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Lesson Plan by Mitchell Zuvela B. Sc., B. Ed.

Africa

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings world geography to life with comics and storyboards.

Make world geography come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
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Pixton Lesson Plan on Africa
Pixton Lesson Plan on Africa
Pixton Lesson Plan on Africa

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Africa

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  • Building
    Building
  • Dunes
    Dunes
  • Fish
    Fish
  • Giraffe
    Giraffe
  • Lion
    Lion
  • Mountains
    Mountains
  • Mud
    Mud
  • Pickaxe
    Pickaxe
  • Spear
    Spear
  • Zebra
    Zebra
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

Africa

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

Ask your class to describe their daily routine including the activities in which they partake during a typical school day. Write down the times and events of all their activities from the time they wake up, until the time they go to sleep. Discuss with your class the similarities or differences that would be found in the schedule of an African child. Use the daily schedule of an African child below to compare with your students.

Daily Schedule of an African Child:

  • 5:30am: ​Wake up and have breakfast of cold maize porridge (called nshima).
  • 6:00 – 7:00am: ​Work in the fields, helping family grow their crops.
  • 7:00 – 8:00am: ​Collect firewood from the forest to make fires for cooking.
  • 8:00 – 9:00am: ​Walk 3 km to school.
  • 9:00am – 9:15am: Sweep classroom and water school garden.
  • 9:15am – 12:30pm: ​Learn at school.
  • 12:30 – 1:30pm: ​Walk home from school.
  • 1:30pm – 3pm: ​Walk 3 km to the well to fetch water for cooking and washing up.
  • 3:00 – 4:30pm: ​Play soccer with friends.
  • 4:30 – 6pm: ​Walk to the well to fetch more water for washing and cooking.
  • 6:00 – 7:30pm: ​Cook and eat the evening meal of nshima and vegetables.
  • 7:30pm: ​Go to bed when it gets dark.

Opening Discussion

Ask your students a few questions about the Daily Schedule of an African Child:

  • What surprised you about the schedule of an African child?
  • Would you enjoy partaking in these daily activities?
  • Why are the activities of an African child different from yours?
  • Why do you think school only lasts a few hours?
  • What supplies are needed to prepare for a meal? How long does it take to prepare?
Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Comic
    Life in Africa

    View Activity
  • Make a Comic
    The Sub-Saharan Empires

    View Activity
  • Make a Comic
    Characteristics of African Settlements

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Poster (Extension / Modification)

    Create an informative Poster illustrating the life of an African woman or child.

  • Extension / Modification
    Map (Extension / Modification)

    Using a blank map of Africa, students will label 10 countries, five landforms, and one Sub-Saharan empire. Below the map will be a list of 10 facts about the continent.

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Explore various African artifacts and works of art with your class by visiting the Museum of African Art and Culture website. Use the Tour link to connect your class with several videos that illustrate and explain African culture. Ask your students to discuss their favorite parts of the museum tour.

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Africa 1 Life in Africa

Instructions

Design a Storyboard that illustrates the daily activities of one of the major ethnic groups in Africa.

Choose from the following groups:

  • Algerian
  • Amhara
  • Egyptian
  • Fula
  • Hausa
  • Igbo
  • Malagasy
  • Moroccan
  • Oromo
  • Somali
  • Sudanese
  • Yoruba

Each panel should include an appropriate graphic and a detailed description of the activity.

Make sure to discuss the language, religion, food, culture, and customs of the chosen ethnic group.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Life in Africa

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Source are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Africa 2 The Sub-Saharan Empires

Instructions

Create a Storyboard that summarizes the culture, economy, and government of one of the following sub-Saharan empires:

  • Ghana
  • Mali
  • Songhay

Each panel should include a title, a detailed description, and an appropriate illustration.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: The Sub-Saharan Empires

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Source are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Africa 3 Characteristics of African Settlements

Instructions

Choose an African country and create a Mind Map that identifies its location, climate, physical characteristics, natural resources, and population size.

  • Be sure to include a title, an appropriate graphic, and a detailed explanation for each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Characteristics of African Settlements

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Understanding of Concepts • explains with extensive detail
• numerous connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions are comprehensive
• explains with detail
• considerable connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have purpose
• explains with sufficient detail
• several connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have basic purpose
• explains with limited detail
• limited connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have little purpose
• explains with no detail
• very few connections made between concept and activity
• illustrations and descriptions have no purpose
Inquiry/Research Skills • Extensive use of details; support from a wide variety of sources
• Facts are accurate and complete
• Source are accurately listed
• Considerable use of details; support from several sources
• Facts are accurate
• Sources are accurately listed
• Includes several relevant details; basic use of sources
• Facts are consistent
• Sources listed
• Some relevant details included; sources are limited
• Facts contain some inaccuracies
• No sources listed
• Very few relevant use of details
• Facts are inaccurate or false
• No sources listed
Communication • excellent communication of ideas
• statements are dynamic with extensive development
• descriptions are purposeful and well organized
• effective communication of ideas
• statements are powerful with appropriate development
• descriptions are concise and organized
• sufficient communication of ideas
• statements are consistent with increasing development
• descriptions are basic and organized
• poor communication of ideas
• statements are general with some development
• descriptions are limited and unorganized
• inadequate communication of ideas
• statement are general with little development
• descriptions are incomplete and unorganized
Style • correct sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation; may include some errors in complex structures
• panels are highly organized with exceptional use of supporting details
• few errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors do not interfere with meaning
• panels have excellent organization with effective use of supporting details
• occasional errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors rarely interfere with meaning
• panels have basic organization and supporting details
• several errors in sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar; errors may make parts hard to follow
• panels have limited organization and supporting details
• repeated errors in basic sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, or grammar often make the writing hard to understand
• panels are unorganized and lack supporting details
Total

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