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings digital citizenship to life with comics and storyboards.

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Featured Layout

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout type.

  • Storyboard

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings digital citizenship to life with comics and storyboards.
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings digital citizenship to life with comics and storyboards.
Pixton Lesson Plan on Cyberbullying

Featured Props

Cyberbullying

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Bed
    Bed
  • Chair
    Chair
  • Computer
    Computer
  • Desk
    Desk
  • Desk
    Desk
  • Ipad
    Ipad
  • Laptop
    Laptop
  • Locker
    Locker
  • Mouse
    Mouse
  • Phone
    Phone
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

Cyberbullying

  • Define bullying and cyberbullying. Ask students to identify examples / forms of cyberbullying – e.g. posting a picture of someone on Facebook with a rude comment above it.

  • Cyberbullying is now one of the most common forms of bullying. Why is that? Why can it be more hurtful than other forms of bullying?

  • Watch “Stacey’s Story: When Rumors Escalate”. Stacey said going to the school with her problem would make things worse. Do you agree? If so, how? How could Stacey have dealt with this differently?
Step 1Pixton comic-making activities
Step 2Concluding discussion with students
  • Do Internet companies and mobile phone companies have a duty to stop cyberbullying? Why / why not?
  • What did you learn about cyberbullying in this unit? Are there aspects of cyberbullying that you had not thought about before?
  • Does the unit make you think any differently about cyberbullying, or bullying in general?
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Pixton Activity: Cyberbullying 1 Types of Cyberbullying

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard

Intro

Watch the video “Cyber-bullying Facts – Top 10 Forms of Cyber Bullying” to understand the definitions for different forms of bullying.

Instructions

Create a Storyboard illustrating and explaining each of the five types of cyberbullying. Be sure to use your own words and not to plagiarize. In each panel include:

  • the type of cyberbullying in the panel title
  • an explanation in the panel description
  • an appropriate image

See rubric for guidelines.

Rubric: Types of Cyberbullying

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview Multiple types of cyber bullying are fully discussed: all examples are thoroughly discussed. More than one type of cyber bullying is fully discussed; examples are well developed and precise. More than one type of cyber bullying is briefly discussed; examples provide sufficient support. One type of cyber bullying is briefly discussed; examples show limited support. One type of cyber bullying is poorly discussed; lacks supporting examples.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is clear with little variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• basic language; vague at times
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• vague, incorrect and repetitive language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Conventions The text demonstrates standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses eloquent words, rich sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses precise words, controlled sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates standard English conventions
• uses words and phrases, telling details and sensory language to convey a vivid picture
• demonstrates some accuracy in standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • contains multiple inaccuracies in Standard English conventions of usage and mechanics
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Cyberbullying 2 Why Cyberbullying Can Hurt More

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard

Intro

We've discussed why Cyberbullying can hurt people more than other forms of bullying. Think about that discussion in the following activity. You can also look at deletecyberbullying.org for more information.

Instructions

Using the Storyboard format, illustrate three reasons why Cyberbullying can be more harmful than other forms of bullying. Be sure to include explanations, using your own words.

See rubric for guidelines.

Rubric: Why Cyberbullying Can Hurt More

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The image is focused, has thoughtful details and is insightful. The image is clear, well developed, and logical. The image is easy to follow; ideas are correct, but may be basic or simple. The image discusses some relevant ideas, but may have frequent errors. The image is hard to follow; ideas are not developed.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Conventions Complete sentences, spelling, punctuation, grammar (e.g.,
use of pronouns; agreement; verb tense
• correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures • few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning • occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning • several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow • repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Cyberbullying 3 When You Are A Victim

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard

Intro

There are many approaches you can take when you are cyberbullied. Read this web page before doing the activity.

Instructions

Create a Storyboard that shows three ways a person can handle being a Cyberbullying victim. Also, illustrate one thing you should not do. In your explanation, be sure to use your own words.

See rubric for details.

Rubric: When You Are A Victim

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The image is focused, has thoughtful details and is insightful. The image is clear, well developed, and logical. The image is easy to follow; ideas are correct, but may be basic or simple. The image discusses some relevant ideas, but may have frequent errors. The image is hard to follow; ideas are not developed.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • clearly shows positive ways to deal with bullies
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• clearly shows positive ways to deal with bullies
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• shows the difference between bullying and conflict
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• somewhat shows positive ways to deal with bullies
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• positive ways to deal with bullies are not shown
• few details or descriptions
Form Organization and sequence (beginning, middle, end) • proper organization
• sequence is highly effective and has purpose
• panels are thoughtful and detailed
• all panels are organized or logical
• logical sequence
• all panels are present
• most panels are organized or logical
• consistent attention to sequence
• all panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• some attention to sequence
• some panels may be missing
• panels are not organized or logical
• no attention to sequence
• panels are missing
Conventions Complete sentences, spelling, punctuation, grammar (e.g.,
use of pronouns; agreement; verb tense
• correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures • few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning • occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning • several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow • repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
Total

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