Over 16 million comics and storyboards created

Free!
Pixton Comic & Storyboard Maker

Lesson Plan by Lauren Martin M.Ed.

Advanced English Grammar

Pixton Lesson Plan on Advanced English Grammar

Make SAT prep come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
Print All

Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard
  • Poster
  • Mind Map

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

Pixton Lesson Plan on Advanced English Grammar
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings SAT prep to life with comics and storyboards.
This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings SAT prep to life with comics and storyboards.

Featured Props

Advanced English Grammar

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Arrow
    Arrow
  • Blackboard
    Blackboard
  • Board
    Board
  • Book
    Book
  • Bookcase
    Bookcase
  • Chair
    Chair
  • Desk
    Desk
  • Line
    Line
  • Pencil
    Pencil
  • Podium
    Podium
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

Advanced English Grammar

Step 1Class discussion with students

Getting Started

There are 10 main grammar skills students will be tested on in AP English and on the SAT / ACT exam:

  1. Fragments
  2. Run-on sentences
  3. Diction (homonymns, word choice, spelling)
  4. Parallelism
  5. Comma usage
  6. Semicolon vs. colon usage
  7. Idiom usage ending in gerunds (being), infinitives (to be), and prepositions (of, in, on, to, for, by, from, about, into)
  8. Subject-verb agreement
  9. Pronoun-antecedent agreement
  10. Adjective vs. adverb modification

Opening Discussion

Discuss and record the following (and consider providing students with reference guides and examples):

  • What makes a sentence a fragment?
  • What (parts of speech) does a sentence need to be complete?
  • What are some examples of phrases that may sound complete but are missing a vital part of speech?
  • What makes a sentence a run-on?
  • How can you fix a run-on sentence?
  • What is an example of a lengthy sentence that can be corrected by being reordered?
  • When do you use a comma?
  • When so you use a semicolon?
  • When do you use a colon?
  • What are the regular and irregular comma rules?
  • What are the regular and irregular subject-verb agreement rules?
  • What is an idiom? What are some examples?
  • Some idioms simply use gerunds, infinitives or prepositions in an unusual or technically incorrect way. Review and memorize a list of these idioms.
  • What is the difference between an adjective and adverb and how do you know which one to use?
  • Pronoun-antecedent agreement refers to using a pronoun that agrees with the noun it modifies in person (1st, 2nd, 3rd), number and gender. What are the irregular pronoun rules for collective nouns and the use of "either/or" "neither/nor".
    • For "either/or" "neither/nor"sentences, use a pronoun that modifies the noun closer to the pronoun.
    • For collective nouns, use a plural pronoun if the collective group is each acting separately/differently, and use a singular pronoun if the collective group is acting as one unit.
  • A parallel sentence has matching verb tenses, meaning every verb in a sentence is present progressive, conditional, future tense, etc. The tense cannot switch mid sentence.
    • For example, "the chef swiftly and with efficiency rolled the dough" must be changed to "the chef swiftly and efficiently..."
  • What is a homonym? What are some examples?
  • How can you remember the following spellings and spelling rules?
    • Accept/except, advise/advice, affect/effect, idea/ideal, its/it's, lead/led, than/then
    • Exceptions to "ie" rule: conscience, counterfeit, forfeit, neither, species, leisure, foreign, seize
    • If the root is NOT a complete word add "ible" as the suffix: visible, horrible, edible, incredible, eligible
    • If the root is a complete word (or with dropped -e) add "able" as the suffix: dependable, comfortable, suitable, advisable, desirable
    • Exceptions: contemptible, digestible, flexible, responsible, irritable, inevitable
Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Comic Strip or Storyboard
    Irregular Comma Rules

    Complete after class discussion.

    View Activity
  • Make a Comic Strip or Storyboard
    Irregular Subject-Verb Agreement Rules

    Complete after class discussion.

    View Activity
  • Make a Comic Strip or Storyboard
    Parallelism

    Complete after class discussion.

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Poster (Extension / Modification)

    Create a Poster to illustrate the correct use of common idioms ending in gerunds, infinitives or prepositions.

  • Extension / Modification
    Storyboard (Extension / Modification)

    Create a Storyboard to illustrate the correct use of common homonyms.

  • Extension / Modification
    Comic Strip (Extension / Modification)

    Create a Comic Strip to illustrate comma, semicolon and colon rules and correct usage.

  • Extension / Modification
    Mind Map (Extension / Modification)

    Create a Mind Map to illustrate correct usage of adjectives vs. adverbs.

Step 3Concluding discussion with students

Discuss the following:

  • What advanced grammar skills do you find easy to remember and why?
  • What advanced grammar skills do you find difficult to remember and why?
  • What mnemonic devices, memory tools, study techniques or daily drills can you create and use to remember every irregular and advanced grammar rule?
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Advanced English Grammar 1 Irregular Comma Rules

Featured Layouts

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard

Intro

Irregular Comma Rules:

  1. Use a comma after an introductory phrase at the beginning of a sentence.
    • After I took an early morning drive through the countryside, I stopped for breakfast.
  2. Use commas before and after non-essential elements of the sentence that provide information that is not essential to complete or understand the sentence.
    • Bob, the realtor, is hosting an open house on Saturday. 
  3. Use commas between two or more adjectives of equal importance (can be in any order) that describe a noun.
    • The muddy, slippery, messy soccer field was filled with puddles.
    • If the adjectives are of unequal importance and must stay in a specific order, they do not require a comma. For example, "big blue eyes" and "bright red hair" do not require commas because "blue big eyes" and "red bright hair" are grammatically incorrect and out of order.
  4. Use commas to separate dates and places.
    • The date was July 25, 2015.
    • He was born in Kansas City, Missouri.
  5. Use a comma before a direct quotation.
    • Paul replied, "I'm taking the earliest flight available."

Instructions

Create a Storyboard or Comic Strip to illustrate four or more irregular comma rules:

  • Include an appropriate title, description and/or dialogue for each panel.
  • Include an appropriate illustration for each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Example Comic Strip

Irregular Comma Rules by Student

Here's the link to share this comic:

Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Advanced English Grammar 2 Irregular Subject-Verb Agreement Rules

Featured Layouts

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard

Intro

The basic subject-verb agreement rule states that a singular subject takes a singular verb, while a plural subject takes a plural verb.Review the irregular subject-verb agreement rules:

  1. Sometimes the subject is separated from the verb by words such as, along with, as well as, besides, or not. Ignore these expressions when determining whether to use a singular or plural verb.
    • The politician, along with the newsmen, is expected shortly.
    • Excitement, as well as nervousness, is the cause of her shaking.
  2. Ignore portion words (percent, fraction, part, majority, some, all, none, remainder, and so forth) and look at the noun being referred to (object of the preposition).
    • Fifty percent (all, none, some) of the pie has disappeared.
    • Fifty percent (all, none, some) of the pies have disappeared.
    • One-third of the city is unemployed.
    • One-third of the people are unemployed.
  3. The expression "the number" is followed by a singular verb while "a number" is followed by a plural verb.
    • The number of people we need to hire is thirteen.
    • A number of people have written in about this subject.
  4. In sentences beginning with "here" or "there", the subject follows the verb.
    • There are four hurdles to jump.
    • There is a high hurdle to jump.
  5. The pronouns "who", "that", and "which" become singular or plural according to the noun directly in front of them.
    • Selma is the scientist who writes the reports = The scientist writes.
    • He is one of the men who do the work = The men do work.
  6. Collective nouns (team, staff, class) are singular or plural depending on if the collective group is each acting separately/differently (plural verb) or if the collective group is acting as one unit (singular).
    • The staff is in a meeting.
    • The staff are in disagreement.
  7. Use a singular verb with sums of money or periods of time.
    • Ten dollars is a high price.
    • Five years is the maximum sentence.
  8. When used as pronouns the following words are all singular: either, neither, each, everyone, everybody, somebody, someone and anyone.
    • Each of the girls sings well.
    • Everyone has gone home.
    • Neither of them is available to speak right now.
    • Either of us is capable of doing the job.

Instructions

Create a Storyboard or Comic Strip to illustrate four or more irregular subject-verb agreement rules:

  • Include an appropriate title, description and/or dialogue for each panel.
  • Include an appropriate illustration for each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Example Comic Strip

Irregular Subject Verb Agreement by Student
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: Advanced English Grammar 3 Parallelism

Featured Layouts

  • Comic Strip
  • Storyboard

Intro

Parallelism means balance and equality in a sentence. If you begin talking about something one way, you can't – mid-sentence – talk about it in a different way. Parallelism is used with:

  • Elements joined by a conjunction
  • Elements in a series or list
  • Elements being compared
  • Elements joined by a linking word verb or a form of "to be"
  • Elements joined by linking words (not only..but also...)

Practice parallelism by fixing the following non-parallel sentences:

  1. The teacher not only wants his students to keep quiet but also to do the task.
  2. The chef swiftly and efficiently rolled the dough.
  3. Nancy likes playing the trumpet, the piano and drumming.
  4. Public transit such as buses and trains can help reduce pollution.

Instructions

Create a Storyboard or Comic Strip to correct the above non-parallel sentences to be parallel:

  • Include an appropriate title, description and/or dialogue for each panel.
  • Include an appropriate illustration for each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Example Comic Strip

Parallelism by Student

Here's the link to share this comic:

Find more lesson plans:

  • MADE AT PIXTON.COM