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Lesson Plan by Cassie Bermel B. Ed.

A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare

This free, printable Pixton lesson plan brings Shakespeare to life with comics and storyboards.

Make Shakespeare come to life with comics!

Including these awesome activities:
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Featured Layouts

When students complete the activities in this lesson plan, they will use the following comic layout types.

  • Character Map
  • Plot Diagram
  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map
  • Graphic Novel
  • Poster

Your students will create amazing images like these in no time!

Pixton Lesson Plan on A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare
Pixton Lesson Plan on A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare
Pixton Lesson Plan on A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare

Main Characters

A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare

When you import any of the activities below, you can choose to share these ready-made characters with your students.

  • Puck from A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare
    Puck

    Also known as Robin Goodfellow, Oberon’s jester fairy who likes to play tricks on mortals

  • Oberon from A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare
    Oberon

    The king of the fairies, Titania’s husband

  • Titania from A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare
    Titania

    The queen of the fairies, Oberon’s wife

  • Lysander from A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare
    Lysander

    Young man in love with Hermia. Cannot marry her because her father does not approve

  • Demetrius from A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare
    Demetrius

    Young man of Athens, at first in love with Hermia, but later loves Helena

  • Hermia from A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare
    Hermia

    A young woman and Egeus’s daughter, in love with Lysander and friend of Helena

  • Helena from A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare
    Helena

    A young woman and in love with Demetrius

  • Egeus from A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare
    Egeus

    Hermia’s father, wants Hermia to marry Demetrius

  • Theseus from A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare
    Theseus

    Duke of Athens, to be married to Hippolyta

  • Hippolyta from A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare
    Hippolyta

    Queen of the Amazons, to be married to Theseus

  • Nick Bottom from A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare
    Nick Bottom

    The arrogant weaver chosen to act as Pyramus in the play. Puck turns his head into a donkey without him knowing.

  • Peter Quince from A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare
    Peter Quince

    A carpenter and the leader of the craftsmen’s attempt to put on a play for Theseus’s wedding

  • Francis Flute from A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare
    Francis Flute

    The man forced to play Thisbe in the play for Theseus’s wedding

  • Robin Starveling from A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare
    Robin Starveling

    The tailor to play Thisbe’s mother in the play

  • Tom Snout from A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare
    Tom Snout

    The tinker chosen to play Pyramus’s father in the play

  • Snug from A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare
    Snug

    The joiner chosen to play the lion in the play

  • Philostrate from A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare
    Philostrate

    The Master of Revels, organizes the entertainment for Theseus’ wedding

Featured Props

A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare

Student creations come alive with these themed objects – in addition to our library of over 3,000 props!

  • Arrow
    Arrow
  • Bottle
    Bottle
  • Cloud
    Cloud
  • Fairy
    Fairy
  • Flower
    Flower
  • Grass
    Grass
  • Moon
    Moon
  • Shrub
    Shrub
  • Stage
    Stage
  • Tree
    Tree
Print this Teacher Guide

Teacher Guide

A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare

Step 1Class discussion with students

Before your students read A Midsummer Night’s Dream, introduce them to the play by discussing the major themes of:

  • Love’s Difficulty
  • Magic
  • Dreams

Ask your class, “In a perfect world two people fall in love and they live happily ever after. However, that is not the reality. What are some problems we have when it comes to love?” Organize their ideas by drawing a mind map on the board.

Ask students to think about love problems we see in movies, and how they are solved, considering both reality, and fantasy movies.

Have students write a paragraph answering the following: “If you had a love potion, would you use it? Why or why not?” Ask them to think about the possible complications of what a love potion would entail (the person loving someone else, the feelings not being authentic, etc.).

Step 2Pixton comic-making activities
  • Make a Character Map
    Character Map

    Begin after the first act, and make additions after subsequent acts. .

    View Activity
  • Make a Plot Diagram
    Conflict and Plot

    Complete at the end of the play.

    View Activity
  • Make a Storyboard or Mind Map
    Major Themes

    Complete at the end of the play.

    View Activity
  • Extension / Modification
    Graphic Novel (Extension / Modification)

    Create a short Graphic Novel using one panel to represent each scene (11 total). Modification: Create a present day high school version of the play, using the ideas and themes of A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

  • Extension / Modification
    Poster (Extension / Modification)

    Create a Poster advertising the play Pyramus and Thisbe.

Step 3Concluding discussion with students
  • This play is very different than Shakespeare’s most famous plays, tragedies like Romeo and Juliet, and Hamlet. The setting is also very different. How does Shakespeare use the night, the woods, and the fairies to move the plot forward?

  • Why might Shakespeare choose to write such different plays? Think about the times in which he was writing.

  • What types of love problems did Shakespeare highlight in this play? (Compare to pre-reading mind map.) What are some love problems now that were not issues at the time Shakespeare wrote this play?
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Pixton Activity: A Midsummer Night's Dream 1 Character Map

Featured Layouts

  • Character Map

Intro

Comparing and contrasting is an important skill that will help reinforce key attributes of the play’s characters, and helps create connections with the plot and theme. The characteristics that make up the protagonist and antagonist help shape the outcome of the narrative. Shakespearean plays are known for their “Foil Characters” whose main values differ from that of the protagonist.

Instructions

Choose three of your favorite characters from A Midsummer Night’s Dream and create a Character Map for each one.

  • Make sure to include a character and his / her foil character among your selection.
  • It's important to add sufficient detail to all the parts of the map.
  • Include an appropriate illustration based on the characters' attributes that are outlined in the play.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Character Map

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The character map is thoughtful; descriptions are detailed and informative. The character map is fully developed; accurate details and insightful descriptions. The character map is complete; descriptions are simple and settings are accurate. The character map includes basic details, but is not fully developed. The character map does not accurately reflect the characters.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• summary is clear and highly detailed
• descriptions are thoughtful and highly developed
• significant details that make characters unique and dynamic
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• summary is clear and accurate
• logical descriptions that clarify and develop the idea
• characters are similar; includes relevant details
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• summary is short, but accurate
• descriptions are simple and consistent
• characters similar to description
• some relevant ideas
• summary has several errors
• descriptions are brief and lack detail
• characters vaguely looks like description
• often very brief
• summary is has significant errors
• descriptions are difficult to follow
• characters do not look like description
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is clear with little variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• basic language; vague at times
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• vague, incorrect and repetitive language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence • proper organization
• panels are thoughtful and detailed
• all panels are organized or logical
• all panels are present
• most panels are organized or logical
• all panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• some panels may be missing
• panels are not organized or logical
• panels are missing
Conventions The text demonstrates standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses eloquent words, rich sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses precise words, controlled sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates standard English conventions
• uses words and phrases, telling details and sensory language to convey a vivid picture
• demonstrates some accuracy in standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • contains multiple inaccuracies in Standard English conventions of usage and mechanics
Total
Print this Activity

Pixton Activity: A Midsummer Night's Dream 2 Conflict and Plot

Featured Layouts

  • Plot Diagram

Instructions

Summarize A Midsummer Night’s Dream in a six-panel Plot Diagram.

  • Include a brief description and an illustration for each point of the plot diagram (exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, denouement), as well as for the main conflict.

  • Be sure to identify the key points that are essential in defining each specific act.

  • Think about relevant quotes that could be used to help create meaning in each panel.

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Conflict and Plot

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The dramatic structure is focused, with advanced use of language/ideas. The dramatic structure is well developed with full and accurate descriptions. The plot diagram is accurate and logical; descriptions may be brief. The dramatic structure is basic, has several errors, and lacks detail. The dramatic structure is inaccurate, and is difficult to follow.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• summary is clear and highly detailed
• descriptions are thoughtful and highly developed
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• summary is clear and accurate
• logical descriptions that clarify and develop the idea
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• summary is short, but accurate
• descriptions are simple and consistent
• some relevant ideas
• summary has several errors
• descriptions are brief and lack detail
• often very brief
• summary is has significant errors
• descriptions are difficult to follow
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • varies language to develop meaning
• varies sentence structure for effect
• images and characters have impact on the meaning of the panel
• language is clear with some variety
• varies sentence structure
• makes attempts to use descriptive language
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is clear with little variety
• basic sentence structure with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• basic language; vague at times
• some variety in sentence length and type
• images and characters have minimal development
• vague, incorrect and repetitive language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence (5 Act Play design) • proper organization
• sequence is highly effective and has purpose
• panels are thoughtful and detailed
• all panels are organized or logical
• logical sequence
• all panels are present
• most panels are organized or logical
• consistent attention to sequence
• all panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• some attention to sequence
• some panels may be missing
• panels are not organized or logical
• no attention to sequence
• panels are missing
Conventions The text demonstrates standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses eloquent words, rich sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses precise words, controlled sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates standard English conventions
• uses words and phrases, telling details and sensory language to convey a vivid picture
• demonstrates some accuracy in standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • contains multiple inaccuracies in Standard English conventions of usage and mechanics
Total

Example Plot Diagram

Conflict and Plot in “A Midsummer Night's Dream” by Student

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Student Handout

Share this comic with your students to demonstrate the activity without giving away the farm :)

Conflict and Plot in “Cinderella” by Pixton
ExpositionCinderella lives a humble life with her father, and is very happy. However, soon after taking a new wife, Cinderella's father passes away. Main ConflictWith her new husband now deceased, Lady Tremaine and her two daughters take over the house. Rather than welcoming Cinderella into the family, they make her a servant and treat her cruelly. Rising ActionThe Prince, looking to get married, announces there will be a ball for all the ladies in the kingdom to attend. Cinderella plans to go but her stepsisters ruin her dress. As she sits in tears, her fairy godmother appears and gives her everything she needs for a grand experience at the ball. But there is a catch; at midnight, everything will return to how it was before. ClimaxCinderella enters the ballroom and immediately catches Prince Charming's eye. After a night of dancing, the two are in love. Cinderella loses track of time, however, and when the clock strikes midnight, she flees from the ball. Prince Charming is left with nothing but her glass slipper. Falling ActionThe prince is determined to find the mysterious woman from the ball. He sends his men to visit every household in the kingdom and have them try on the glass slipper. The woman whom the shoe fits will be the new princess. DenouementAt last, Cinderella gets a chance to try on the glass slipper and it fits perfectly. Prince Charming knows she is the one he fell in love with at the ball. He rescues her from her wicked stepfamily and they live happily ever after.
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Pixton Activity: A Midsummer Night's Dream 3 Major Themes

Featured Layouts

  • Storyboard
  • Mind Map

Intro

Three major themes in A Midsummer Night’s Dream are:

  • Love’s Difficulty
  • Magic
  • Dreams

Instructions

For each major theme in the play, identify at least two exemplary scenes and depict them in a Mind Map or Storyboard:

  • Identify the Act and scene in the panel title
  • Create an image that summarizes the scene
  • Formulate a brief description of how the example fits the theme

See the rubric for grading guidelines.

Rubric: Major Themes

Use this interactive rubric for easy, thorough assessment. It can even be used by students for self-assessment!

5 4 3 2 1
Overview The theme is highly developed; examples have significant purpose and are highly detailed. The theme is well developed; examples are specific and provide ample support. The theme is briefly discussed; examples are accurate but not fully explained. The theme is poorly discussed; vague or irrelevant examples. The theme is not identified; lacks any supporting examples.
Meaning Ideas, information and use of detail • strong point of view
• develops ideas clearly and logically with details, examples, and descriptions
• relevant ideas with consistent analysis
• logical descriptions or examples clarify and develop the ideas
• relevant ideas with some analysis
• examples or descriptions are simple and consistent
• few relevant ideas
• examples or descriptions may be poorly developed or illogical
• ideas are not developed
• few details or descriptions
Style Clarity, variety, impact of visuals and language • language is clear, varied
• flows smoothly; variety in sentences
• images and characters are fully developed; high attention to detail
• language is clear with some variety
• includes a variety of sentence lengths and patterns
• images and characters have purpose and significance
• language is clear with little variety
• basic sentence structures with a few variations
• images and characters are basic, but have purpose
• basic language; vague at times
• repeats a few basic sentence structures
• images and characters have minimal development
• vague, incorrect and repetitive language
• poorly constructed sentences; little variety
• images and characters are poorly developed
Form Organization and sequence • proper organization
• examples are properly referenced
• panels are thoughtful and detailed
• all panels are organized or logical
• examples are properly referenced
• all panels are present
• most panels are organized or logical
• examples are properly referenced
• all panels are present
• some panels are organized or logical
• examples are not/improperly referenced
• some panels may be missing
• panels are not organized or logical
• examples are not referenced
• panels are missing
Conventions The text demonstrates standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses eloquent words, rich sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates precise English conventions
• uses precise words, controlled sensory language and mood to convey a realistic picture
• demonstrates standard English conventions
• uses words and phrases, telling details and sensory language to convey a vivid picture
• demonstrates some accuracy in standard English conventions of usage and mechanics • contains multiple inaccuracies in Standard English conventions of usage and mechanics
Total

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