KristenNadal44

SASAH Cemetery Project Part II

by KristenNadal44

Creative Commons Tuesday November 11, 2014

0 comments

Six weeks, we were on the water, until we arrived.

Canada. Their new home. The Boyds greeted it with a smile.

And Father told me that this place, London, Ontario, is the place I’m to be loyal to from now on.

Robert used most of the money he brought to buy the property, and the next week he set up shop on 380 Richmond Street, hoping to bring some more in.

The men from the Orange Society meet us at the docks and set us up in our new home: 572 Colborne Street.

R. Boyd and Sons, Merchant Tailors. Dealers in Clothing and Gent’s Furnishings. Thomas, William and I started school. Father said when we were older, we could help him run the shop.

I set up house. It was difficult with the three young ones running around, and another one on the way. Robert Jr. was coughing more every day.

Mary sent for the doctor, but he told them it was too late. They lost Robert Jr. the week after, in March. He was twelve years old. It broke his Mama’s heart. When the new baby was born four months later, they christened him Robert. This was the Boyds' new start.

Robert spent many long days at the shop, greeting customers, doing business, and tailoring. The Orange Society would recommend him to other members of the fraternity, and soon he had many customers.

At home, it seemed all Mary did was worry. Little Robert Jr wasn’t growing as he should have, and Joseph, though he was almost five, still hadn’t started talking. Mary Anna, always the perfect angel, started to go to school.

Our family went to our church every Sunday; the same Methodist Church attended by all the members of the London Orange Society. I listened to every sermon and after a year I became an acolyte. I rang the church bell before every service.

Little Robert died in February, 1963. He was one year and seven months old. I was now thirty-nine, and could no longer bring children into the world.

Over the next six years, many hotels and businesses flourished on Richmond Street, including Robert's. When John turned eighteen, he became the first business partner.

In 1870, when I, Thomas, was twenty-one years old, I became a Minister in the Methodist Church, bringing the word of God to people through the Protestant religion in which my family believed.

Joseph became more difficult to deal with as he grew bigger. In 1876, the Boyds learned of the opening of the Orillia Asylum for Idiots. They sent Joseph to board there the year that it opened. He was eighteen years old.

In 1872, John married Sarah Maurice, and he moved down the street, to 694 Colborne. I married Rosanna Taylor in 1875 and continued my post as Minister at the Primitive Methodist Church. Mary Anna married Alfred Westland, but our youngest sister Jane remained a spinster.

Robert's tailoring business became the busiest of its kind on Richmond Street, and he purchased space for an advertisement on the front page of the City Directory.

Mama asked me to counsel William, thinking that religion could help him find his path. He was withdrawing and displaying strange symptoms.

It didn’t. When he was still unable to support himself at age 24, he became an inmate at the London Asylum for the Insane. Asylums were being built all over the country, and even back in Ireland, and the Boyds were confident that the new treatments they could provide William with—bloodletting, hydrotherapy, and drug sedation—could give him some relief. In this time of grief, Thomas lost his dear wife Rosanna. Shortly afterwards, in 1880, he moved to Brantford to become a clergyman at a local church. There he met Miss Anna Maria Morgan, and married her in 1884.

In the last years of my life, I relinquished ownership of my Merchant Taylor business to John, but retained my place in the ranks of the city. I knew many people, and also passed on my passion for our home to my son, who became an Alderman for the city of London and Middlesex county. I bought a new cottage on Cartwright Street and spent my days there.

Family was always tinged with joy and pain. My eldest, John, and his wife Sarah, provided Robert and I with our first grandchildren—Fredrick and Alva Boyd. While we celebrated this, we mourned the loss of our dear daughter Mary Anna to pneumonia in 1885. She had not yet become a mother. John and Sarah gave us Robert and Aggie, and Thomas and Annie had Harold and Marion.

Sarah Boyd purchased a plot in Woodland Cemetery and there Robert, Mary, and multiple members of the Boyd family were buried. All sides of the white obelisk grave marker are covered in their names, beautifully engraved in the stone.

Robert took ill after a night out driving with a friend, was bedridden for three days, and passed on April 6th, 1888. His condition was listed as "Inflammatory Bowel". His wife Mary continued to live in the family home until her own death on April 27th, 1894.

All money would also go to John, subject to a payment of $200 a year to both Joseph and Jane (after Mary’s death.) If Jane got married, she would no longer receive this payment.

Robert Boyd's will was found on reel 6 of the 1866 Estate files. The will was originally read on May 21st, 1888. The two executors were his eldest son John and his youngest daughter Jane.

Mary, for the rest of her life, held the real estate, and supported Joseph and Jane. When she died, the will specified that Jane would inherit the house on Colborne Street. Eva Florence (John's daughter) inherits the cottage and lot on the west side of Cartwright Street.

Thomas, Annie, and the children travelled southwestern Ontario as he preached at different churches. They eventually settled in Halton, Ontario.

Thomas died on March 16, 1928 at the age of 79, from pneumonia. He's now buried in St. Jude’s Cemetery in Oakville.

Jane remained unmarried. At thirty, she moved to Algoma and worked as a domestic for the Elliot family. At 42, still single, she moved in with her eldest brother John and his family. She died in 1914 at the age of 50.

John died on September 25, 1905 from inflammatory rheumatism and mitral disease. His occupation varies, including city councillor and undertaker. In 1891 he had a 9 year old girl living in his household named “Mary Ward” who was listed as a dressmaker (servant) and who was Roman Catholic.

The two institutionalised Boyd brothers, William and Joseph, both died from tuberculosis; the former died after 1 year of suffering, while the latter passed after three. William passed at 54 years old on May 20, 1906, while Joseph died in 1920 at the age of 60.

Perhaps I am too much of a Dom Juan when I should be more of a Sganarelle. I wonder sometimes if being exposed to so much knowledge, through literature and science, renders our anxiety to understand meaning and life after death that much greater.

I've been back to Woodland once since I met with Paul Culliton, to see the white obelisk. I wish I could ask Robert and Mary if living as they did was... enough. They ran a business, raised children, and had obviously strong religious ties, but were they truly happy?

I suppose my attitude has changed in that I've learned that life is for the living, and that one does not have to be remembered after death to be considered a success. Which is a huge turnaround since all I used to feel like my life was intrinsically meaningless.

And tucked safely away in the Woodland cemetery, the Boyd family sleeps for another hundred years.... Not completely forgotten, but peacefully left alone to slumber.

Six weeks, we were on the water, until we arrived. | Canada. Their new home. The Boyds greeted it with a smile. | And Father told me that this place, London, Ontario, is the place I’m to be loyal to from now on. Robert used most of the money he brought to buy the property, and the next week he set up shop on 380 Richmond Street, hoping to bring some more in. | The men from the Orange Society meet us at the docks and set us up in our new home: 572 Colborne Street. R. Boyd and Sons, Merchant Tailors. Dealers in Clothing and Gent’s Furnishings. Thomas, William and I started school. Father said when we were older, we could help him run the shop. I set up house. It was difficult with the three young ones running around, and another one on the way. Robert Jr. was coughing more every day. Mary sent for the doctor, but he told them it was too late. They lost Robert Jr. the week after, in March. He was twelve years old. It broke his Mama’s heart. When the new baby was born four months later, they christened him Robert.  This was the Boyds' new start. Robert spent many long days at the shop, greeting customers, doing business, and tailoring. The Orange Society would recommend him to other members of the fraternity, and soon he had many customers. At home, it seemed all Mary did was worry. Little Robert Jr wasn’t growing as he should have, and Joseph, though he was almost five, still hadn’t started talking. Mary Anna, always the perfect angel, started to go to school. Our family went to our church every Sunday; the same Methodist Church attended by all the members of the London Orange Society. I listened to every sermon and after a year I became an acolyte. I rang the church bell before every service. Little Robert died in February, 1963. He was one year and seven months old. I was now thirty-nine, and could no longer bring children into the world. Over the next six years, many hotels and businesses flourished on Richmond Street, including Robert's. When John turned eighteen, he became the first business partner. In 1870, when I, Thomas, was twenty-one years old, I became a Minister in the Methodist Church, bringing the word of God to people through the Protestant religion in which my family believed. Joseph became more difficult to deal with as he grew bigger. In 1876, the Boyds learned of the opening of the Orillia Asylum for Idiots. They sent Joseph to board there the year that it opened. He was eighteen years old. In 1872, John married Sarah Maurice, and he moved down the street, to 694 Colborne.  I married Rosanna Taylor in 1875 and continued my post as Minister at the Primitive Methodist Church.  Mary Anna married Alfred Westland, but our youngest sister Jane remained a spinster. Robert's tailoring business became the busiest of its kind on Richmond Street, and he purchased space for an advertisement on the front page of the City Directory. Mama asked me to counsel William, thinking that religion could help him find his path. He was withdrawing and displaying strange symptoms. It didn’t. When he was still unable to support himself at age 24, he became an inmate at the London Asylum for the Insane. Asylums were being built all over the country, and even back in Ireland, and the Boyds were confident that the new treatments they could provide William with—bloodletting, hydrotherapy, and drug sedation—could give him some relief. In this time of grief, Thomas lost his dear wife Rosanna. Shortly afterwards, in 1880, he moved to Brantford to become a clergyman at a local church. There he met Miss Anna Maria Morgan, and married her in 1884. In the last years of my life, I relinquished ownership of my Merchant Taylor business to John, but retained my place in the ranks of the city. I knew many people, and also passed on my passion for our home to my son, who became an Alderman for the city of London and Middlesex county. I bought a new cottage on Cartwright Street and spent my days there. | Family was always tinged with joy and pain. My eldest, John, and his wife Sarah, provided Robert and I with our first grandchildren—Fredrick and Alva Boyd. While we celebrated this, we mourned the loss of our dear daughter Mary Anna to pneumonia in 1885. She had not yet become a mother. John and Sarah gave us Robert and Aggie, and Thomas and Annie had Harold and Marion. Sarah Boyd purchased a plot in Woodland Cemetery and there Robert, Mary, and multiple members of the Boyd family were buried. All sides of the white obelisk grave marker are covered in their names, beautifully engraved in the stone. | Robert took ill after a night out driving with a friend, was bedridden for three days, and passed on April 6th, 1888. His condition was listed as "Inflammatory Bowel". His wife Mary continued to live in the family home until her own death on April 27th, 1894. All money would also go to John, subject to a payment of $200 a year to both Joseph and Jane (after Mary’s death.) If Jane got married, she would no longer receive this payment. | Robert Boyd's will was found on reel 6 of the 1866 Estate files. The will was originally read on May 21st, 1888. The two executors were his eldest son John and his youngest daughter Jane. | Mary, for the rest of her life, held the real estate, and supported Joseph and Jane. When she died, the will specified that Jane would inherit the house on Colborne Street. Eva Florence (John's daughter) inherits the cottage and lot on the west side of Cartwright Street. Thomas, Annie, and the children travelled southwestern Ontario as he preached at different churches. They eventually settled in Halton, Ontario. | Thomas died on March 16, 1928 at the age of 79, from pneumonia. He's now buried in St. Jude’s Cemetery in Oakville. Jane remained unmarried. At thirty, she moved to Algoma and worked as a domestic for the Elliot family. At 42, still single, she moved in with her eldest brother John and his family. She died in 1914 at the age of 50. | John died on September 25, 1905 from inflammatory rheumatism and mitral disease. His occupation varies, including city councillor and undertaker. In 1891 he had a 9 year old girl living in his household named “Mary Ward” who was listed as a dressmaker (servant) and who was Roman Catholic. The two institutionalised Boyd brothers, William and Joseph, both died from tuberculosis; the former died after 1 year of suffering, while the latter passed after three. William passed at 54 years old on May 20, 1906, while Joseph died in 1920 at the age of 60. Perhaps I am too much of a Dom Juan when I should be more of a Sganarelle. I wonder sometimes if being exposed to so much knowledge, through literature and science, renders our anxiety to understand meaning and life after death that much greater. | I've been back to Woodland once since I met with Paul Culliton, to see the white obelisk. I wish I could ask Robert and Mary if living as they did was... enough. They ran a business, raised children, and had obviously strong religious ties, but were they truly happy? I suppose my attitude has changed in that I've learned that life is for the living, and that one does not have to be remembered after death to be considered a success. Which is a huge turnaround since all I used to feel like my life was intrinsically meaningless. And tucked safely away in the Woodland cemetery, the Boyd family sleeps for another hundred years.... Not completely forgotten, but peacefully left alone to slumber.

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KristenNadal44

KristenNadal44

I'm from Canada.
Joined November 9, 2014
2 comics published

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