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Lesson Plan by Mitchell Zuvela B. Sc., B. Ed.

American Economics

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings social science to life with comics and storyboards.

Make social science come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
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Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Mind Map
  • Storyboard
  • Comic Strip
  • Graphic Novel
  • Poster

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

Pixton Lesson Plan on American Economics
Pixton Lesson Plan on American Economics
Pixton Lesson Plan on American Economics

Featured Props

American Economics

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Barrel
    Barrel
  • Bull
    Bull
  • Coin
    Coin
  • Coins
    Coins
  • Flag
    Flag
  • Machine
    Machine
  • Money
    Money
  • Money
    Money
  • Prop Dollar Sign
    Prop Dollar Sign
  • Television
    Television
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

American Economics

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

In a dramatic fashion, gather the attention of your class with a number of intense stares around the room. As you circulate the room, grab a number of different objects and bring them to the front of the class. Ask your students if they can identify the resources (materials) that were used to construct the objects. For example, a book is made of paper that comes from trees, and ink comes from carbon pigments. Create a list of resources on the board for each of the objects chosen.

Opening Discussion

Provide the class with the following definitions:

  • Renewable Resources: an organic natural resource that can replenish itself over time, e.g. wood, water, sun.
  • Non-Renewable Resources: a resource that cannot be replaced by natural means, e.g. oil, gas, coal.

Look at the components of the objects discussed earlier. Are the resources that are used renewable or non-renewable? How will our world change when a certain resource is gone?

Ask your students to explain why gold is expensive, and iron is not. Use a relevant example to illustrate the connection between supply and demand. For example, if you had the last chocolate bar available at school for the entire year, would someone pay more than a dollar for it? In the future, will the price of gasoline drop in price, or go up? Why?

Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Mind Map
    Scarcity

    View Activity
  • Make a Storyboard or Mind Map
    Types of Resources

    View Activity
  • Make a Graphic Novel, Storyboard, or ...
    Market Economy

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Graphic Novel (Extension / Modification)

    Create a Graphic Novel following the life of a superhero named Scarcityman. He / she flies around the world trying to reduce scarcity by informing people of how to make better choices.

  • Extension / Modification
    Poster (Extension / Modification)

    Create a Poster identifying ways that your school can help recycle non-renewable resources.

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Illustrate the concept of supply and demand by creating a market in your class. Split students into two groups: sellers and buyers.

Provide the buyers with fake money and a list of objects they will need to purchase. Provide the sellers with an inventory of items, including a list of how many are available in the market. Sellers will use sticky notes to label the price of their goods. Buyers can negotiate with the sellers on the price, while sellers can change their prices at any time.

Give the class a defined amount of time to see which students can buy all their goods for the cheapest cost, and which sellers make the most money.

  • Did any of your students base their price on supply?
  • What were the various prices between sellers of the same item?
  • Did any seller charge too much for a good, or too little?
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: American Economics 1 Scarcity

Featured Layouts

  • Mind Map

Intro

Scarcity is an economic problem in which an unlimited number of humans want a limited supply of resources. Our world is facing a major dilemma in dealing with the problems that arise when our resources become extremely limited, or run out. Communities are finding ways to deal with scarcity by making smarter choices.

Instructions

Create a Mind Map that identifies several resources that may become scarce in the future such as water.

  • Identify two or three ways in which communities are making choices to manage scarcity, e.g. low flow toilets, limits on watering lawns, etc.
  • Each panel should include an appropriate illustration and full description.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Scarcity

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Source are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: American Economics 2 Types of Resources

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map

Instructions

Create a comic comparing renewable and non-renewable resources.

  • Provide several examples for each type of resource (e.g. wood)
  • In the panel title, indicate the resource and whether it's renewable or non-renewable
  • Include an illustration and an explanation as to why that resource falls is renewable or non-renewable

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Types of Resources

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Source are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: American Economics 3 Market Economy

Featured Layouts

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard
  • Graphic Novel

Intro

The United States is based on a market economy that is driven by supply and demand. Understanding why products are priced the way they are is crucial in understanding how the world works. Buyers and sellers are required, for successful transactions to take place. If there are no buyers, a seller will have no business. If there are no sellers, a buyer will not be able to acquire a product.

Instructions

Create a Comic Strip, Storyboard, or Graphic Novel that illustrates how a market economy works. Be sure to clearly identify the buyer, seller, and interaction between supply and demand.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Market Economy

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Source are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total

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