Over 16 million comics and storyboards created

Free!
Pixton Comic & Storyboard Maker

Lesson Plan by Cassie Bermel B. Ed.

Copyright Laws

Pixton Lesson Plan on Copyright Laws

Make digital citizenship come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
Print All

Featured Layout

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout type.

  • Storyboard

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

Pixton Lesson Plan on Copyright Laws
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings digital citizenship to life with comics and storyboards.
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings digital citizenship to life with comics and storyboards.

Featured Props

Copyright Laws

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Bar
    Bar
  • Book
    Book
  • Flag
    Flag
  • Gavel
    Gavel
  • Jailcell
    Jailcell
  • Lamp
    Lamp
  • Laptop
    Laptop
  • Lock
    Lock
  • Pen
    Pen
  • Prop Letter
    Prop Letter
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

Copyright Laws

Step 1Class discussion with students
  • Ask students to think about something they have created and are proud of. It could be a song, a poem, etc. Share with a partner and then with the class.

  • What are some examples of when you used someone else’s work in your own creations? An example could be using a song in your powerpoint slideshow, or magazine pictures for a collage.

  • What is copyright? How do you know if something is copyrighted? For more definitions that may help students’ understanding of the subject, refer to 411 For Creators.

  • What steps do you need to take in order to use someone else’s work?

    • Find out who created it
    • Get permission to use it
    • Give credit to the creator
    • Buy it (if necessary)
    • Use it responsibly
  • Define piracy and plagiarism. What are some examples of how people engage in these every day? Why are piracy and plagiarism illegal? Why are they immoral?

  • What is fair use? When is it okay to use copyrighted material? Take a look at What is Fair Use and The Four Points of Fair Use to help answer the question.
Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
Step 3Concluding discussion with students
  • What are some things you learned in this unit about respecting Copyright Laws?

  • Although Copyright Laws can be somewhat bothersome at times, how can these help you in your future?
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Copyright Laws 1 How To Use Other People's Work Responsibly

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard

Intro

If you are going to use someone else's work in a legal and responsible way, you must:

  1. Find out who created it
  2. Get permission to use it
  3. Give credit to the creator
  4. Buy it (if necessary)
  5. Use it appropriately

Instructions

Create a Storyboard illustrating the steps a person needs to take to use other people’s work in a responsible, legal manner.

See rubric for guidelines.

Rubric: How To Use Other People's Work Responsibly

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The image is focused, has thoughtful details and is insightful. The image is clear, well developed, and logical. The image is easy to follow; ideas are correct, but may be basic or simple. The image discusses some relevant ideas, but may have frequent errors. The image is hard to follow; ideas are not developed.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Conventions Complete sentences, spelling, punctuation, grammar (e.g.,
use of pronouns; agreement; verb tense
• correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures • few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning • occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning • several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow • repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Copyright Laws 2 Why Piracy and Plagiarism are Illegal

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard

Intro

Your class has discussed what piracy and plagiarism are, as well as why they are illegal. Think about that discussion for the following activity.

Instructions

Using the Storyboard format, illustrate and explain at least three reasons why piracy and plagiarism are immoral and illegal.

See rubric for guidelines.

Rubric: Why Piracy and Plagiarism are Illegal

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The image is focused, has thoughtful details and is insightful. The image is clear, well developed, and logical. The image is easy to follow; ideas are correct, but may be basic or simple. The image discusses some relevant ideas, but may have frequent errors. The image is hard to follow; ideas are not developed.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Conventions Complete sentences, spelling, punctuation, grammar (e.g.,
use of pronouns; agreement; verb tense
• correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures • few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning • occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning • several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow • repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Copyright Laws 3 Examples of Fair Use

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard

Intro

Earlier, your class discussed and researched guidelines and examples of fair use. Think about these for the following activity.

Instructions

Using a 3-6 panel Storyboard, illustrate and discuss at least three examples of fair use of copyrighted material.

See the rubic for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Examples of Fair Use

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The image is focused, has thoughtful details and is insightful. The image is clear, well developed, and logical. The image is easy to follow; ideas are correct, but may be basic or simple. The image discusses some relevant ideas, but may have frequent errors. The image is hard to follow; ideas are not developed.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Conventions Complete sentences, spelling, punctuation, grammar (e.g.,
use of pronouns; agreement; verb tense
• correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures • few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning • occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning • several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow • repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
Total

Find more lesson plans:

  • MADE AT PIXTON.COM