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Lesson Plan by Maggie M. Larche M.A.

Budgeting for High Schoolers

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings personal finance to life with comics and storyboards.

Make personal finance come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
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Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard
  • Graphic Novel
  • Timeline
  • Mind Map

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

Pixton Lesson Plan on Budgeting for High Schoolers
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings personal finance to life with comics and storyboards.
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings personal finance to life with comics and storyboards.

Featured Props

Budgeting for High Schoolers

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Clipboard
    Clipboard
  • Desk
    Desk
  • Fridge
    Fridge
  • Laptop
    Laptop
  • Money
    Money
  • Pencil
    Pencil
  • Prop Magnifying Glass
    Prop Magnifying Glass
  • Prop Plastic Bag
    Prop Plastic Bag
  • Pump
    Pump
  • Till
    Till
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

Budgeting for High Schoolers

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

Start by asking students to volunteer their plans for their first year after high school. Will they be going to college or trade school? Starting a job? Traveling?

Explain that students will gradually become responsible for more and more of their own finances. Do they feel ready to assume control of their own earning and spending?

Opening Discussion

Tell students that a useful personal finance tool is a budget. A budget is simply a spending plan that tracks both income and expenses. As students become adults and make financial decisions, a budget helps them to make wise financial choices and to stay on track.

Explains that, by maintaining a budget, students will be ahead of many of their peers and will be able to start their professional lives on solid financial footing.

Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Graphic Novel, Timeline, or ...
    Income

    Remind students that income can come from many different sources, though we are only focusing on one in this activity. You may also wish to share some average salaries/hourly wages with them for certain kinds of jobs to help them estimate their projected incomes.

    View Activity
  • Make a Mind Map
    Expenses

    View Activity
  • Make a Storyboard, Graphic Novel, or ...
    Create Your Budget

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    When Plans Change (Extension / Modification)

    Remind students that a budget is only a plan to guide you. Sometimes things change, and they will have to reassess. Have students create a comic showing them responding to a change in their income. How will that affect the different parts of their budgets?

  • Extension / Modification
    To Increase an Income (Extension / Modification)

    Tell students that one of the strategies to manage a tight budget is to increase your income. Remind students that one of the best ways to command a higher income is to invest in education and training. Have students draw a comic showing what sort of training that they think would best help them raise their earnings.

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Ask students if they feel more confident to handle their finances as they enter adulthood. It's a time of many new expenses but also new opportunities for income. Remind them that their budgets will help them navigate the change more easily.

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Pixton Activity: Budgeting for High Schoolers 1 Income

Featured Layouts

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard
  • Graphic Novel
  • Timeline

Intro

The first part of any budget is income, or money coming in. For most people, income comes from their main jobs and any side businesses that they run. For business owners, income comes from business profits. For governments, income comes from taxes.

When you leave high school, you will probably experience a growth in income. We're going to explore that in this activity.

Instructions

Draw a comic of you going to get a job. (If you already have a job now, think of what sort of job you would like to go after next.)

Will you need to interview? What clothing will you wear? What kind of job will you target? Do you want full or part time? When you finally do land that job, how will you feel?

And finally, how much will the job earn? This will be your income for your budget.

Rubric: Income

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Sources are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total

Example Comic Strip

Landing a Job by Student

Here's the link to share this comic:

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Budgeting for High Schoolers 2 Expenses

Featured Layouts

  • Mind Map

Intro

Now that you've covered the income side, it's time to consider your expenses. The opposite of income, expenses simply mean money going out. These could be things that you buy, as well as savings, charitable donations, and taxes.

Expenses come in two forms: fixed and variable. Fixed expenses stay the same month after month, such as rent or car insurance. Variable expenses change based on how much you need to buy. Most expenses fall into this category and will not be exactly the same from month to month.

Instructions

Create a mind map showing what you expect to be the six biggest expenses in your first year after high school. If you will be living on your own, you will need to include some form of rent. Will you maintain a car or use public transportation? Will you pay your own health insurance or stay on your parents' plan?

If you're attending college, think through expenses like books and supplies. If you'll be working full time, you'll need to consider uniforms or transportation to and from work. If you're traveling, you'll need to consider plane and train tickets and lodging.

Try to include the category of saving. How much do you think you'd like to save each month for your future?

For each expense, estimate the monthly amount and state if the expense is fixed or variable.

Rubric: Expenses

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Sources are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Budgeting for High Schoolers 3 Create Your Budget

Featured Layouts

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard
  • Graphic Novel
  • Timeline

Intro

Now that you've considered both income and expenses, you can create your budget for your first year after high school. You have to take both sides into account. You'll need to have enough income to cover the expenses you brainstormed. If you're short on income, you may have to adjust your expenses.

Instructions

Draw a comic showing yourself going through a typical week. At the beginning of the week, you'll take home your pay (income). Throughout the rest of the week, show how you will spend your money (your expenses). Hopefully, by the end of the week, you'll have money left over for saving/donating. How will you decide what to do with the remainder?

Rubric: Create Your Budget

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Sources are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total

Example Comic Strip

Budget Throughout the Week by Student

Here's the link to share this comic:

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